Weekly Roundup: 1715 NW 17th, Culinary Corridor, Weatherly Building, and more

The former Premier Gear & Machine Works building is being converted to creative office space by LRS Architects and Sturgeon Development Partners.

With the pending construction of Block 216 set to displace the 10th and Alder food carts, the city is studying the possibilities for a ‘Culinary Corridor’*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how an old gear and machine works factory at 1715 NW 17th Ave will become some of Portland’s newest creative office space.

The Oregonian wrote about the 12-story tower proposed adjacent to the Weatherly Building.

The proposal to re-legalize duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes throughout Oregon could be undermined by existing private deeds that prohibit anything other than single family homes, writes the Oregonian.

Senate Bill 10, sponsored by Senate President Peter Courtney, would require cities to allow dense development along major transit routes, writes the Oregonian. Portland would be required to allow up to 75 units per acre with a quarter mile of frequent transit, and up to 45 units per acre within a half mile.

Property magnate Greg Goodman objects to Multnomah County’s proposed $4.3 million purchase of a building at 333 SW Park Ave, according to the Willamette Week.

BikePortland asked whether the Oregon Department of Transportation’s I-5 Rose Quarter plan is compatible with the Albina Vision. In the Business Tribune architecture critic Brian Libby argued for making the vision a reality.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Andrea Durbin, executive director of the Oregon Environmental Council, is set to be the new director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

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