Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, 126 NE Alberta, 1727 NW Hoyt, and more

A proposed development at 1727 NW Hoyt St, designed by Carleton Hart Architecture for Northwest Housing Alternatives, would include 149 units of affordable housing.

The Oregonian reported that the management group behind the Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring Major League Baseball to the city, have put in offers for two sites: the Portland Public Schools Blanchard Education Service Center near the Rose Quarter and the Esco Industrial site in Northwest Portland. The paper also reported that the group has spent $30,000 lobbying city hall to date. The Willamette Week reported that the offer to PPS would include giving the school district the former Banfield Pet Hospital Headquarters on 82nd Avenue.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about how the threat of a large apartment building at 1727 NW Hoyt St has led one neighbor to dig deep into history.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how an upzone at 126 NE Alberta St would turn a parking lot into 50 below-market-rate homes. An op-ed in the Oregonian described the proposal as the “21st-century version of red-lining“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on plans for to build the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter at the Broadway Bridge. The proposal is latest in a number of plans for the site*, which have included One Waterfront Place and the Broadway Bridge-Naito Parkway Apartments. In an article about the project the Portland Tribune revealed that plans for a shelter in an existing building at 320 NW Hoyt St have now been abandoned due to the high costs of converting the building to a new use.

OPB reported on Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative Inc’s plans to plans to bring African-American families back to North Portland.

The Portland Business Journal published a visual tour of CENTRL Office’s latest space in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Redfox Commons.  The project involves the conversion of the Old Freeman Factory in Northwest Portland into creative office space.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.