Focus: The 25 Most Popular Posts of 2018

Block 216

The 35-story Block 216 tower was approved in December. Our post about the project’s Design Advice Request was our most popular post of the year.

Happy New Year.

2018 is the fourth full year Next Portland has been in operation and I’m excited to see what 2019 brings. I’m currently on vacation in Scotland, so new posts will continue to be sporadic until I return next week.

Last year was another busy year for the site. Of the course of the year 141 new posts were published, with nearly 900,000 page views.

The year started with the last of the pre-inclusionary zoning (IZ) projects working their way through the design review process. In February it was reported by the Portland Mercury that Portland’s inclusionary zoning mandate was getting lackluster results, with only 12 qualifying building in the pipeline.

By the end of the year Next Portland had posted about a number of large post-IZ developments that have been approved through design review. These include 815 W Burnside, 1715 SW Salmon, Nomad, the ART Tower Block 216, 1935 N Killingsworth and the Pepsi Blocks. The Portland Housing Bureau now estimates that there are 43 projects subject to inclusionary zoning in the pipeline, with 362 affordable units in projects that have permits or are close to permitting.

Despite the uptick in post-IZ proposals, new design review and building permit applications remain down relative to years ago. At the end of the year the Bureau of Development Services was forced to lay off staff for the first time since the recession, citing “quite sobering” forecasts.

Similarly to 2017, many of the most popular posts were published in previous years, a reflection of the fact that the content Next Portland remains relevant for a long time, as buildings move through construction and into occupancy. One post in the top 25 most popular posts was from 2015; seven posts were from 2016; six posts were from 2017; and eleven were published in 2018.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Pepsi Blocks, Las Adelitas, Old Portland Holdouts, and more

Las Adelitas at 6723 N Killingsworth St, designed by Salazar Architect for Hacienda CDC, will include 140 units of affordable housing.

The infamous Sugar Shack strip club at in Cully will be demolished to make way for 140 units of affordable housing at Las Adelitas, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reports that the Portland is weighing a new strategy for how spend the funds from the 2016 affordable housing bond, following voter approval of Measure 102. The change could affect plans for 3000 SE Powell Blvd and 5827 NE Prescott St, two sites the Housing Bureau had intended to develop itself. The sites may now be turned over to outside affordable housing developers.

The Design Commission has approved the masterplan* for the Pepsi Blocksreports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The development could include up 1,297 units across the five acre site.

The Buiness Tribune wrote about four Old Portland holdouts, where new development surrounds existing buildings: the Field Officewhich wraps around the Dockside Saloon; Fire District No. 3, which formerly housed Touché and is now being incorporated in the Modera Glisanthe Dandy Warhols’ Odditorium, which sits on the remaining quarter block not occupied by the Broadstone Revealand the Auditorium Buildingwhich will be surrounded by 250 Taylor office building and the Hyatt Unbound hotel.

Portland Architecture interviewed Kyle Anderson of GBD Architects, whose projects include Hassalo on Eighth, Oregon Square and Block 216.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Jupiter Hotel Expansion, ROSE/APANO Mixed Use, Amazon HQ 2, and more

A ground breaking ceremony was held for SERA Architects’ ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development at SE 82nd & Division. The building will include 48 residential units and commercial space.

Eater Portland reported that Dig A Pony co-owners have announced a new bar inside the Jupiter Hotel Expansion.

The Oregonian looked at Portland’s proposal to Amazon for its second headquarters project. Sites identified as available for development include the Post Office Site and the Ankeny Blocks.

Taller buildings in downtown Portland were called “inevitable” in a KATU report.

The first tenants for the Field Office have been announced, reports The Oregonian. The Children’s Garden and marketing agency Adpearance will move into the development, currently under construction on NW Front Ave.

Weekly Roundup: 3000 SE Powell, Laurel 42, Lloyd Center, and more

Lloyd West Anchor Remodel

Work has wrapped up on the original scope of the Lloyd Center remodel, however future phases will now include repurposing the anchor building formerly occupied by Nordstrom.

The DJC reported that unreinforced masonry building owners are fuming over a mandatory seismic retrofit proposal*.

Portland For Everyone interviewed “Surly Urbanist” Jamaal Green about building a pro-housing political alliance.

The Business Tribune reported on a study that ranks Portland No. 21 out of 50 metro areas in terms of hardest cities to add necessary new apartments.

According to the Willamette Week, the Portland Housing Bureau will purchase a property at 3000 SE Powell Blvd, which could be developed into as many as 300 units of affordable housing.

Oregon could “lose $80 million a year in federal housing funding in the proposed White House budget”, writes the Oregonian.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about Laurel 42, the six story project with mechanical parking rising in Hollywood.

The Business Tribune reported that Pearl West, Portland’s first post-recession office building, has been sold by its developer to LaSalle Investment Management.

The Oregonian wrote about how the Lloyd Center Remodel is a lot bigger than originally planned. The new entry plaza and helical stair opened last week, but will be joined in the future by the West Anchor Remodel and East Anchor Remodel, where a new cinema will replace a portion of the space currently occupied by Sears.

