Focus: The 25 Most Popular Posts of 2018

Block 216

The 35-story Block 216 tower was approved in December. Our post about the project’s Design Advice Request was our most popular post of the year.

Happy New Year.

2018 is the fourth full year Next Portland has been in operation and I’m excited to see what 2019 brings. I’m currently on vacation in Scotland, so new posts will continue to be sporadic until I return next week.

Last year was another busy year for the site. Of the course of the year 141 new posts were published, with nearly 900,000 page views.

The year started with the last of the pre-inclusionary zoning (IZ) projects working their way through the design review process. In February it was reported by the Portland Mercury that Portland’s inclusionary zoning mandate was getting lackluster results, with only 12 qualifying building in the pipeline.

By the end of the year Next Portland had posted about a number of large post-IZ developments that have been approved through design review. These include 815 W Burnside, 1715 SW Salmon, Nomad, the ART Tower Block 216, 1935 N Killingsworth and the Pepsi Blocks. The Portland Housing Bureau now estimates that there are 43 projects subject to inclusionary zoning in the pipeline, with 362 affordable units in projects that have permits or are close to permitting.

Despite the uptick in post-IZ proposals, new design review and building permit applications remain down relative to years ago. At the end of the year the Bureau of Development Services was forced to lay off staff for the first time since the recession, citing “quite sobering” forecasts.

Similarly to 2017, many of the most popular posts were published in previous years, a reflection of the fact that the content Next Portland remains relevant for a long time, as buildings move through construction and into occupancy. One post in the top 25 most popular posts was from 2015; seven posts were from 2016; six posts were from 2017; and eleven were published in 2018.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Block 216, The Woodlark, 21 Astor, and more

Block 216

The 35-story Block 216 tower will rise to a height of 460′ and include retail, office space, hotel rooms and residential condominiums.

The Design Commission last week approvedBlock 216writes the DJC. In a late change by the applicant, the tower will now have one less office floor and one more hotel floor, bringing the number of hotel room from 232 to 249.

After years of construction work, The Woodlark hotel, which combines two historic buildings, opened downtown. The Oregonian took a first look inside, and previewed Bullard, ‘Top Chef’ finalist Doug Adams’ Texas-inspired Portland restaurant.

In response to “quite sobering” forecast for Portland building trends, the Bureau of Development Services last week laid off four employees, writes the Oregonian. 

Closed for two and a half years, Taiwanese restaurant Ling Garden has reopened in the the 21 Astor building, reports the Portland Mercury.

Portland is poised to spend revenue from lodgings and rental car taxes on services to help homeless people, reports the Willamette Week. The money is needed to help fill a funding gap in the recently passed Metro housing bond.

Oregon could become the first state to eliminate single family zoning, under a proposal by Speaker Tina Kotek. The legislation would require that allow Oregon cities of 10,000 people of more allow duplexes, triplexes or fourplexes, according to the Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Pepsi Blocks, Las Adelitas, Old Portland Holdouts, and more

Las Adelitas at 6723 N Killingsworth St, designed by Salazar Architect for Hacienda CDC, will include 140 units of affordable housing.

The infamous Sugar Shack strip club at in Cully will be demolished to make way for 140 units of affordable housing at Las Adelitas, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reports that the Portland is weighing a new strategy for how spend the funds from the 2016 affordable housing bond, following voter approval of Measure 102. The change could affect plans for 3000 SE Powell Blvd and 5827 NE Prescott St, two sites the Housing Bureau had intended to develop itself. The sites may now be turned over to outside affordable housing developers.

The Design Commission has approved the masterplan* for the Pepsi Blocksreports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The development could include up 1,297 units across the five acre site.

The Buiness Tribune wrote about four Old Portland holdouts, where new development surrounds existing buildings: the Field Officewhich wraps around the Dockside Saloon; Fire District No. 3, which formerly housed Touché and is now being incorporated in the Modera Glisanthe Dandy Warhols’ Odditorium, which sits on the remaining quarter block not occupied by the Broadstone Revealand the Auditorium Buildingwhich will be surrounded by 250 Taylor office building and the Hyatt Unbound hotel.

