Weekly Roundup: 140 SW Columbia, Heartline, Iron Fireman, and more

140 SW Columbia St

140 SW Columbia will include 349 residential units, directly to the east of the KOIN tower.

Construction on the 20-story tower at 140 SW Columbia will begin by the end of the year, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reported vacation management company Vacasa has moved into a new home, occupying all the office space at HeartlineThe Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the GBD Architects-designed tenant improvement.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the Iron Fireman building, where a second phase of core-and-shell improvements is wrapping up.

Mayor Wheeler has selected Shannon Callahan as the permanent director of the Portland Housing Bureau, according to the Oregonian. Callahan had been serving as the interim director since 2017.

Hey Love, the ’60s- and ’70s-style fern bar-inspired cocktail joint, has opened inside the Jupiter NEXT hotel, reports the Portland Mercury.

Weekly Roundup: LISAH, Moxy Hotel, Heartline, and more

LISAH Kenton

LISAH (Low Income Single Adult Housing) intends to provide dignified permanent supportive housing at a lower construction cost, using modular construction and shared common spaces.

Happy Labor Day. Because we didn’t do a weekly roundup last week, here are the news articles that caught our eye over the past fortnight.

The Kenton Women’s Village, a tiny home village for homeless women, will have to move by next year. According to the Oregonian Transition Projects has secured the funding for the first phase of LISAH (Low Income Single Adult Housing) , which will comprise of “36 studio and 36 one-bedroom apartments that would rent from $300 to $700 a month.”

Portland Monthly reported on the closure of Nong’s Khao Man Gai original location, to make way for the Moxy Hotel.

Willamette Week reported on Portland’s hotel-building spree, and asking whether visitors can keep up.

QuickFish poke has opened in the Pearl District building Heartlineaccording to Urban Works Real Estate.

The Portland Mercury asked if Portland Inclusionary Housing rule is really hurting developers.

Curbed reported that Oregon “recently approved an addendum to its building code that allows timber structures to be built over six stories without having to acquire special permission”.

Weekly Roundup: 6036 SE Foster, 3rd & Salmon, Canopy by Hilton, and more

The redevelopment of the YMCA on Foster is being designed by Leeb Architects.

We’re back after taking a summer vacation. This roundup covers development news from the last two weeks.

The Oregonian reported that millions in infrastructure costs sank the Zidell Yards development in South Waterfront.

With the main post office in the Pearl now closed, BikePortland reported that the risk to cyclists from right-hook collisions has dropped. The site is set to redeveloped as part of the Broadway Corridor Plan.

The Oregonian took a first look at the newly completed Canopy by Hilton hotel in Pearl District.

Demolition has begun on the former Lotus Cardroom and Cafe, according to the Oregonian. The building is being torn down to make way for the 20-story 3rd and Salmon hotel tower.

The NW Examiner looked into what might happen with ESCO site on NW Vaughn.

City Observatory praised the Portland City Council for reversing its early denial of the Fremont Place Apartments, but noted that the City Council did not approve a zone change for a site at 126 NE Alberta St that would have allowed the construction of 50 below-market, affordable apartments adjacent to the Alberta Abbey.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the redevelopment of the YMCA at 6036 SE Foster Rd, which will combine a full-service daycare facility with 48 new apartments*.

Portland Architecture wrote about Heartlinethe Pearl district development that presents an alternative to the podium typology.

The latest potential buyer for Centennial Mills has plans for plans for condos, a park and affordable housing, according to the Portland Tribune.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Hyatt Place, The Canyons, Heartline, and more

The Canyons

The Canyons will include a Japanese style alley running through the site, where the public can past eleven live/work spaces with storefronts, intended to include essential services for seniors, workspaces for artisans, and other small businesses.

The Oregonian confirmed that Seattle-based developer Vibrant Cities plans to build a Hyatt Place branded hotel in the Pearl District.

The Esco site in NW Portland has sold to a consortium of developers — not including the group behind the Portland Diamond Project, writes the Oregonian.

The New York Times covered Heartline, the Pearl District building that “serves to unite the two halves of the surrounding neighborhood“.

Portland Monthly wrote about The Canyons, new housing concept on N Williams that “aims to change how some Portlanders age“.

The Portland Tribune reported that renovation costs for the shelter at 6144 SE Foster Rd have increased by $1 million.

Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: DeMuro Awards, Heartline, Housing Bond, and more

Mason Erhman Annex / Zellerbach Paper Company Building

The seismic strengthening of the Mason Ehrman building and the concurrent renovation of the annex was given a DeMuro Award by preservation advocacy group Restore Oregon.

Eater Portland reported that Bamboo Sushi sister-restaurant Quickfish Poke Bar will open a second location next year in Heartlinethe Pearl District building formerly known as Block 136.

The Portland Mercury wrote about the Moxy Hotel, the 11 story building which would replace a portion of the 10th & Alder food cart pod.

Regional government Metro is weighing a 2018 bond measure to raise money to build affordable housing, reports the Oregonian.

Restore Oregon announced the winners of its annual DeMuro Awards for excellence in preservation, adaptive reuse, and community revitalization. Projects in Portland that received honors include the Swift Agency Headquartersthe Mason Ehrman Annex and Tower Seismic Strengthening and the Overland Warehouse.

As Portland moves closer to a mandatory seismic retrofit policy for unreinforced masonry buildings, the Portland Mercury reported that affected building owners are asking to be exempted from the city’s mandatory relocation payment law.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability).

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan, showing a possible development scenario approximating future growth in the Pearl District over 20 years (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability). At least two of the sites shown as potentially developable have current proposals on them.

It is just over a year since Next Portland last did a roundup of the tallest buildings planned or under construction in Portland. At that time, we counted 25 buildings over 100′ in height planned. Today we count 40. Given the length of time it takes to complete a high rise building, many of the buildings on the 2016 were also on the 2015 list. Four buildings are no longer on the list this year, due to having been completed: Block 17, Pearl West, the Aster Tower and Park Avenue West. Seven buildings that were still in the design phase last year are now under construction. No building on last year’s list is known to have been cancelled.

Read on to see our complete list. Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. In some cases the heights have been estimated.

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Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)

This is an updated version of a post originally published on October 21st 2015.

Construction has begun on Pearl Block 136, which will be located on the site of the former PNCA Goodman building. The project consists of two buildings separated by a publicly accessible courtyard: a 5 story office building facing NW 13th Ave; and a 15 story residential tower facing NW 12th Ave. Underground parking for both buildings will be accessed from NW 12th Ave, with 211 vehicular parking spaces and 332 long term bicycle parking spaces. The design of the project is by Seattle based architects Mithun, for developer Security Properties.

Pearl Block 136

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