Weekly Roundup: Convention Center Garage, 1320 Broadway, Clay Creative, and more

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The Portland Development Commission funded garage proposed adjacent to the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The DJC reported that multifamily design work is waning* following the rush to submit developments before the implementation of the new inclusionary housing rules.

Portland for Everyone said that to ensure Portland’s new anti-eviction rule has teeth the city needs to raise its devastatingly low vacancy rates.

Portland Shoupistas argued that the Portland Development Commission’s plans for new parking garages in Old Town and at the Convention Center Hotel put the agency at odds with the city’s climate action and transportation goals.

Portland Architecture spoke to Restore Oregon executive director Peggy Moretti about changes to state administrative rules that make protecting Oregon’s historic buildings just a little easier.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at the University of Oregon’s new spaces inside the recently completed Old Town building 38 Davis.

Eater PDX reported that Ristretto Roasters have opened in the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway and that Stacked Sandwich Shop is open at Clay Creative, headquarters of online bank Simple.

The Business Tribune wrote about the partnership between Portland Parks and Recreation and ZRZ Realty to deliver a health and wellness-oriented South Waterfront at the Zidell Yards.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Eastside Distilling will not be moving forward with plans for an expansion at 1805 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 38 Davis, two buildings on NE Sandy, 121 SE 146th, and more

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

Portland Shoupistas asked if it is time for Portland to eliminate minimum parking requirements, following recommendations from the White House on how to reduce barriers to housing development .

The DJC wrote about how Ankrom Moisan is rethinking the architecture office*, as they get ready to move into their new home at 38 Davis in Old Town.

The Business Tribune looked at Clay Creativethe new Central Eastside offices on the site of old Taylor Electric building that are now home to online bank Simple.

As Zidell Marine gets works on its last barge, Portland Architecture discussed Portland’s transforming waterfront and wondered if the “gold-hued gantry crane” could be retained as part of future development on the Zidell YardsBikePortland looked into whether the end of barge building could accelerate the schedule for completion of the South Waterfront Greenway path. The Oregonian discovered that “Portland housing officials learned this week how much it’ll cost to buy land from the Zidell family to build affordable housing“–but won’t say yet.

KOIN reported that after 53 years Der Rheinlander restaurant at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd will close in 2017. The property has been bought by developer Venerable Properties.

Directly across the street, at 5036 NE Sandy Blvd, a 6 story apartment building is planned on the site currently occupied by Taco Time, writes the Hollywood Star News.

At Portland Monthly Randy Gragg wrote that is “growing like never before”, and asked “what should we do next?

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave by Home First Development.

A lengthy piece in the Willamette Week looked at affordable housing, and how “City officials have paid little attention to delivering the most housing for the money spent“.

With demolition underway at 1127 SW Morrison St ghost signs were revealed on an adjacent building, for the first time in 93 years. Restore Oregon tracked down newspaper ads for each of the businesses.

The Portland Business Journal showed images PSU students’ $1.3B idea for the Post Office Redevelopment .

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 120 SE Clay, Gateway Action Plan, 14th & Raleigh, and more

120 SE Clay

120 SE Clay, by Ankrom Moisan Architects and Potestio Studio

The Portland Business Journal reported that Simple will move into developer Killian Pacific’s latest building, 120 SE Clay. The new building will be located directly adjacent to the recently completed Clay Creative office building, which is already occupied by the rapidly growing online bank.

The “Yes for Affordable Homes” bond measure is raking in campaign cash, reports the Portland Mercury. The $258.4 million affordable housing bond measure has raised $170,000, according to filings.

The City Council approved the Portland Development Commission’s Gateway Action Plan. The Oregonian reports that new plan will concentrate on the Halsey/Weidler commercial district.

The Business Tribune wrote about Innovative Housing’s first high rise project, at NW 14th & RaleighThe 93 unit is set to go before the Design Commission for approval on September 22nd.

The DJC wrote about how Central City property owners are fighting changes that would see allowable building heights reduced* in parts of Downtown, as part of the Central City 2035 Plan.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

While Portland has long been considered a desirable place to live, it has traditionally lagged its suburbs—Washington County particulary—in income and job growth. Following the recession this appears to have changed. Employers increasingly desire a location in central Portland. As commercial vacancy rates have dropped and rental rates gone up there has been a sudden influx of new office proposals.

The vast majority of these are speculative projects, where the developer starts work on the project without a specific tenant in mind. Only three of the buildings—the Daimler Trucks North America HQ, the Multnomah County Health Department HQ and the Seven Corners Community Collaborative—are planned for a specific end user.