Portland Architecture interviewed Kyle Anderson of GBD Architects, whose projects include Hassalo on Eighth, Oregon Square and Block 216.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Block 216, Neuberger Hall, Garlington Center, and more

Block 216

The Block 216 tower had its first Type III Design Review hearing last Thursday. Cart owners have been told they might need to vacate the 10th & Alder lot as soon as May.

With the surface parking lots currently home to downtown food carts being replaced by developments that include the Moxy Hotel and Block 216advocates have called for a ‘culinary corridor’ along the midtown Park Blocks right of way.

The Southeast Examiner looked at the “phantom laundromat” at 2731 SE Belmont St. A building permit for a 5-story 46 unit apartment building on site is currently ‘approved to issue’, however a demolition permit for the existing structure has expired.

As the first buildings subject to the city’s inclusionary housing ordinance come online, the Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how different developers are complying with the mandate*.

Excess land from MAX construction could become affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

The Business Tribune looked at the “projects aplenty” at Portland State University, including the Fourth and Montgomery Building and the Neuberger Hall Renovation.

Lonely Planet wrote about the KEX Portland, the “ultra-chic Icelandic hostel” planned at the Burnside Bridgehead.

Portland Monthly wrote about the Garlington Center, which brings health care and housing under one roof.

Fearing rent control, Portland developers are backing Loretta Smith, reports the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 9747 NE Glisan, Multnomah County Courthouse, Pepsi Blocks, and more

The Design Commission has approved an affordable housing development at 9747 NE Glisan St, designed by MWA Architects for Northwest Housing Alternatives.

The Oregonian reported on the Design Commission’s approval of a 159-unit affordable housing project at 9747 NE Glisan St.

With woonerfs proposed at the Pepsi Blocks and Block 216, the Daily Journal of Commerce looked at the Dutch inspired urban design trend.*

NBP Capital plans to buy and renovate the historic Multnomah County Central Courthouse, reports the Oregonian. The building is being sold for $28 million plus 2 years of free rent to the County.

Hat Yai 2.0 will have vegetables, table service, and elbow room, reports Eater Portland. The Thai restaurant is set to open in the Modera Belmont by the end of November.

The Portland Business Journal reports that Muji has opened a pop up shop to give Portlanders a sneak peek at what’s to come when it opens in the Meier and Frank Building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Block 216 Receives Design Advice (images)

GBD Architects and PLACE landscape architects have gone in front of the Design Commission to present a 35-story mixed use building proposed for downtown Portland. The Block 216 tower would include retail, office, hotel, and residential condominium uses, with a 310 stall underground parking garage. The project is being developed by BPM Real Estate Group.

Block 216 | GBD Architects

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Weekly Roundup: Block 216, The Carson, Rothko Pavilion, and more

Block 216

The GBD Architects designed Block 216 tower would rise to a height of 455′, making it one of the tallest buildings in Portland.

The Oregonian published the latest images of Block 216, the hotel, office and residential tower proposed for the 10th & Alder food cart block. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that the project team faced tough questions from the Design Commission at its second Design Advice Request hearing*.

New construction has sent a flood of new apartments onto the market, leading to a month’s free rent becoming standard, writes the Willamette Week.

The Willamette Week reported that The Carson “appears to be among the first apartment complexes in the U.S. to feature Amazon smart-home technology in every apartment“.

The Portland Art Museum Rothko Pavilion has been redesigned to incorporate an open passage between the Park Blocks and SW 10th Ave, writes the Oregonian.

Portland Monthly wrote about the District Office, the six-story, cross-laminated timber building that “reflects a booming Central Eastside“.

