Weekly Roundup: Bureau Assignments, Transition at Holst, Projects that Defined 2016, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Portland Japanese Garden Expansion by Kengo Kuma, which Portland Architecture chose as one of the projects that defined 2016

Portland new Mayor Ted Wheeler announced the new City Council bureau assignments, giving himself the Portland Housing Bureau, the Portland Development Commission and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The mayor gave new Commissioner Chloe Eudaly the Bureau of Development Services. The DJC covered the reaction* from some of Portland’s well known developers.

The Portland Business Journal published images of Moovel’s new headquarters inside the renovated Overland Warehouse Company building.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting has opened in the 811 Stark building.

After 25 years in business, Holst Architecture announced a transition in the ownership of the firm.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the sale of an office building at 1500 NE Irving St to Swift Real Estate Partners. A new four story 60 unit apartment building is currently planned on the site of the  building’s surface parking lot.

Portland Architecture wrote about the projects that defined 2016, including: the Swift headquarters at 1638 NW Overton Stthe Japanese Garden expansionPortland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion; Burnside Bridgehead developments Slate and Yardthe renovation of the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway; and many more.

The Business Tribune looked at plans by developer Project^ for the Field Office in Northwest Portland.

Portland Parks & Recreation has begun design work for the “North Reach” of the South Waterfront Greenway. BikePortland looked at the different concepts being studied.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

 

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Weekly Roundup: Parking Minimums, Post Office, ITAP, and more

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A little more than 3 years after the Portland City Council added minimum parking requirements for new apartment buildings, it has voted to remove them, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Post Office site in the Pearl has formally been handed over to the Portland Development Commission, writes the Business Tribune. Development on the site could begin in two years.

According to a report seen by the Oregonian, major problems with the Bureau of Development Services’ paperless permitting system ITAP were “enabled by ‘significant gaps’ in leadership.”

Walker Macy has presented the interim findings for the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Report, writes the Business Tribune.

The buyer of the Macy’s space at the Meier & Frank Building has confirmed their plans to the Portland Business Journal:  ground floor retail with creative office space above.

The DJC published photos of the completed Burnside Bridgehead building Slate.

Construction Dive wrote about The Amy, the 141 unit student-oriented affordable housing now under construction in SW Portland.

Weekly Roundup: Fair Haired Dumbell, AIA Portland Awards, PSU School of Business Administration, and more

Fair Haired Dumbell

The Fair-Haired Dumbell will have a facade painted with a mural by Los Angeles-based artist James Jean

The DJC wrote about the ‘elaborate’ Building Information Modelling (BIM) process* being used to help deliver the PSU School of Business Administration.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the paint scheme has been chosen Fair-Haired Dumbbell building, and “it’s unlike anything else in town“.  They also revealed that co-working company TENpod will occupy 8,000 sq ft in the building.

The Oregonian reported that the Sears building in the Lloyd Center has been sold, and the retailer’s presence in the mall “will either shrink significantly or disappear altogether“.  On Thursday morning, the ice rink at the center of the mall reopened, after a major renovation.

Eater PDX reported that Tom’s First Avenue Bento will close after nearly 25 years, to make way for the Multnomah County Central Courthouse.

The 12-unit Jarrett Street Condos are receiving very little interest from those eligible to receive the city subsidized down-payment assistance, according to The Oregonian.

Portland Architecture wrote about the winning projects at the AIA Portland Architecture Awards. Buildings honored include Slate, 1638 NW Overton St, Framework (CEID), Albina Yard, Karuna at One North, The Cosmopolitan on the Park and Park Avenue West.

Preservation group Restore Oregon announced their top restoration projects of 2016, including the Pine Street Market and the Society Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal showcased the “stellar views and cool workspaces” at Slate.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Rothko Pavilion, Alphabet District Downzoning, 5035 NE Sandy, and more

Rothko Pavilion

The Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion

The Oregonian reported on Portland Art Museum’s multimillion-dollar expansion. The Rothko Pavilion will connect the museum’s two existing buildings, which are currently only joined below ground. Places Over Time took a look at Vinci Hamp Architects’ design for the structure.

The Business Tribune wrote about a request by the Northwest District Association to downzone parts of the Alphabet Historic District, which would reduce the amount of housing that could be built in the area. According to the paper it would “kill” plans to build a 160-unit project at 1727 NW Hoyt St, which “would provide 60 years of affordability for seniors making $15,000 or less.”

The DJC wrote about plans by Oregon Democrats to “introduce a package of legislation next year to lift a ban on rent control and provide new protections to tenants facing eviction.” *

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the developers lining “up to back Portland’s affordable housing measure“.

