Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Block 76 West, ODOT Blocks, and more

Fremont Place

The revised design for the Fremont Place apartments will include a wider greenway trail and creative art studio spaces facing the river.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Block 76 West—the project formerly known as Sideyard—which is “being squeezed into hot spot“*.

In a 4-0 vote, the Portland City Council took a tentative vote to approve revised designs for the Fremont Place ApartmentsThe Pearl District Neighborhood Association had previously voted to drop their opposition to the project.

Longtime Central Eastside developer Beam has been picked to lead the redevelopment of the ODOT Blocks, reports the Oregonian.

According to the Oregonian Blue Star Donuts will open a “massive new downtown Portland flagship” in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Oregonian published images of what the MLB stadium proposed as part of the Portland Diamond Project could look like.

Foundation work is underway on 250 Taylor, which will be the new home for NW Natural. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress to date.

The Portland Tribune reported that ‘World-class’ Portland school rebuilds are still planned despite $100M funding gap.

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Weekly Roundup: PSU Viking Pavilion, Fremont Place, Providence Park, and more

PSU Viking Pavilion

Construction has wrapped up on the PSU Viking Pavilion

In a 3-2 vote the City Council re-opened the door for approval of the Fremont Place Apartments, according to the Oregonian.  The Northwest Examiner asked why the issue was all about protecting views of the Fremont Bridge… until it was not?

The Business Tribune reported that the Bridgetown Lofts have been sold to Madison Park Financial Corporation for $55 million.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the affordable housing under construction at NW 14th & Raleigh in the Pearl.

Before its opening last week, the Oregonian had a sneak peak at the PSU Viking Pavilion.

The Portland City Council voted to increase building heights on Old Town Chinatown Block 33 to 160′, reports the Portland Mercury.

Work is wrapping up* on first-phase of Providence Park Expansion, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The second phase is expected in time for the opening of the spring 2019 MLS season.

Portland Monthly looked at Carbon 12the new condo tower that “is both sustainable and seismically strong.”

Portland Architecture talked with Carrie Strickland about the new era at Works Progress Architecture.

The Willamette Week reported that the Oregon ballot measure to fix housing finance prohibition has passed its first milestone.

The Oregonian reported on the Mayor’s conclusion that efforts to aid Portland’s black neighborhoods are an “abject failure”.

According to the Portland Business Journal Hilton has throw open the doors of its newest Portland luxury hotel, The Porter.

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Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

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Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Riverplace, Broadway Corridor, and more

Fremont Place Apartments

The City Council voted down the Fremont Place Apartments over concerns about the width of the Greenway trail

The Portland City Council voted 5-0 to overturn the Design Commission’s approval of the Fremont Place Apartmentsthe Pearl District apartment building opposed by neighbors. Portland for Everyone asked if it this would create an open season for NIMBY lawsuitsCity Observatory argued that Portland doesn’t really want to make housing affordable.

Later that day council voted down a series of zoning amendments that would be necessary for the Kengo Kuma-designed Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward

The Portland Tribune noted that the series of denials added up to the rejection of nearly 3,000 new homes.

The Willamette Week reported that three developers made the shortlist for the redevelopment of the post office site in the Pearl District, known as the Broadway Corridor.

Archinect wrote about the dismantling of the “iconic Portland Building‘s postmodern, multicolored facade”.

BikePortland reported on how the University of Portland’s Franz Campus has puts greenway advocates on edge.

Weekly Roundup: Canopy Hotel, Fremont Place, 5 MLK, and more

Canopy Hotel

A new restaurant named Canopy will open this May in the ZGF Architects designed Canopy Hotel.

Pearl District residents turned out at city council in an attempt to block the Fremont Place Apartmentswrites the Oregonian. The Willamette Week reported that a former president of the Pearl District Neighborhood Association warned that if efforts to block housing are successful the neighborhood “could become an urban gated community for the landed class.”

The Portland Mercury reported that the Canopy Restaurant will open this May in the Pearl District Canopy Hotel.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the demolition of the old OHSU School of Dentistry, which is being torn down with “Jurassic flair“*. The building will be replaced by the new OHSU Elk’s Children Eye Clinic.

The Portland Mercury reported that the decades old Chinese Village restaurant has closed its kitchen. A 20,480 square feet grocery store proposed for the site at 520 SE 82nd Ave was recently submitted for building permit review.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the demolition of the old Fishels Furniture building. It is being torn down to make way for the 5 MLK development.

