Weekly Roundup: Bureau Assignments, Transition at Holst, Projects that Defined 2016, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Portland Japanese Garden Expansion by Kengo Kuma, which Portland Architecture chose as one of the projects that defined 2016

Portland new Mayor Ted Wheeler announced the new City Council bureau assignments, giving himself the Portland Housing Bureau, the Portland Development Commission and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The mayor gave new Commissioner Chloe Eudaly the Bureau of Development Services. The DJC covered the reaction* from some of Portland’s well known developers.

The Portland Business Journal published images of Moovel’s new headquarters inside the renovated Overland Warehouse Company building.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting has opened in the 811 Stark building.

After 25 years in business, Holst Architecture announced a transition in the ownership of the firm.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the sale of an office building at 1500 NE Irving St to Swift Real Estate Partners. A new four story 60 unit apartment building is currently planned on the site of the  building’s surface parking lot.

Portland Architecture wrote about the projects that defined 2016, including: the Swift headquarters at 1638 NW Overton Stthe Japanese Garden expansionPortland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion; Burnside Bridgehead developments Slate and Yardthe renovation of the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway; and many more.

The Business Tribune looked at plans by developer Project^ for the Field Office in Northwest Portland.

Portland Parks & Recreation has begun design work for the “North Reach” of the South Waterfront Greenway. BikePortland looked at the different concepts being studied.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

 

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Weekly Roundup: The Woodlark, 1127 SW Morrison, 5 MLK, and more

Cornelius-Woodlark

Image of The Woodlark hotel, after renovation

Architect magazine released its top 50 firms of the year, with Portland-based ZGF Architects in the #1 place. Also on the list from Portland was Hacker, at #13. In the design rankings of nationwide firms Works Partnership came in at #5, ZGF at #7 and Hacker at #17.

A single story commercial building at SW 12th & Morrison is about to be demolished, reports the Portland Business Journal. The building will make way for the 1127 SW Morrison office building.

The DJC reported on how “Sellwood growth stirs residents“*. Projects planned or under construction in the neighborhood include Spokane.137119 SE Milwaukie, Galaxie Lofts and Sellwood Bridgehead.

Knot Springs Spa & Fitness has opened in the Burnside Bridgehead tower Yardaccording to the Portland Business Journal. The 11,500 sq ft facility “offers monthly memberships as well as services by appointment”.

The Oregonian reported that ‘Top Chef’ finalist Doug Adams will be opening a restaurant named Bullard in The Woodlarkthe Downtown hotel that be created in the Hotel Cornelius and Woodlark building. Existing business Johnny Sole, currently located at the site, will close according to the Portland Business Journal.

City Observatory asked if inclusionary zoning in Portland is “a good way to provide more affordable housing, or will it actually worsen the constrained housing supply that’s a big cause of higher rents?”

The Portland Business Journal wrote that the Portland Development Commission has agreed to spend a further $1 million to demolish the feed mill building at Centennial Mills. Current plans still envision the retention of the iconic flour mill.

An investigation by The Oregonian covered how Commissioner Saltzman withdrew the award of city owned land and funding for Meta Housing’s Creators Collective project, and instead gave it to Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives Inc, for their King Parks project.

The Abigail, the latest affordable housing development in the Pearl, had a grand opening on Friday. The 155-unit apartment building includes 128 units for families making between 30 and 60 % of area median family income.

Places over Time wrote about the latest iteration of 5 MLK in “How I Learned to Stop Being and Architect and Design by Committee.”

The Foster Powell blog wrote about the 131 Units of Housing Coming to Foster at 5811 SE Boise, with more on the way at other sites.

The Portland Business Alliance endorsed the city’s affordable housing bond as an “important part of the equation to address housing affordability in Portland,” reports the Portland Business Journal.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Post Office Redevelopment, 419 SW Washington, NE 106th & Halsey and more

Broadway Corridor USPS

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A 30-story tower by ZGF Architects is planned at 419 SW Washington St, according to The Oregonian. The existing building on the site was recently being used as a temporary homeless shelter, and is now vacant.