Despite not having an approved design, a ground-breaking ceremony was held for the Multnomah County Central Courthousereported the Business Tribune. The building is scheduled to go in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission for approval on October 24th.

Venerable Properties has released details of what will replace Der Rheinlander at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd. A new “multi-specialty health care center” owned by The Portland Clinic will be built on the site, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The Central Eastside’s newest coworking space has opened in Slatereported the Portland Business Journal. CENTRL Office will occupy 22,000 sq ft of space across two floors of the Burnside Bridgehead building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Overlook Pointe fire, 10th & Yamhill Smart Park, Field Office, and more

10th & Yamhill Smart Park

Conceptual image of a renovated 10th & Yamhill Smart Park garage (image by FFA Architecture & Interiors)

The Portland Development Commission received three offers for Centennial Mills, according to The Oregonian. All three offers, valued at $1,000, $100,000 and $3.45 million, were rejected. The redevelopment agency will now consider “how/whether to reengage the market”.

The DJC reported that the under construction Overlook Pointe condominium development at 5425 N Minnesota Ave was burned down in a fire* early Wednesday morning.

The PDC voted to sell property at 1053–1201 NW Naito Parkway to The Wolff Company for $9 million. The Oregonian reported that the developer plans to build 340 apartments on the site, 68 of which would be affordable for at least 10 years.

KGW covered the 1,200 apartments coming to the area in and around the Con-way Masterplan area in NW Portland. Construction is underway on Blocks 294E and 295E and the Leland James Buildingwhich are following on from the LL Hawkins and Slabtown MarketplaceImmediately outside of the masterplan area is Q21, which is nearing completion.

The Portland Tribune wrote about the “new mood in Chinatown“, which after decades of divestment might be seeing a change in its fortunes. The Society Hotel opened last year, and will soon be joined by the newly renovated Mason Erhman Building Annex, Overland Warehouse Company Building and Grove Hotel.

The Portland Mercury profiled Swift Real Estate Partners, the San Francisco Investment Firm that is “Snatching Up Old Town Real Estate“. The company’s acquisitions include the New Market Theatera historic building adjacent to the Skidmore Fountain that could receive a significant addition.

Project^’s Field Office will create a “300,000-square-foot urban campus“, according to the Portland Business Journal. Construction recently started on the Hacker-designed buildings at NW Front and 17th.

More than 1,000 people applied for the 65 housing units available to people displaced from North and Northeast Portland, according to The Oregonian.

The City is planning a $25 million renovation of the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park, according to the Portland Business Journal. The scope of the project will include addressing seismic and ADA deficiencies in the existing structure.

Three new surf shops are set to open in the next year, reports The Oregonian. These include Cosube, which will open in Slate at the Burnside Bridgehead, and Leeward Northwest Surf & Sea, which will open in New New Crusher Court at 2450 NE Sandy Blvd.

According to the Portland Business Journal, furniture retailer Room & Board will open next year in the Pearl District’s newly renovated Fisk Tire Company Building.

The Business Tribune wrote about a day in the life of the team at OHSU working on the Knight Cancer Research Building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability).

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan, showing a possible development scenario approximating future growth in the Pearl District over 20 years (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability). At least two of the sites shown as potentially developable have current proposals on them.

It is just over a year since Next Portland last did a roundup of the tallest buildings planned or under construction in Portland. At that time, we counted 25 buildings over 100′ in height planned. Today we count 40. Given the length of time it takes to complete a high rise building, many of the buildings on the 2016 were also on the 2015 list. Four buildings are no longer on the list this year, due to having been completed: Block 17, Pearl West, the Aster Tower and Park Avenue West. Seven buildings that were still in the design phase last year are now under construction. No building on last year’s list is known to have been cancelled.

Read on to see our complete list. Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. In some cases the heights have been estimated.

Read More

Weekly Roundup: Albina Yard, Slate, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and more

4703 N Albina

Construction is underway on the Albina Yard office building, which is using Cross-laminated Timber

Venerable restaurant Besaw’s reopened last week at the LL Hawkins apartment building in Slabtown. Eater PDX published photos of the new interior.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about the demolition of a number of houses in order to make way for a mixed use development at 2301 NW Savier. The new building by GBD Architects will wrap around the building that was formerly home to Besaw’s restaurant.

BikePortland reported that a “gear sphere” sculpture was set to be installed outside the under construction Cook Street Apartments by LRS Architects.