The DJC published construction photos of the Field Officecurrently rising in Northwest Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Hawthorne 31, Hi-Lo Hotel, High Schools, and more

The Hi-Lo Hotel, located in the Oregon Pioneer Building, is set to open at the end of the month. The building is also home to iconic Portland restaurant Huber’s.

Portland voters approved the $790 million Portland Public Schools bond, which will pay for the rebuild or modernization of Benson High SchoolMadison High SchoolLincoln High School and Kellogg Middle School.

At three and a half months into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing program, the Business Tribune looked at the policy’s success so far.

SE Hawthorne now has a second poke bowl restaurant, at the ground floor of the Hawthorne.31 Apartments, writes Eater PDX.

Demolition began on the former Club 21 building, reported the Portland Mercury. The site is being redeveloped as the Jantzen Apartments.

Portland Monthly looked at the Field Office, a “radical new Portland office [that] blends work and nature“.

The Hi-Lo Hotel and Alto Bajo restaurant will open May 31st, according to Eater PDX.

Weekly Roundup: Central Courthouse, Crusher Court, Crane Count, and more

William Kaven Architecture received Design Advice from the Historic Landmarks Commission for Old Town Chinatown Block 33

The team behind Old Town Chinatown Block 33 received Design Advice from the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission. The DJC wrote about the reaction they received*.

BikePortland reported that the bike lanes on NW Naito / Front will be extended from NW 9th Ave to NW 19th Ave, with funding coming in part from the developers behind the Field Office.

Guerrilla Development’s New New Crusher Court will open in February, according to the Hollywood Star News.

Major construction on the Multnomah County Central Courthouse will begin soon, when crews from Hoffman Construction begin excavation, reported the Portland Business Journal.

The Seattle Times reported that Seattle had more cranes on its skyline than any other US city and over twice as many as Portland. Portland nevertheless has more cranes than San Francisco, Denver, Austin, New York or Boston.

The Portland Chronicle reported than deconstruction is underway at the 1889 building at 3336 SE Belmont St, set to be replaced by a new 3 story mixed use building.

Portland for Everyone posted a preview of Portland’s 2017 policy decisions to Open Housing.

The Portland Business Journal that Kurt Fischer Structural Engineering, who are working on The Woodlark Hotel have opened a Portland office to focus on the project and to tap into new opportunities in the region.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Bureau Assignments, Transition at Holst, Projects that Defined 2016, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Portland Japanese Garden Expansion by Kengo Kuma, which Portland Architecture chose as one of the projects that defined 2016

Portland new Mayor Ted Wheeler announced the new City Council bureau assignments, giving himself the Portland Housing Bureau, the Portland Development Commission and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The mayor gave new Commissioner Chloe Eudaly the Bureau of Development Services. The DJC covered the reaction* from some of Portland’s well known developers.

The Portland Business Journal published images of Moovel’s new headquarters inside the renovated Overland Warehouse Company building.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting has opened in the 811 Stark building.

After 25 years in business, Holst Architecture announced a transition in the ownership of the firm.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the sale of an office building at 1500 NE Irving St to Swift Real Estate Partners. A new four story 60 unit apartment building is currently planned on the site of the  building’s surface parking lot.

Portland Architecture wrote about the projects that defined 2016, including: the Swift headquarters at 1638 NW Overton Stthe Japanese Garden expansionPortland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion; Burnside Bridgehead developments Slate and Yardthe renovation of the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway; and many more.

The Business Tribune looked at plans by developer Project^ for the Field Office in Northwest Portland.

Portland Parks & Recreation has begun design work for the “North Reach” of the South Waterfront Greenway. BikePortland looked at the different concepts being studied.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

 

Weekly Roundup: James Beard Public Market, Field Office, 333 SW Park, and more

Interior view of the James Beard Public Market

Interior view Snøhetta’s design for the James Beard Public Market at the Morrison Bridgehead site

Portland Architecture broke the news that the James Beard Public Market will no longer be built at the Morrison Bridgehead site. The market’s board of directors is now investigating other sites. The Oregonian reported that the Morrison Bridgehead site, formerly owned by Multnomah County, is now owned by MMDC Company.

With work underway on the Field Office , on NW Front Ave, The Oregonian reported that developer Project^ “imagines new neighborhood north of the Pearl“.

In Downtown, Project^ are planning a major renovation of a building at 333 SW Park, which will convert it to creative office space with a ground-floor restaurant. While the project goes through the permitting phase, The DJC reported* that the building will be used as a temporary homeless shelter.*

Site work has begun on the Multnomah County Central Courthouseaccording to The Oregonian.

As part of its “Regional Snapshots” series Metro took a look at Portland-area housing costs, and the factors that influence them.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Under Construction: The Field Office (images)

This is an updated version of a post originally published on December 18th 2015.

Construction has started the Field Office, a pair of 6 story office buildings planned for Northwest Portland. The two building development by Hacker architects for developer Project^ will total 304,530 sq ft,  including 7,086 sq ft of ground floor retail space. Landscaping by Lango Hansen will feature prominently in the design, with carve outs at the upper level of the building that create “high parks”. Parking for 355 cars will be provided in a below grade parking garage spanning beneath both buildings. 270 of the spaces will be provided in a mechanized parking system. 96 bike parking spaces will be provided, with adjacent locker rooms.

Field Office

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