Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Metro Reports: Framework, George Besaw Apartments, Block 45, and more

Block 45

Block 45, as presented to the Design Commission in October of this year

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested by Jones Architecture for a project at 8608 N Lombard St:

New mixed-use building.

Early Assistance has been requested by Portland Parks and Recreation for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center at 4315 NW St Helens Rd:

Proposal at Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center. Planned improvements: 1) nature center with restrooms, 2)access drive and parking with ada spaces and bus parking; 3) trailhead and accessible pathways connect to forest park;4) street frontage improvements

Early Assistance has been requested by DECA Architecture for a project at 10414 NE Halsey St:

Proposal is to transform this two level structure (which is currently a hardware store and saddle shop with apartment unit on second level) to an urban winery with production, tasting room, offices and storage areas. Apartment unit with minor upgrades will stay as is.

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled by Abbasi Design Works for a renovation of the Old Fire Station Property at 510 NW 3rd Ave:

Proposal is to renovate the existing historic fire station landmark building to retail and office space and construction of new on-grade parking.

A project at 2014 SE 11th Ave has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

New four story 26,500 gsf building providing 34 apartment units and 1,771 sf of retail space on the ground level.A central apartment entry courtyard is proposed to be shared as a ped/public amenity.

Block 45 has been submitted for Type III Design Review by LRS Architects and Lever Architecture:

Proposal is for a new 12-story building with 7,500 square feet of ground floor retail and approximately 240 residential units. Project is a mix of affordable and market rate housing. No parking is proposed.

A project at 1332 N Skidmore St has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Holst Architecture:

2 new mixed-use buildings, 158 apartment units, 59 parking spaces with underground parking. 2 mods requested: parking area setbacks and landscaping; standards for all bicycle parking.

A project at 525 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

Proposal is for new construction of a six story building above ground with two levels of underground parking. There will be five levels of office space above one level of retail or restaurant use.

A project at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave has been submitted for building permit review by William Wilson Architects:

New 4-story wood framed mixed use building including 232 unit apartment building with basement garage, and site improvement, interior trash room, shell commercial space(potential future restaurant)

Framework at 430 NW 10th Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 12-story, mixed-use building; five floors of office and five floors of residential over ground floor retail; see comments re: review by State of Oregon Building Codes Division;

An excavation and shoring permit for the Oregon Convention Center Hotel has been submitted for review:

Excavation and shoring, underground utilities, stuctural foundations, vertical structure only, vertical fire protection standpipe at stairs

A building permit was issued to GBD Architects for the George Besaw Apartments at 2323 NW Savier St:

New construction of new mixed use 4 story apartment building containing 51 residential units, with retail and services on the ground floor

A building permit was issued for a project at 9779 SE Market St:

New building with atrium, offices for administration and music department; music area includes auditorium, music and choir classrooms, and restrooms with storage area at mezzanine level; administrative office area includes reception area, offices, conference rooms, restrooms, mezzanine level above includes larger conference room, alumni center and current storage area

 

Weekly Roundup: Roosevelt High School, 1500 SW Taylor, OMSI Masterplan, and more

Roosevelt High School, which is currently in the middle of a major rebuild designed by Bassetti Architects

Roosevelt High School, which is currently in the middle of a major rebuild, to designs by Bassetti Architects

The Portland Business Journal reported that Norweigan-American architecture firm Snøhetta has been selected to develop a masterplan for the 16 acre OMSI campus.

The Portland Chronicle reported that the Holman House in Goose Hollow has been demolished. An 11 story residential development has been submitted for the site at 1500 SW Taylor St.

Construction of the Jantzen Apartments may not mean the end to dive bar Club 21. According to the Portland Mercury the bar might be moving—building and all.

The DJC looked at construction progress at Roosevelt High Schoolwhich has stayed open during the $92 million rebuild*.

An opinion piece by the Portland Business Alliance, published in the Portland Tribune, argued in favor of passage of Portland’s $258.4 million affordable housing bond measure.

The Business Tribune that the Cross-Laminated Timber panels that will be used at Framework have passed fire tests.

Portland Architecture looked at what Portland’s next big moves should be.

An analysis of ridership trends for the Portland Streetcar showed that for every new housing unit built, the streetcar gains another rider.

With housing prices growing rapidly, Strong Towns asked “what’s the matter with Portland?