OHSU is in the early stages of planning for a major expansion of the Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal.

The Portland Chronicle wrote about the potential demolition of a building at 3336 SE Belmont St, slated to be replaced by a three-story mixed use building by BKL/A Architecture.

Construction is about to begin on the Works Partnership designed PDX Commons senior co-housing at SE 43rd and Belmont. The site was formerly the location of the Good Food Here food cart pod. As The Oregonian reports more than half of the carts have now relocated across the street to form the Bite on Belmont pod.

As the Pine Street Market gets ready to open The Oregonian published their ultimate guide to the vendors planned for the Old Town food hall.

Portland Architecture published their notes from the Centennial Mills public forum, which explored how the historic building complex might still be saved.

The developers behind 3rd and Taylor have laid out their plans for the block, wrote the Portland Business Journal. The design review package for the hotel portion of the project has been submitted by Ankrom Moisan Architects. The office building is planned to move forward separately in the coming months.

In [mis]representation Places over Time wrote about the tools architects use to visualize their designs, how these can shape the design itself, and how it is easy to present a false sense of reality.

Coworking firm CENTRL Office will expand into the Slate building at the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The 10 story building by Works Partnership is scheduled to open later this year.

Construction is underway at the Lever Architecture designed Albina YardThe 4 story office building is the first commercial building in the United States to make use of domestically fabricated Cross Laminated Timber as a structural element. A video posted last week shows the progress made so far:

Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

While Portland has long been considered a desirable place to live, it has traditionally lagged its suburbs—Washington County particulary—in income and job growth. Following the recession this appears to have changed. Employers increasingly desire a location in central Portland. As commercial vacancy rates have dropped and rental rates gone up there has been a sudden influx of new office proposals.

The vast majority of these are speculative projects, where the developer starts work on the project without a specific tenant in mind. Only three of the buildings—the Daimler Trucks North America HQ, the Multnomah County Health Department HQ and the Seven Corners Community Collaborative—are planned for a specific end user.

Click through to see our roundup of the major projects going on right now, arranged in no specific order. Where a significant portion of the building will be used for functions other than office, the area of the office floors alone has been given. Note that the area of any building may not be directly comparable to another due to differences in methods for how floor area is calculated.

Read More

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of the Year

The Goat Blocks

LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, the subject of our second most viewed post of 2015

2015 is the first full calendar year Next Portland has been in operation, and it’s been a year of huge growth for the site. As the year draws to a close it seemed like a good time to look at what the most popular posts of the year were. If there’s an overall trend evident it’s that posts about tall or large buildings do well. The single most popular post was the round up of the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction. Posts about high rise buildings under construction—including Block 136, The Cosmopolitan, The NV (formerly The Overton), and Yard (formerly Block 67)—feature prominently in the list. The giant development at Oregon Square makes the list three times, and the redevelopment of the USPS site in the Pearl is included three times. The most popular post about a single project covered LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, a superblock development currently under construction in inner Buckman.

Other posts to make the top 25 were more surprising. The list includes the Worldmark by Wyndham and The Society Hotel, both relatively small hotel projects in Old Town. The initial post about 3rd & Taylor likely performed so well not because of the scale of the project, but because Next Portland was the first place to write about the potential demolition of the Hotel Albion. At only 8 stories Carbon12 wouldn’t come close to making the list of the tallest buildings planned for Portland, but is notable for the fact that the high rise structure will be built out of wood.

Were there any posts you particularly enjoyed reading this year? Let us know in the comments. Here is the full list of our most popular posts of 2015:

1 – Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

2 – LOCA @ The Goat Blocks

3 – Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67

4 – Focus: 20 New Hotels Proposed For Portland

5 – Worldmark by Wyndham set to receive Design Advice

6 – Carbon12, an 8 story wood building, proposed for N Williams

7 – Concepts released for redevelopment of USPS site

8 – Pre-Application Conference scheduled for SW 3rd & Taylor

9 – Under Construction in Old Town: The Society Hotel

10 – Cook Street Apartments

11 – Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment returns in front of Design Commission (images)

12 – The Fair Haired Dumbbell

13 – Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75

14 – PDC identifies preferred concept for Post Office site

15 – Block 136 heading to Design Review

16 – Under Construction in South Waterfront: Block 37

17 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton

18 – Design Commission approves Oregon Square

19 –Design Commission reviews Oregon Square

20 – Oregon Square update

21 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park

22 – Design Commission approves The Porter hotel

23 – 4th & Harrison returning for Design Advice

24 – Grand Belmont returns before Historic Landmarks Commission

25 – Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center