Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Riverplace, Broadway Corridor, and more

Fremont Place Apartments

The City Council voted down the Fremont Place Apartments over concerns about the width of the Greenway trail

The Portland City Council voted 5-0 to overturn the Design Commission’s approval of the Fremont Place Apartmentsthe Pearl District apartment building opposed by neighbors. Portland for Everyone asked if it this would create an open season for NIMBY lawsuitsCity Observatory argued that Portland doesn’t really want to make housing affordable.

Later that day council voted down a series of zoning amendments that would be necessary for the Kengo Kuma-designed Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward

The Portland Tribune noted that the series of denials added up to the rejection of nearly 3,000 new homes.

The Willamette Week reported that three developers made the shortlist for the redevelopment of the post office site in the Pearl District, known as the Broadway Corridor.

Archinect wrote about the dismantling of the “iconic Portland Building‘s postmodern, multicolored facade”.

BikePortland reported on how the University of Portland’s Franz Campus has puts greenway advocates on edge.

Weekly Roundup: Canopy Hotel, Fremont Place, 5 MLK, and more

Canopy Hotel

A new restaurant named Canopy will open this May in the ZGF Architects designed Canopy Hotel.

Pearl District residents turned out at city council in an attempt to block the Fremont Place Apartmentswrites the Oregonian. The Willamette Week reported that a former president of the Pearl District Neighborhood Association warned that if efforts to block housing are successful the neighborhood “could become an urban gated community for the landed class.”

The Portland Mercury reported that the Canopy Restaurant will open this May in the Pearl District Canopy Hotel.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the demolition of the old OHSU School of Dentistry, which is being torn down with “Jurassic flair“*. The building will be replaced by the new OHSU Elk’s Children Eye Clinic.

The Portland Mercury reported that the decades old Chinese Village restaurant has closed its kitchen. A 20,480 square feet grocery store proposed for the site at 520 SE 82nd Ave was recently submitted for building permit review.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the demolition of the old Fishels Furniture building. It is being torn down to make way for the 5 MLK development.

Architect and City Council Candidate Stuart Emmons is “angling for the anti-development vote in Portland”, according to the Willamette Week.

The Portland Tribune profiled Carrie Strickland, founder and majority owner of Works Progress Architecture.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: KEX Portland, Fremont Place, Jolene’s First Cousin, and more

Jolene's First Cousin

Guerilla Development’s Jolene’s First Cousin intends to provide affordable housing—without government subsidy.

The Willamette Week wrote about Jolene’s First Cousin, a development at 2834 SE Gladstone St that intends to provide housing for formerly homeless individuals, subsidized by market rate rents in the project’s commercial space.

With Portland’s “apartment-building binge appear[ing] to be headed off a cliff” the Oregonian asked whether the city’s inclusionary zoning mandate is to blame.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about The Vivian – KEX Portland, a proposed hostel with a ground-floor gastropub planned at a century-old apartment building at 110 N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

A couple years after artists were displaced from the Towne Storage building OPB asked whether Portland can save it arts.

The Portland Business Journal reported on a groundbreaking ceremony for Riverplace Parcel 3a large affordable housing development planned at the south end of downtown.

KGW reported on the Fremont Place Apartments, a “17-story tower [that] could block NW Portland views“.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Fremont Place Apartments Approved; Appealed to City Council (images)

The Design Commission has approved the Fremont Place Apartments, a 17 story tower designed by TVA Architects. The 185′ tall building, being developed by the Lincoln Property Company, would include 275 residential units and a ground floor restaurant space facing the Willamette River. Parking for 149 cars is proposed in an underground garage. 481 long-term bicycle parking spaces as also proposed, with 206 provided in a bicycle parking room and the remainder in the residential units.

The Design Commission approval now been appealed to City Council by the board of the Pearl District Neighborhood Association.

Fremont Place Apartments

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Weekly Roundup: New Omni, Portland Boathouse, Overlook apartments, and more

New Omni

New Omni went in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission in December, where it was met by stiff opposition. Should the project move forward it could be the first Central City development go ahead under the city’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance.

The Willamette Week wrote about opposition to new high rises, including the Riverplace Redevelopment, Fremont Place, New Omni and original proposal for Grand Belmont—much of which is coming from residents of nearby high rises.

The Oregonian looked at areas where height could be restricted as part of the Central City 2035 plan. Portland Architecture asked if the view corridor debate is civic activism or NIMBYism?

After 43 years, regulars said farewell to the Overlook Restaurant. The diner is being replaced by the Overlook apartments at 1332 N Skidmore St.

The Portland Tribune wrote about plans for the Portland River Center, which would replace the existing boathouse and add an interpretive center with educational and meeting spaces.

The Portland Mercury wrote about how the Oregon Constitution limits opportunities to leverage the $258 million housing bond passed by voters in 2016.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: 1177 NE 21st, Block 45, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The under construction building at 1177 NE 21st Ave was designed by Hacker architects for PHK Development

OPB reporting on how Portland Art Museum is adapting plans for the Rothko Pavilion in order to win over critics.