Click through to see our roundup of the major projects going on right now, arranged in no specific order. Where a significant portion of the building will be used for functions other than office, the area of the office floors alone has been given. Note that the area of any building may not be directly comparable to another due to differences in methods for how floor area is calculated.

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Weekly Roundup: 3rd and Taylor, Clay Creative, Centennial Mills and more

3rd and Taylor

The proposed developed at SW 3rd and Taylor by Ankrom Moisan Architects

Restore Oregon announced that they filed concurrent appeals to the City and to LUBA, arguing that the City erred in removing the Albion Hotel and Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple from the Historic Resource Inventory. The buildings are threatened by the development at 3rd and Taylor.

Online bank Simple will be the anchor tenant for Clay Creativeaccording to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The new space will be “nearly double the size of Simple’s current home and will be able to accommodate 500 people.”

Writing about Framework, the proposed 12 story building in the Pearl, the Portland Mercury looked at how the use of wood in high rise construction could “help solve the city’s affordability problem, create living-wage jobs in rural communities, and help save the planet”

The Portland Business Journal reported that the concrete slab for the AC Hotel by Marriott was poured last weekend. The pour included 1,100 cubic yards of concrete, enough “to cover a football field with a six-inch slab.”

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75which has now reached its maximum height. The project is scheduled for completion in mid-2016.

The Portland Development Commission has walked away from a deal with Harsch Investment Properties for development on the site of Centennial Mills, determining that it wasn’t financially viable. Partial demolition is currently underway on the long vacant site. The current demolition work will leave the feed and flour mills in place, but with no plan in place for what to do with them a decision will need to be made in the new year whether to also demolish those buildings.

In a piece on Division Street, KGW looked at how it “got so popular and why the growth is causing problems for people who live, work and dine at Portland’s new restaurant row”.

The Portland Chronicle reported that demolition is likely imminent on two single family homes at 1515 SE 44th, which will be replaced by a four-story mixed-use development with 30 residential units facing SE Hawthorne Blvd.

The changing face of Portland’s Central Eastside

240 Clay

In 1922 Euclid, Ohio adopted a zoning ordinance that included six classes of use, intended to preserve to the village character of the Cleveland suburb. Industry would be kept away from residential uses, and building heights would be limited. While Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City and Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse are probably more famous examples of city planning based on separation of uses, Euclid’s zoning ordinance ultimately became the more influential. A large landowner sued the municipality, arguing that in limiting the development potential of their site Euclid had unconstitutionally deprived them of their ability to develop their site with an industrial use.

The case made it all the Supreme Court. In the 1926 case Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. the court sided with the village, establishing the broad precedent that single-use zoning was permissible. While there are other types of zoning used in the US, the model used by Euclid is by far the most common, and is often referred to by planners as Euclidean zoning.

Around the same time, Portland was writing its first zoning code, firmly based on the emerging Euclidean tradition. The 1924 code didn’t regulate many of the things we now expect to find in a zoning code, such as heights, setbacks or density. It did separate the city into four zones, based on use: Class I-Single Family; Class II-Multi-family; Class III-Business-manufacturing; and Class IV-Unrestricted. Many of the decisions made almost a century ago are still evident in the way Portland is developing today. The 1924 code applied the Business-manufacturing zone to the streetcar lines and arterial roads, while limiting the areas in between them to single or multifamily development. The Class I-Single Family zone was generally applied to the most prestigious neighborhoods, such as Eastmoreland, Laurelhurst, Irvington and Alameda. Plus ça change…

…continue reading our guest post at Portland Architecture.

Metro Reports: Jantzen Apartments, NAYA Generations, Clay Creative and more

The Jantzen Apartments, as presented at Design Advice in 2014

The Jantzen Apartments, as presented at Design Advice in 2014

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of early assistance applications, land use reviews and building permits. We publish the highlights.

THA Architecture have requested Design Advice and scheduled a Pre-Application Conference for a project at 2030 NW 17th Ave, the site where Front 17 was previously proposed:

Proposal for 2 buildings 5-8 floors, ground floor retail and upper floors office space. Underground parking

Design Department Architecture have scheduled a Pre-Application Conference for a building at 1139 SW Morrison St:

New office building – 58,000 sq ft on 6 floors plus 10,000 sq ft basement. Ground floor lobby and retail spaces.

Portland Public Schools have applied for a Type III Conditional Use Review for NAYA Generations at 5205 SE 86th Ave:

Housing (40 residential units) community center and school with xterior central plaza pathways and parking with 5 concurrent adjustments

SERA Architects have submitted the Jantzen Apartments at 518 NE 20th Ave for Design Review:

6-story market rate apartment building with 230 units and below grade parking on a full block site.