The Overlook Neighborhood opposes new rules for how developers notify neighbors about coming construction projects, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Willamette Week reported that Oregon GOP gubernatorial candidate Knute Buehler opposes the Metro housing bond.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Metro Reports: Hyatt Place, Block 216, Jolene’s First Cousin, and more

Block 216

The Block 216 tower has been submitted for Design Review. The 35 story tower will be located on the block currently known for its collection of food carts.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers July 23rd to July 29th, 2018. 

Design Advice has been requested by Otak Architects for the Hyatt Place at 350 NW 12th Ave:

23-story building including 11 stories for a new Hyatt Place brand hotel with ground floor public uses and 12 stories for a new residential apartment community (approximately 120 residential units total).

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled by GBD Architects to discuss alterations to the Con-way Ad-Tech I building at 2151 NW Savier St:

Proposal is to reposition the existing single tenant office into a multi-tenant office building. This will include plaza redevelopment options, interior demolition and potential exterior skin modifications.

The Block 216 tower at 936 SW Washington St has been submitted for Type III Design Review by GBD Architects:

Full-block building is a 35-story tower with a mix of office, hotel and residential uses. The proposed height is 460 feet. Parking will be configured below-grade in 4 levels. Access for the parking is proposed from SW Washington. The access to the loading dock is proposed from SW Alder St. The floor area is approximately 807,000 square feet above grade and 161,000 square feet below grade. The project will be entitled in accordance with the CC 2035 amendments. Stormwater will be disposed in accordance with City of Portland Stormwater Manual.

A project South of 6836 NE Grand Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Allusa Architecture:

Construct new 3 story 6 unit apartment building with associated site work; new detached trash enclosure under 120sq ft

A building permit was issued to LRS Architects for a project at 5845 NE Hoyt St:

Exterior renovation of existing 4 story multi family; demo and replace existing exterior cladding and windows; miscellaneous exterior improvements

Building permits were issued to Guerrilla Development for Jolene’s First Cousin at 2828 SE Gladstone St:

New two-story building with (2) retail spaces on ground floor and (2) 1-bedroom apartments on second floor. (with 17-237384 CO)

New two-story building (building 2) with (1) retail space on half of the ground floor, concregate living the other half of ground floor and second floor. (with 17-2387371 CO)

 

Weekly Roundup: 10506 E Burnside St, Block 216, TwentyTwenty, and more

Block 216

GBD Architects’ design for Block 216 would rise to a height of 460 and include 35 floors.

Block 216 went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Advice Request hearing. According to the Daily Journal of Commerce the project team “plans to proceed to formal Type III design review in October with a goal of breaking ground in May 2019“.*

An 51-unit apartment complex at 10506 E Burnside St will be the first newly constructed building purchased with funds from Portland’s housing bond, reports the Willamette Week.

The Metro Council voted to send a $652.8 million affordable housing bond to the region’s voters, despite last minute opposition from Washington County Chair Andy Duyck.

Architecture firm West of West published their unselected designs for the ODOT Blocks in the Central Eastside, prepared for developer Lincoln Property Company.

Portland Architecture visited Portland State University’s new “ship in a bottle“, the Viking Pavilion.

As Multnomah County prepares to dispose of the 1914 Multnomah County Courthouse KATU reported that locals hope it is preserved after the sale.

Portland Monthly looked at TwentyTwenty and asked whether Portland’s condo market will make a come back.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Block 216, 525 SE MLK, Portland Diamond Project, and more

Block 216

Block 216 will be 33-story hotel, office and condominium tower.

The Oregonian reported that “Portland’s first ‘5-star’ hotel [is] planned” at Block 216, currently known for the large food cart pod on the site.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the demolition of the Portland Music building in the Central Eastside. The 86-year-old commercial building will be replaced by a new office building at 525 SE MLK.

The NW Examiner reported that the peace deal over the now approved Fremont Place Apartments could be “as contentious as the fight“.

The Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring major league baseball to Portland, is now looking at the Port of Portland’s Terminal 2, according to the Willamette Week. The Oregonian reported that Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and singer Ciara have joined the effort as minority investors.

Metro is poised to refer a $652.8 million housing bond to voters, writes the Oregonian.