Architect and City Council Candidate Stuart Emmons is “angling for the anti-development vote in Portland”, according to the Willamette Week.

The Portland Tribune profiled Carrie Strickland, founder and majority owner of Works Progress Architecture.

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Weekly Roundup: KEX Portland, Fremont Place, Jolene’s First Cousin, and more

Jolene's First Cousin

Guerilla Development’s Jolene’s First Cousin intends to provide affordable housing—without government subsidy.

The Willamette Week wrote about Jolene’s First Cousin, a development at 2834 SE Gladstone St that intends to provide housing for formerly homeless individuals, subsidized by market rate rents in the project’s commercial space.

With Portland’s “apartment-building binge appear[ing] to be headed off a cliff” the Oregonian asked whether the city’s inclusionary zoning mandate is to blame.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about The Vivian – KEX Portland, a proposed hostel with a ground-floor gastropub planned at a century-old apartment building at 110 N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

A couple years after artists were displaced from the Towne Storage building OPB asked whether Portland can save it arts.

The Portland Business Journal reported on a groundbreaking ceremony for Riverplace Parcel 3a large affordable housing development planned at the south end of downtown.

KGW reported on the Fremont Place Apartments, a “17-story tower [that] could block NW Portland views“.

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Fremont Place Apartments Approved; Appealed to City Council (images)

The Design Commission has approved the Fremont Place Apartments, a 17 story tower designed by TVA Architects. The 185′ tall building, being developed by the Lincoln Property Company, would include 275 residential units and a ground floor restaurant space facing the Willamette River. Parking for 149 cars is proposed in an underground garage. 481 long-term bicycle parking spaces as also proposed, with 206 provided in a bicycle parking room and the remainder in the residential units.

The Design Commission approval now been appealed to City Council by the board of the Pearl District Neighborhood Association.

Fremont Place Apartments

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Weekly Roundup: New Omni, Portland Boathouse, Overlook apartments, and more

New Omni

New Omni went in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission in December, where it was met by stiff opposition. Should the project move forward it could be the first Central City development go ahead under the city’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance.

The Willamette Week wrote about opposition to new high rises, including the Riverplace Redevelopment, Fremont Place, New Omni and original proposal for Grand Belmont—much of which is coming from residents of nearby high rises.

The Oregonian looked at areas where height could be restricted as part of the Central City 2035 plan. Portland Architecture asked if the view corridor debate is civic activism or NIMBYism?

After 43 years, regulars said farewell to the Overlook Restaurant. The diner is being replaced by the Overlook apartments at 1332 N Skidmore St.

The Portland Tribune wrote about plans for the Portland River Center, which would replace the existing boathouse and add an interpretive center with educational and meeting spaces.

The Portland Mercury wrote about how the Oregon Constitution limits opportunities to leverage the $258 million housing bond passed by voters in 2016.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: 1177 NE 21st, Block 45, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The under construction building at 1177 NE 21st Ave was designed by Hacker architects for PHK Development

OPB reporting on how Portland Art Museum is adapting plans for the Rothko Pavilion in order to win over critics.

According to the Oregonian the bidder that intended to purchase an Alaska ferry for use as a floating hotel at 2260 NW Front Ave has backed out of the deal.

The Willamette Week reported that Lents will get a new craft beer bar with food carts, in a currently under construction development at 9316 SE Woodstock Blvd.

The Hollywood Star News reported on the construction of a seven-story, 162-unit condominium project at 1177 NE 21st Ave.

The DJC published photos of the self storage building rising at 910 SE 7th Ave.

Prosper Portland, the agency formerly known as the Portland Development Commission, struggles to make money from the property it owns, writes the Oregonian.

Portlanders for Parking Reform wrote about how a project at 1717 SE Tenino St will include less affordable housing but more parking spaces, as a result of city regulations.

The NW Examiner looked at conflicting opinions of Pearl District residents regarding views of the Fremont Bridge that would be blocked by the Fremont Place apartment tower, which is currently going through design review.

The Portland City Council approved financing and transfer of the land for Block 45With all 240 units now planned to be affordable, the building will be city’s largest single building affordable housing development in 50 years.

The Portland Mercury reported on how the Republican tax plan would eliminate eliminate private activity bonds, a tool commonly used to fund affordable housing projects across the country.

The Willamette Week looked at a potential conflict between two of Governor Brown’s priorities, timber towers and clean air.