The first public hearing of the proposed draft of the Central City 2035 Plan was dominated by concerns about building heights in West End and Goose Hollow, according to an article in the DJC*. Meanwhile, Portland Shoupistas argued that proposed changes related to parking in the plan represent a step backwards.

The Oregonian wrote that up to 1,200 more apartments are proposed on the Prometheus Property in South Waterfront.

Kimberly Branam has been picked as the next executive director of the Portland Development Commission, according to The Oregonian. For the past five years Branam has been second-in-command to former executive director Patrick Quinton.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 54 organizations that are backing the proposed $258M affordable housing bond.

OPB’s “State of Wonder” discussed Yard, the recently completed Burnside Bridgehead tower that has sharply divided the opinions of Portlanders.

The Oregonian discovered the premium that will be paid by the PDC for a piece of land near the airport, necessary to allow the Post Office Redevelopment to move forward.

After 92 years, the Lotus Cardroom & Cafe will close later this month, according to KATU. The bar will be demolished to make way for the 3rd & Salmon hotel tower.

An affordable housing development at NE 106th & Halsey by Gerding Edlen and Human Solutions has nearby residents worried, according to the Mid-County Memo.

The timeframe for the City and ZRZ Realty to agree on the price of a piece of land at the Zidell Yards has been missed, according to The Oregonian.  Under a development agreement signed last year, the City has the option to buy the property at an agreed price, for the purpose of building affordable housing.

The Willamette Week wrote about 5 MLKthe Burnside Bridgehead high-rise that will replace the 95 year old Fishels Furniture building.

Work has begun on the Union at St Johns, according to the Portland Business Journal. The mixed use building will include 100 apartments as well as 20,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Metro Reports: Multnomah County Courthouse, Health Dept HQ, Garlington Center and more

Multnomah County Courthouse

The Multnomah County Central Courthouse has been submitted for Design Review. (Image from presentation to the Design Commission in May.)

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

TVA Architects have requested Early Assistance for a project at 1823 SE 50th Ave:

Proposal for a four story 19 unit apartment building. No parking provided. Existing building to be removed.

Lever Architecture have submitted a project at 3928 N Williams Ave for Design Review:

Renovate building to include retail and commercial/residential uses, and development of 5 story 18,000 SF detached building for retail, commercial/residential uses.

William Kaven Architecture have submitted a project at 4073 N Williams Ave for Design Review:

New 4-story commercial building. Adjustment requested for on-site loading.

The Multnomah County Central Courthouse has been submitted for Design Review:

Replace current Multnomah County Courthouse with new Multnomah County Central Courthouse (MCCCH).

The Multnomah County Health Department HQ has been submitted for Design Review by ZGF Architects:

9-story headquarters building for the Multnomah County Health Department. The building will house public health clinics & administrative offices, and some retail space. See DA 16-116592

Scott Edwards Architecture have submitted the Garlington Center at 3024 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd for building permit review:

Construct new 4 story (52 unit) apartment building with associated parking and landscaping

Holst Architecture have submitted the Asian Health and Services Center at 9005 SE Foster Rd for building permit review:

Construct new 3 story, 29,000 sf office building with ground floor commercial lease space, includes onsite parking and associated site work

A building permit was issued for The Truman apartments at 1525 SE 44th Ave:

New construction-new 4-story mixed use building with retail space on ground floor area and 30 residential units

A building permit was issued for a project at 2005 N Williams Ave (formerly 1931 N Williams Ave):

New five story apartment building with 1 level of below grade parking

A building permit was issued for a project at 424 NE Jessup St (formerly 432 NE Jessup):

Construct new 3 story (12) unit apartment building with associated site utilities

A building permit was issued to Skylab Architecture for revsions to Yard:

REV 05 – Revision to DFS 07 Window wall system to include addition of 20 vision glass modules to the South Elevation and 47 vision glass modules to the West Elevation.

