Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Convention Center Garage, 1320 Broadway, Clay Creative, and more

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The Portland Development Commission funded garage proposed adjacent to the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The DJC reported that multifamily design work is waning* following the rush to submit developments before the implementation of the new inclusionary housing rules.

Portland for Everyone said that to ensure Portland’s new anti-eviction rule has teeth the city needs to raise its devastatingly low vacancy rates.

Portland Shoupistas argued that the Portland Development Commission’s plans for new parking garages in Old Town and at the Convention Center Hotel put the agency at odds with the city’s climate action and transportation goals.

Portland Architecture spoke to Restore Oregon executive director Peggy Moretti about changes to state administrative rules that make protecting Oregon’s historic buildings just a little easier.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at the University of Oregon’s new spaces inside the recently completed Old Town building 38 Davis.

Eater PDX reported that Ristretto Roasters have opened in the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway and that Stacked Sandwich Shop is open at Clay Creative, headquarters of online bank Simple.

The Business Tribune wrote about the partnership between Portland Parks and Recreation and ZRZ Realty to deliver a health and wellness-oriented South Waterfront at the Zidell Yards.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Eastside Distilling will not be moving forward with plans for an expansion at 1805 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Legacy Emanuel, The Amy, 38 Davis and more

The proposed expansion of Legacy Emanuel hospital

The Oregonian reported that the Portland City Council, as expected, unanimously approved an inclusionary zoning programCity Observatory meanwhile noted that Denver, cited as a precedent for Portland, has backed away from inclusionary zoning. The Portland Mercury pointed out that it might take years for the program to generate any new units, due to the large number of project already in the development review pipeline.

Legacy Emanuel Medical Center announced a $210 million expansion, as reported by the Portland Business Journal. Construction is scheduled to begin next year and should take about four years.

Parking fines will rise $5 to pay for the new Multnomah County Central Courthouse, according to the Oregonian.

The Business Tribune looked at The Amy, College Housing Northwest’s proposal to make student housing more affordable.

In “where risk and resilience meet“* the DJC spoke to architect Jay Raskin, who argues that new affordable housing should be built to seismic standards that would allow units to be habitable after an earthquake, and not just to the life safety standard of the state building code.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how Ankrom Moisan Architects are settling into their new home at 38 Davis in Old Town.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Goat Blocks, 38 Davis, AC by Marriott, and more

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat Blocks development in SE Portland

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat Blocks development in SE Portland

The Business Tribune reported on Portland’s latest trend: retail alleys. Recently completed or planned projects mentioned include the Goat Blocks, the Lloyd Cinemas Redevelopment, 38 Davis and Milwaukie Way.

The Portland Business Journal had a first look at the downtown’s AC by Marriott Hotelwhich is nearing completion.

The DJC reported that the City Council voted to overturn* a condition of approval imposed on NW 14th & Raleigh by the Design Commission.

Excavation for the Broadway Tower has hit the bottom, according to the Portland Business Journal. The 19 story tower should be complete by September 2018.

Oregon Business took a look at 38 Davis, the Old Town mixed use building that now houses the new headquarters for its designers, Ankrom Moisan Architects.

The Business Tribune reported that Colas Construction has broken ground on Alberta Commons, the Natural Grocers-anchored retail development at NE MLK & Alberta.

Developers are racing to beat Portland’s Inclusionary Zoning policy, reports The Oregonian. The policy is scheduled to take effect in February, however projects that have been submitted for building permit or design review before then would be grandfathered in under the current rules.

Jazz Mecca Jimmy Mak’s will close forever, according to the Willamette Week. The bar was scheduled to move to make way for the Modera Davishowever owner Jim Makarounis’ battle with cancer has forced him to cancel the build out of a new space.

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat BlocksRussian restaurant Kachka, which will open a second location; and Seattle’s Schilling Cider, which will have “more cider taps than any cider house in the United States”.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 38 Davis, two buildings on NE Sandy, 121 SE 146th, and more

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

Portland Shoupistas asked if it is time for Portland to eliminate minimum parking requirements, following recommendations from the White House on how to reduce barriers to housing development .

The DJC wrote about how Ankrom Moisan is rethinking the architecture office*, as they get ready to move into their new home at 38 Davis in Old Town.

The Business Tribune looked at Clay Creativethe new Central Eastside offices on the site of old Taylor Electric building that are now home to online bank Simple.