The Business Tribune looked at what the future might hold for the Zidell Yards in South Waterfront.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)

The Portland Design Commission has approved Framework, a Cross Laminated Timber building that is likely to become the tallest mass timber building in the USA. The 11 story, 142′-2″ tall building by Lever Architecture will include 31,260 sq ft of office space on levels 2 to 6, and 60 apartments on levels 7-11. The apartment units, operated by Home Forward, will all be reserved for those earning less than 60% of area median family income. The developer for the building is Project^, acting for the owner Beneficial State Bank. 69 bicycle parking spaces will be provided on the ground floor of the building, and 40 in the studio apartments above. No vehicular parking spaces are proposed.

Framework

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Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)

The Design Commission has reviewed Framework, a Cross Laminated Timber building that is likely to become the tallest mass timber building in the USA. The 11 story, 142′-2″ tall building by Lever Architecture will include 31,260 sq ft of office space on levels 2 to 6, and 60 apartments on levels 7-11. The apartment units, operated by Home Forward, will all be reserved for those earning less than 60% of area median family income. The developer for the building is Project^, acting for the owner Beneficial State Bank. 69 bicycle parking spaces will be provided on the ground floor of the building, and 40 in the studio apartments above. No vehicular parking spaces are proposed.

Framework

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Weekly Roundup: Lennox Apartments, NE Alberta & MLK, Fair Haired Dumbbell, and more

Lennox Apartments

The Lennox Apartments at SE 52nd and Holgate

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 64 apartments coming to a “long-dormant corner of Southeast Portland”. The Lennox Apartments at 4455 SE 52nd Ave will also include 3,500 sq ft of ground floor retail space, which will be outfitted for a restaurant.

With the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project (DOZA) getting underway, the DJC wrote about how “development has overloaded the system“*.

Places Over Time wrote about the dialog between two buildings that are about to go up on the same block in the Pearl: Framework and the Canopy Hotel.

Portland Architecture covered a talk given by Lever Architecture’s Thomas Robinson about Framework. The 12 story will be constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, which it make it the tallest mass timber building in the USA.

Oregon Business reported that winners of a recent Cross Laminated Timber contest included Framework and Carbon12.

According to The Oregonian, Natural Grocers won’t open at NE Alberta & MLK until February 2018—almost a full year later than expected.

The Portland Business Journal had a closer look at the next 689 apartments coming to the Lloyd District. The development at 1400 NE Multnomah recently had its first full Design Review hearing.

The New York Times wrote about the Fair Haired Dumbbella project that “keeps it funky, with design and funding“.

The Boys & Girls Club in Westmoreland has been sold, according to the Portland Business Journal. The building at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave will be replaced with a new mixed use development.

Plans are moving forward for an office and hotel development in downtown, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects at 3rd and Taylor and 3rd and Salmon respectively will bring 175,000 sq ft of office space and 20 story hotel to Downtown Portland. Demolition permits have now been filed for the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

Construction was recently completed at the Cosmopolitan on the ParkBisnow reports that the Pearl district high rise was 96% sold prior to completion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Residential Infill Project, $250 million housing bond and more

Image of a potential "north end party deck" at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Image of a potential “north end party deck” at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Veterans Memorial Coliseum was declared a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Described by Curbed in article about the designation as “one of the finest International-Style civic buildings in the west”, the fate of the building remains unclear. A report published last year identified a number of options for the building, ranging from demolition to major improvements, however the Portland City Council has yet to take any action on the report.

As work on the Residential Infill Project wraps up, the Oregonian reported that Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is readying their recommendations for changes to the Zoning Code. Developers “would be required to reduce the scale of homes they build in Portland’s single-family zones and would be allowed to construct more duplexes, triplexes and other forms of so-called ‘middle housing’.”

The Portland Chronicle reported on the ten story building at 1500 SW Taylor St, likely to replace the 1892 Holman House in Goose Hollow.

BikePortland broke that the news that Tesla Motors will build a missing section of the Willamette Greenway Trail, as part of their new showroom and repair center at 4330 SW Macadam. Initial plans submitted to the City indicated that they would not build the trail.

The Portland Development Commission will own a new mixed income building in Lents Town Center at 9101 SE Foster Rd. The public agency is taking over development from the original owner, Williams & Dame.