A building permit was issued to Orangewall Studios for 4008 SE Division St:

New wood frame 3 story 10-unit multi family housing

A building permit was issued for a building at 4928 SE Franklin St:

Construct new 3 story 6 unit apartment building with associated site work, 24 sf detached covered trash enclosure at nw corner of property***septic decommissioning required. Emick 3/25/15*** septic decommissioning required. Call for inspection 842.

A building permit was issued for a building at 7300 SW Garden Home Rd:

Construct new 2 story building to include 8 apartment units, 2 flow through stormwater planters, bike parking, parking lot upgrades, detached trash enclosure

A series of building permits were issued for a development at 177 NE 147th Ave:

Building 1 of 4 new apartment buildings on 2 lots, 3 story, 12 units, parking lot and associated site work included, detached covered trash enclosure less than 120 sq ft in area

Building 2 of 4 new apartment buildings on 2 lots, 3 story, 12 units

Building 3 of 4 new apartment buildings on 2 lots, 3 story, 12 units

Building 4 of 4 new apartment buildings on 2 lots, 3 story, office on main floor, 2 additional units above

A building permit was issued to Mackenzie for Clay Creative:

New industrial office building with structured parking at lower level and the below grade parking area will also utilize the existing retaining wall, adjacent surface parking lot will utilize the exterior wall of the existing building at the perimeter

 

Weekly roundup: Renata open in 626 SE Main, works starts on 240 Clay and more

240 Clay

Clay Creative

Work has begun on Clay Creativethe Central Eastside office building formerly known as 240 Clay.

Eater PDX reports that Renata Restaurant has opened in 626 SE Main, a converted warehouse that also houses Ancient Heritage Creamery.

The Foster Powell blog wrote about the proposed rebuild of the YMCA at 6036 SE Foster.

The Portland Chronicle reported that 76 apartments units are planned for a site 7400 SE Milwaukie Blvd. The apartments will replace a single family home, a shed and single story commercial structure.

A panel that included Tim Boyle, Andy Bryant and Mark Edlen discussed the future of St Mary’s Academy, which plans to expand its campus to the site formerly home to the University Post Office.

An article in The Oregonian looked at One North, the 3 building office development on N Williams. 

Note: due to the Memorial Day holiday the Bureau of Development Services is closed today. The Metro Reports will likely be published tomorrow.

240 Clay (images)

A building permit is under review for 240 Clay, a new industrial office building in the Central Eastside. The five-story building will include 60,000 square feet of office space and approximately 5,000 square feet of ground floor retail space. The developers of 240 Clay are Killian Pacific, who are also behind the now under construction Goat Blocks project. The architects are Mackenzie.

240clay_img_01

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Metro Reports: Central Eastside offices, Pearl District hotel and more

Couch9

Vallaster Corl’s Couch9, as presented at Design Advice

Every week, the Bureau of Development services publishes a list of early assistance applications, land use reviews and building permits. We publish the highlights.

Carleton Hart Architecture have requested Early Assistance for a project at 110 SW Arthur, planned by Central City Concern:

EA to discuss proposed 39-unit multi-dwelling project with potential height Adjustment

Early assistance was requested for a project at 2601 SW Water Ave. The owner is Kevin Cavenaugh, of Guerrilla Development.

Multi-family building.

Vallaster Corl have applied for a Type III Design Review for their Couch9 project at 115 NW 9TH Ave:

11 Story building

FFA Architecture & Interiors have applied for a Type III Design Review for the Fair Haired Dumbbell, also by Guerrilla Development:

New mixed-use office building with retail use at the ground floor. Six stories with basement parking. Project will include full row street improvements. Stormwater plan will meet BES standards.

The NW Everett Hotel in the Pearl is also in for a Type III Design Review:

Design review for 232-unit, 8-story, mixed use hotel project with 114 parking spaces, with modifications to ground floor window standards and loading space standards.

di loreto Architecture have applied for a Type III Historic Resource Review for an addition to St Michael the Archangel at 424 SW Mill St:

Historic Landmark review of ADA and seismic upgrades, addition and site improvements.

Mackenzie have applied for a building permit for an office at 240 SE Clay. The site is owned by Killian Pacific, the developer behind the Goat Blocks project. A project valuation of $12,935,996 was listed.

New industrial office building with structured parking at lower level and the below grade parking area will also utilize the existing retaining wall, adjacent surface parking lot will utilize the exterior wall of the existing building at the perimeter