 

Weekly Roundup: N Williams Center, Prometheus Property, Con-way Masterplan, and more

N Williams Center

N Williams Center will offer 61 units of affordable housing, with priority given to “longtime residents and those who have been displaced in the neighborhood”

The DJC reported* on how development fees are stacking in Portland, potentially affecting the viability of projects currently in development.

After two Design Advice Request hearings earlier in the year, Ankrom Moisan Architects’ 1430 NW Glisan has now been submitted for Design Review. The Business Tribune took a look at how the building has evolved.

The Portland Business Journal covered the 64 apartments about to go up on the site of the former Macadam’s Bar & Grill at 5833 SW Macadam.

With a Pre-Application Conference scheduled for development on the Prometheus Property in South Waterfront—which could include 4 buildings, of 200 to 300 apartments units in each—BikePortland wrote that the “dominoes keep falling for a continuous river path in South Waterfront“.

The Portland Business Journal wrote that the affordable housing development N. Williams Center will include 61 units, with a mix that includes “one-, two- and three-bedroom units, as well as a children’s area, gathering spaces, community gardens and a chicken coop.”

The Oregonian reported on the shortlist for the new director of the Portland Development Commission.

With development exploding in and around the Con-way Masterplan area, the Portland Business Journal took a look at completed and planned buildings at the far end of the Northwest District, including the LL Hawkins, Q21, Leland James Building and Blocks 294E and 295E.

The Oregonian wrote about how a conflict-of-interest probe marks the “latest chapter in Yard building saga”.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Residential Infill Project, $250 million housing bond and more

Image of a potential "north end party deck" at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Image of a potential “north end party deck” at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Veterans Memorial Coliseum was declared a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Described by Curbed in article about the designation as “one of the finest International-Style civic buildings in the west”, the fate of the building remains unclear. A report published last year identified a number of options for the building, ranging from demolition to major improvements, however the Portland City Council has yet to take any action on the report.

As work on the Residential Infill Project wraps up, the Oregonian reported that Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is readying their recommendations for changes to the Zoning Code. Developers “would be required to reduce the scale of homes they build in Portland’s single-family zones and would be allowed to construct more duplexes, triplexes and other forms of so-called ‘middle housing’.”

The Portland Chronicle reported on the ten story building at 1500 SW Taylor St, likely to replace the 1892 Holman House in Goose Hollow.

BikePortland broke that the news that Tesla Motors will build a missing section of the Willamette Greenway Trail, as part of their new showroom and repair center at 4330 SW Macadam. Initial plans submitted to the City indicated that they would not build the trail.

The Portland Development Commission will own a new mixed income building in Lents Town Center at 9101 SE Foster Rd. The public agency is taking over development from the original owner, Williams & Dame.

The City Council is getting ready to ask voters to approve a $250 million bond measure, to fund affordable housing. If approved, the measure would add $75 a year to the taxes owed on a typical single family home.

Central City Concern published a blog post about their current affordable housing developments. Miracles Central is scheduled to open in August of this year, with the Hill Park Apartments at 110 SW Arthur following in Spring of 2017.

Bloomberg wrote about D.R. Johnson, the Riddle, OR company that is the first domestic manufacturer of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT is new to the United States, but has a long history of use in Europe. Current CLT projects in Portland include Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

KGW had a sneak peak inside the nearly complete Yard tower at the Burnside Bridgehead.

The Oregonian reviewed a Portland Art Museum exhibition about Portland-based Allied Works Architecture.

Weekly Roundup: the NV, Zidell Yards, Goat Blocks and more

The NV

The NV apartments in the North Pearl by ZGF Architects

The Business Tribune wrote about The NVone of the growing number of residential towers in the North Pearl.

Eater PDX reported that pizzeria Please Louise will be going into the ground floor of the LL Hawkins building in Slabtown.

