Weekly Roundup: Inclusionary Housing, FAR Transfers, Cross-Laminated Timber, and more

Framework

The Pearl District Framework development is set to break ground soon, but some environmental groups have concerns.

One year into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing program the Portland Mercury reported that the program is getting “lackluster results“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on a proposed change to the Inclusionary Housing program, that would affect condominiums*. According to Hoyt Street Properties the new regulations would cause them to “sell [their] remaining land or build office (space) instead”.

The Artists Repertory Theatre has been rescued by a $7 million anonymous donation, according to the Willamette Week. The company still however plans to sell half their block at 1515 SW Morrison St to a developer that intends to build a 218-foot residential tower on the site.

OPB wrote about a proposal by City Commissioner Fritz to amend the Central City 2035 Plan to allow Floor Area Ratio (FAR) transfers from the Open Space zone.

One year after a devastating explosion, the Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the reconstruction of the Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan St.

The Willamette Week reported that a coalition of environmental groups is criticizing the use of cross-laminated timber on the soon-to-break-ground Framework building.

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Weekly Roundup: Lloyd East Anchor, 1515 SW Morrison St, Framework, and more

The new theater at the Lloyd Center, designed by LDA Design Group, is set to go in front of the Design Commission later this month.

The Oregonian confirmed that the Lloyd Center Sears will close. The Lloyd East Anchor Remodel project will replace the store with a new 14 screen theater.

The Willamette Week reported that the affordable housing at Framework, the Pearl District cross-laminated timber tower, will come at a high price.

In order to pay down debt the Artists Repertory Theatre plans to sell half of its property at 1515 SW Morrison St to a developer of a 218-foot residential tower with 296 units, writes the Willamette Week.

The Business Tribune reported that The Thornton apartments, previously known as the Tess O’Brien Apartments have been sold to San Diego based commercial real estate investment firm SENTRE.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Chinatown, Framework, Lloyd Center, and more

Framework will include ground floor retail space, 5 floors of office space and 5 floors of affordable housing.

The Oregonian took a look at the transformation planned for the Lloyd Center and surrounding blocks, including the NE Multnomah Plaza,  West Anchor Remodel, East Anchor Remodel, 1400 NE Multnomah and 1510 NE Multnomah.

New design guidelines for the New Chinatown Japantown Historic District will go in front of City Council for approval later this year. The DJC looked at how the guidelines aim to preserve a Chinatown that is unlike others*.

An appeal of the Historic Landmarks Commission’s approval of Pearl East will go before City Council on Wednesday, reports the NW Examiner. The approval is being challenged by a neighbor who believes the building is too tall for the NW 13th Avenue Historic District.

Jordan Schnitzer will give PSU $5 million to open an art museum in Neuberger Hallreports the Oregonian.

A building permit is ready to issue for Frameworkreports Dezeen. The Pearl District tower will be the tallest timber high rise in the USA when it is completed.

The Oregon Convention Center is planning a renovation that will complement the Convention Center Hotelaccording to the Business Tribune. Work will include a major remodel of the existing plaza at NE Holladay and MLK. Construction on the Hyatt Regency branded hotel is expected to start this summer.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Providence Park, Karl Miller Center, Madison High School, and more

The proposed 4,000 seat expansion of Providence Park

The Portland Timbers released images of the Providence Park Expansion , which the Portland Mercury noted is “influenced by the iconic near-vertical stands at La Bombonera in Buenos Aires and the Shakespearean Globe Theater in London.”

The Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s 2017 State of the City Design Report.

The Oregonian wrote about how Oregon is pushing for wooden skyscrapers, including Carbon12 and Framework, to revive the state’s timber industry.

As the Portland City Council approved tax breaks for seven new buildings, in exchange for affordable housing, The Oregonian reported that Commissioner Nick Fish questioned whether the proposals go far enough. The exemptions were granted for Con-way Block 290, 2216 NW Pettygrove St, SW Park and Columbia, SW 3rd & Ash, The Atomic Orchard Lofts at 2520 NE Sandy Blvd, Old Town Chinatown Block 33, and Woody Guthrie Place at 5728 SE 91st Ave.

BikePortland reported that amid stiff opposition, the city council ordinance required for the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion was placed on hold.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how PSU is on the final stretch of work on the Karl Miller Centerthe expansion of renovation of the university’s School of Business Administration.

The Portland Tribune reported on an error by Portland Public Schools that resulted in the award of a design contract for the Madison High School Modernization to a firm that scored lower in the evaluation process.

Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

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Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Metro Reports: Framework, George Besaw Apartments, Block 45, and more

Block 45

Block 45, as presented to the Design Commission in October of this year

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested by Jones Architecture for a project at 8608 N Lombard St:

New mixed-use building.

Early Assistance has been requested by Portland Parks and Recreation for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center at 4315 NW St Helens Rd:

Proposal at Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center. Planned improvements: 1) nature center with restrooms, 2)access drive and parking with ada spaces and bus parking; 3) trailhead and accessible pathways connect to forest park;4) street frontage improvements

Early Assistance has been requested by DECA Architecture for a project at 10414 NE Halsey St:

Proposal is to transform this two level structure (which is currently a hardware store and saddle shop with apartment unit on second level) to an urban winery with production, tasting room, offices and storage areas. Apartment unit with minor upgrades will stay as is.

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled by Abbasi Design Works for a renovation of the Old Fire Station Property at 510 NW 3rd Ave:

Proposal is to renovate the existing historic fire station landmark building to retail and office space and construction of new on-grade parking.

A project at 2014 SE 11th Ave has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

New four story 26,500 gsf building providing 34 apartment units and 1,771 sf of retail space on the ground level.A central apartment entry courtyard is proposed to be shared as a ped/public amenity.

Block 45 has been submitted for Type III Design Review by LRS Architects and Lever Architecture:

Proposal is for a new 12-story building with 7,500 square feet of ground floor retail and approximately 240 residential units. Project is a mix of affordable and market rate housing. No parking is proposed.

A project at 1332 N Skidmore St has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Holst Architecture:

2 new mixed-use buildings, 158 apartment units, 59 parking spaces with underground parking. 2 mods requested: parking area setbacks and landscaping; standards for all bicycle parking.

A project at 525 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

Proposal is for new construction of a six story building above ground with two levels of underground parking. There will be five levels of office space above one level of retail or restaurant use.

A project at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave has been submitted for building permit review by William Wilson Architects:

New 4-story wood framed mixed use building including 232 unit apartment building with basement garage, and site improvement, interior trash room, shell commercial space(potential future restaurant)

Framework at 430 NW 10th Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 12-story, mixed-use building; five floors of office and five floors of residential over ground floor retail; see comments re: review by State of Oregon Building Codes Division;

An excavation and shoring permit for the Oregon Convention Center Hotel has been submitted for review:

Excavation and shoring, underground utilities, stuctural foundations, vertical structure only, vertical fire protection standpipe at stairs

A building permit was issued to GBD Architects for the George Besaw Apartments at 2323 NW Savier St:

New construction of new mixed use 4 story apartment building containing 51 residential units, with retail and services on the ground floor

A building permit was issued for a project at 9779 SE Market St:

New building with atrium, offices for administration and music department; music area includes auditorium, music and choir classrooms, and restrooms with storage area at mezzanine level; administrative office area includes reception area, offices, conference rooms, restrooms, mezzanine level above includes larger conference room, alumni center and current storage area

 

Weekly Roundup: Roosevelt High School, 1500 SW Taylor, OMSI Masterplan, and more

Roosevelt High School, which is currently in the middle of a major rebuild designed by Bassetti Architects

Roosevelt High School, which is currently in the middle of a major rebuild, to designs by Bassetti Architects

The Portland Business Journal reported that Norweigan-American architecture firm Snøhetta has been selected to develop a masterplan for the 16 acre OMSI campus.

The Portland Chronicle reported that the Holman House in Goose Hollow has been demolished. An 11 story residential development has been submitted for the site at 1500 SW Taylor St.

Construction of the Jantzen Apartments may not mean the end to dive bar Club 21. According to the Portland Mercury the bar might be moving—building and all.

The DJC looked at construction progress at Roosevelt High Schoolwhich has stayed open during the $92 million rebuild*.

An opinion piece by the Portland Business Alliance, published in the Portland Tribune, argued in favor of passage of Portland’s $258.4 million affordable housing bond measure.

The Business Tribune that the Cross-Laminated Timber panels that will be used at Framework have passed fire tests.

Portland Architecture looked at what Portland’s next big moves should be.

An analysis of ridership trends for the Portland Streetcar showed that for every new housing unit built, the streetcar gains another rider.

With housing prices growing rapidly, Strong Towns asked “what’s the matter with Portland?

The Business Tribune looked at what the future might hold for the Zidell Yards in South Waterfront.

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