The City Council is getting ready to ask voters to approve a $250 million bond measure, to fund affordable housing. If approved, the measure would add $75 a year to the taxes owed on a typical single family home.

Central City Concern published a blog post about their current affordable housing developments. Miracles Central is scheduled to open in August of this year, with the Hill Park Apartments at 110 SW Arthur following in Spring of 2017.

Bloomberg wrote about D.R. Johnson, the Riddle, OR company that is the first domestic manufacturer of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT is new to the United States, but has a long history of use in Europe. Current CLT projects in Portland include Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

KGW had a sneak peak inside the nearly complete Yard tower at the Burnside Bridgehead.

The Oregonian reviewed a Portland Art Museum exhibition about Portland-based Allied Works Architecture.

Weekly Roundup: Bridgetown, Fern Grove, Langano Apartments and more

Framework

LEVER Architecture’s Framework will be a 12 story tall timber building.

In ‘Death of a Mall Rat‘ the Portland Mercury wrote about the Lloyd Center, which is currently in the middle of a major remodel. As Portland changes, the paper wondered whether the 1960s mall can keep up.

Commissioner Dan Saltzman is proposing a 1% Construction Excise Tax, according to The Oregonian. The City’s ability to impose the tax was made possible by a recent change in Oregon law. The law requires that at least 50% of the revenues from the tax be used for providing affordable housing. Commissioner Saltzman, who oversees the Portland Housing Bureau, wishes to see 100% of the tax dedicated to affordable housing.

In a blog post the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis explained that “housing does filter”. New construction that is that the top end of the market eventually becomes much lower priced relative to the overall housing market.

The Portland Tribune reported that a panel of state economists and housing experts told a State legislative committee that a “confluence of factors — including low supply, high demand, obstructive regulations and lacking infrastructure — is driving up housing prices in the state”.

Portland Shoupistas wondered if the City Council will impose “rent-raising minimum requirements in NW PDX?” A proposal to add parking minimums in the Northwest Plan District was recently rejected by the Planning & Sustainability Commission, however NW neighbors are trying convince the City Council to add them back at a July 6th hearing.

The Oregonian wrote about the ‘Portland for Everyone’ housing coalition, which is “calling on Portland leaders to increase density in single-family residential neighborhoods, strengthen renter protections and put a general obligation bond on November’s ballot that would fund affordable housing.”

The Portland Business Journal wrote that the 12 story timber framed tower Framework (pictured above) is moving forward—and with a deeper level of affordability. The 60 units in the mixed use building were originally planned to be offered to people earning less than 80% of area Median Family Income. The units will now be offered to people earning less than 60% area MFI. The building is set to go before the Design Commission on July 7th.

The Oregonian covered a report by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, which found that the hourly wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Oregon rose from $16.61 hourly wage in 2015 to $19.38 in 2016.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the office space at the Park Avenue West tower is now nearly all taken. The residential leasing is proceeding more slowly, with only a quarter of the units taken. In a separate interview with the paper TMT Development president Vanessa Sturgeon states that she’s “just fine” with the pace that units are leasing at.

A post at Planetizen asked if Portland has “lost is way”. The article argues that “Oregon’s poster child for livable planning is embroiled in new controversies over destructive growth, skyrocketing prices, and back-room cronyism.”

The Hollywood Star News reported that construction is about to start on the Bridgetown Apartments at the former Red Fig property in Beaumont Village. The project by Ethos Development and Siteworks Design/Build will include 50 residential units and 6,000 sq ft of retail space.

A 33-unit affordable housing complex in East Portland has opened, according to The Oregonian. The Fern Grove apartments at 14232 E Burnside St are set to be affordable to people earning less than 60% of area Median Family Income.

The retail spaces at the Langano Apartments have been leased, according to Urban Works Real Estate. The ground floor of the SE Hawthorne Blvd building will include Poke Mon, a poke bowl restaurant, as well as an M Realty office and Gallery Nucleus, an art gallery featuring a taproom.

The Cook Street Apartments on N Williams Ave have been sold to Boston-based Berkshire Group, for a undisclosed sum. The LRS Architects-designed building includes 206 residential units.

KGW reported that Exhaust Specialties at 700 SE Belmont St will close after 65 years in operation. Though no permits have been filed for the redevelopment of the site, an Early Assistance application was received by the City in February for a new self-storage facility.