Urban Land Magazine analyzed how the mix of uses at the Goat Blocks made the development possible.

The Oregonian broke the news that up to 67 windows will be added to the nearly complete Yard tower at the east end of the Burnside Bridge. The cost of the revisions will mostly be covered by the City of Portland, through fee refunds.

ZRZ Realty has hired Thomas Henneberry, “a longtime real estate consultant from the D.C. area” to oversee development of the Zidell Yards, according to the Portland Business Journal. The firm last year received design advice for Zidell Blocks 4 & 6though do not intend to break ground on the buildings until tenants are secured.

BikePortland had a look at the 600 space Lloyd Cycle Station, developed as part of the Hassalo on Eighth project.

The Oregonian reported on developer Gerding Edlen’s plans for a 17 story tower at 5 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. The building would replace the building that has housed Fishels Furniture for decades.

The Business Tribune checked in on the construction progress at the Japanese Garden ExpansionThe new cultural village by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma is expected to be completed in April 2017.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works founder Brad Cloepfil, in advance of a retrospective exhibition about the firm’s work at Portland Art Museum.

The Business Tribune looked at the ongoing restoration of the former Oregonian publishing building at 1320 BroadwayThe renovation is set for completion on June 30th.

New restaurant Q, the successor to Veritable Quandary, will be located in the 2&Taylor building, according to the Portland Business Journal. The former Yamhill Marketplace and Bally’s Total Fitness underwent a major renovation in 2014, and is now home to Jama Software.

The Willamette Week asked whether it is appropriate for the new 2035 Comprehensive Plan to downzone areas of East Portland in the middle of a housing crisis.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting Chinese food pop-up is likely going into the under construction Central Eastside 811 Stark building.

Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability).

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan, showing a possible development scenario approximating future growth in the Pearl District over 20 years (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability). At least two of the sites shown as potentially developable have current proposals on them.

It is just over a year since Next Portland last did a roundup of the tallest buildings planned or under construction in Portland. At that time, we counted 25 buildings over 100′ in height planned. Today we count 40. Given the length of time it takes to complete a high rise building, many of the buildings on the 2016 were also on the 2015 list. Four buildings are no longer on the list this year, due to having been completed: Block 17, Pearl West, the Aster Tower and Park Avenue West. Seven buildings that were still in the design phase last year are now under construction. No building on last year’s list is known to have been cancelled.

Read on to see our complete list. Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. In some cases the heights have been estimated.

Read More

Weekly Roundup: City Club on Affordability, High Demand for Office Space, Inclusionary Zoning and more

Overland Company Warehouse Building

The Overland Warehouse, one of the many existing buildings being converted into creative office space in order to the satisfy high demand for inner Portland office space.

The Oregonian reported that the City Club of Portland released a report calling for “‘action now’ and more than just ‘half-measures and business as usual'” to deal with Portland’s housing crisis. The report recommended lifting the state ban on rent control, banning no-cause evictions and creating a rental property licensing system. The research committee split over whether Portland’s single family neighborhoods should become denser: the majority said that the city should “work to overcome neighborhood skepticism about ‘missing middle housing,'”; while a minority argued that the city should re-zone the single family neighborhoods for greater density.

Portland has started work on how to implement Inclusionary Zoning, according to the Willamette Week. An expert panel has been formed that includes Vivian Satterfield of OPAL PDX, Sarah Zahn of Gerding Edlen, Margaret Tallmadge of Coalition of Communities of Color, and Eric Cress of Urban Development + Partners.

The Business Tribune wrote about two projects that will change the face of inner E Burnside: the Jupiter Hotel Expansionand 7th & Burnside.

Demand for office space in Portland is at record highs, reported The Oregonian. While there are a large number of office projects planned in Portland (as previously covered by Next Portland) many of these are a year or two away from completion.

Oregon Business profiled Jan Bredack, the German founder of ‘Veganz’. The vegan grocery chain is currently looking for locations for its first Portland store, including the under construction Yard building.