According to the Oregonian the bidder that intended to purchase an Alaska ferry for use as a floating hotel at 2260 NW Front Ave has backed out of the deal.

The Willamette Week reported that Lents will get a new craft beer bar with food carts, in a currently under construction development at 9316 SE Woodstock Blvd.

The Hollywood Star News reported on the construction of a seven-story, 162-unit condominium project at 1177 NE 21st Ave.

The DJC published photos of the self storage building rising at 910 SE 7th Ave.

Prosper Portland, the agency formerly known as the Portland Development Commission, struggles to make money from the property it owns, writes the Oregonian.

Portlanders for Parking Reform wrote about how a project at 1717 SE Tenino St will include less affordable housing but more parking spaces, as a result of city regulations.

The NW Examiner looked at conflicting opinions of Pearl District residents regarding views of the Fremont Bridge that would be blocked by the Fremont Place apartment tower, which is currently going through design review.

The Portland City Council approved financing and transfer of the land for Block 45With all 240 units now planned to be affordable, the building will be city’s largest single building affordable housing development in 50 years.

The Portland Mercury reported on how the Republican tax plan would eliminate eliminate private activity bonds, a tool commonly used to fund affordable housing projects across the country.

The Willamette Week looked at a potential conflict between two of Governor Brown’s priorities, timber towers and clean air.

Weekly Roundup: Riverplace Redevelopment, Cook Security Group HQ, 7 Dees, and more

Riverplace Redevelopment

The Riverplace Redevelopment would include towers of up to 400′ tall.

The Willamette Week broke the news of the potential Riverplace Redevelopment, which could include 2,500 units, with 500 of them priced to be affordable for people making 80% of area median income. The project is being designed by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma & Associates and Portland-based GBD Architects. To move forward the project will require the support of the Portland City Council for an increase in the allowable heights on the site. Mayor Wheeler has confirmed he supports the development.

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the Cook Security Group HQ at 9225 NE Cascades Parkway.

The NW Examiner wrote about the Fremont Place apartment development, and how it will affect views of the Fremont Bridge from the Fields Park.

The 7 Dees garden center at 6025 SE Powell is set to be redeveloped as a 3-story self-storage building, reports the Portland Tribune.

Portland Architecture spoke to Hennebery Eddy Architects founder Tim Eddy on the occasion of the firm’s 25th birthday.

In the past 10 years, the City of Portland has collected $390 million in Systems Development Charges paid by developers, writes the Business Tribune.

Fremont Place Tower receives Design Advice (images)

Design Advice has been offered to TVA Architects for Fremont Place, a 17 story tower planned for a site immediately northwest of Centennial Mills. The building, being developed by the Lincoln Property Company, would rise to a height of 184’-6” and include  270 residential units. Parking is proposed in one or two levels of below grade parking. Ground level retail is proposed facing Naito Parkway, with the possibility (not yet shown in the drawings) of retail facing the Willamette Greenway.

Fremont Place

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Metro Reports: Collective on 4th, Portland Building, 3612 SE 82nd, and more

The first building permit was issued for Core Spaces’ Collective on 4th.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

Design Advice has been requested by SERA Architects for a project at 1715 NW Couch St:

New six story residential project with one level of below grade parking. Project will be 160,000 GSF above grade with 200 units. FAR is 4:1.

Design Advice has been requested by TVA Architects for a project at 1650 NW Naito Parkway:

new 17 story apartment building. 270 residential units are proposed. The first floor will have both residential and parking. There are 192 underground parking spaces. The access for the parking would be from NW Naito. One loading space is proposed. The property will be divided to create a 79,700 square foot site for this development.

Early Assistance has been requested by Urban Development Group to discuss changes to a project at 2548 SE Ankeny St:

Proposal for a new apartment building of 96 units to replace CO 16-198732, no parking.

Early Assistance has been requested by Urban Development Group to discuss changes to a project at 316 NE 28th Ave:

Proposal is to build a new apartment building to replace CO 16-196951 for 119 units and no parking.

Early Assistance has been requested by Urban Development Group to discuss changes to a project at 2789 NE Halsey St:

Proposal is for a new apartment building of 53 units no parking which would replace CO 16-178394.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 3612 SE 82nd Ave:

Project consists of an approx. 8500 SF, single story new core and shell building for up to nine restaurant tenants on property that was previously used as a restaurant. The existing unoccupied building may be demolished. Site work will consist of selective demolition, new infrastructure and parking lot repairs to 15 food carts, seating areas, and required parking.

The rebuild of the Portland Building has been submitted for Type III Historic Resource Review by DLR Group:

Full renovation of an existing 15-story office building including seismic upgrade and replacement of MEP systems. Proposed exterior renovation includes replacement of all existing facade finishes and glazing systems. New building cladding system will sit outboard of the existing building face. Two areas of the existing covered loggia on the first floor are being enclosed and added to the interior building area. No additional impervious surfaceor roof area is being added. This is a historic building.

An excavation and shoring permit was issued the Collective on 4th at 325 SW Harrison St:

partial – site clearing and demolitoin, tree removal, excavation, shoring and erosion control.