As Zidell Marine gets works on its last barge, Portland Architecture discussed Portland’s transforming waterfront and wondered if the “gold-hued gantry crane” could be retained as part of future development on the Zidell YardsBikePortland looked into whether the end of barge building could accelerate the schedule for completion of the South Waterfront Greenway path. The Oregonian discovered that “Portland housing officials learned this week how much it’ll cost to buy land from the Zidell family to build affordable housing“–but won’t say yet.

KOIN reported that after 53 years Der Rheinlander restaurant at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd will close in 2017. The property has been bought by developer Venerable Properties.

Directly across the street, at 5036 NE Sandy Blvd, a 6 story apartment building is planned on the site currently occupied by Taco Time, writes the Hollywood Star News.

At Portland Monthly Randy Gragg wrote that is “growing like never before”, and asked “what should we do next?

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave by Home First Development.

A lengthy piece in the Willamette Week looked at affordable housing, and how “City officials have paid little attention to delivering the most housing for the money spent“.

With demolition underway at 1127 SW Morrison St ghost signs were revealed on an adjacent building, for the first time in 93 years. Restore Oregon tracked down newspaper ads for each of the businesses.

The Portland Business Journal showed images PSU students’ $1.3B idea for the Post Office Redevelopment .

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

While Portland has long been considered a desirable place to live, it has traditionally lagged its suburbs—Washington County particulary—in income and job growth. Following the recession this appears to have changed. Employers increasingly desire a location in central Portland. As commercial vacancy rates have dropped and rental rates gone up there has been a sudden influx of new office proposals.

The vast majority of these are speculative projects, where the developer starts work on the project without a specific tenant in mind. Only three of the buildings—the Daimler Trucks North America HQ, the Multnomah County Health Department HQ and the Seven Corners Community Collaborative—are planned for a specific end user.

Click through to see our roundup of the major projects going on right now, arranged in no specific order. Where a significant portion of the building will be used for functions other than office, the area of the office floors alone has been given. Note that the area of any building may not be directly comparable to another due to differences in methods for how floor area is calculated.

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Landmarks Commission presents State of the City Preservation Report

The Block 8L building in Skidmore Old Town, which is now under construction. The design was cited as an example of the positive contribution made by the Historic Landmarks Commission during their review.

The Block 8L building in Skidmore Old Town, which is now under construction. The design was cited as an example of the positive contribution made by the Historic Resource Review process.

The Historic Landmarks Commission has presented its 2015 State of City Preservation Report to the Portland City Council. The report gave an update to the Council on the work of the Commission, made suggestions for priorities to be addressed in the coming year and identified potential threats to historic resources in the city. Presenting the report was outgoing Chair Brian Emerick, joined by Commission member Kirk Ranzetta. A similar report was delivered earlier in the year by the Design Commission.

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Under Construction in Old Town: Block 8L (images)

An earlier version of this post was originally published in December 2014, prior to the building’s approval. The post has been updated.

Site work has begun for Block 8L, a 6 story mixed use development in the Skidmore/Old Town Historic District by Ankrom Moisan Architects and Gerding Edlen development. Located one block north of the University of Oregon’s White Stag Building, Block 8L’s ground floor will house the U of O’s new MBA Program and sports product management initiative in a 11,500 sq ft space fronting onto NW Naito Parkway. Three small retail spaces will be located at the corner of NW 1st and NW Davis. The second, third and fourth floors of Block 8L will be offices, which Ankrom Moisan intend to occupy as their new primary office. The fifth and sixth floors will have 65 residential units, 16 of which will be affordable [PDF] to those earning less than 80% of median family income, for at least 10 years. The building will include 107 long term and 10 short term bicycle parking space. No on site vehicular parking is proposed.

Aerial view looking south west

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Weekly Roundup: Pearl West, Viking Pavilion, 1510 Technology Center and more

Pearl West

Pearl West will be the new North American headquarters for Wacom

Our weekly roundup covers the stories relating to architecture & development in Portland.

Michael Graves, the architect of the Portland Building, passed away this week at the age of 80.

Wacom announced that they plan to move their North American from Vancouver, WA to the Pearl District. They will occupy three floors and 56,000 sq ft of the under construction Pearl West office building. They will also open a retail store on the ground floor.

The developers behind the James Beard Public Market briefed Multnomah County that they are looking at realigning the Morrison Bridge ramps at Naito.

Noraneko, a new ramen shop, opens today in the Pitman II restaurant building on SE Water Ave.

The state Higher Education Coordinating Commission approved the University of Oregon’s application to start a Master of Science in Sports Product Management. The program will be based in the Block 8L building in Old Town.

OHSU has committed $7.5 million to the $50 million PSU Viking Pavilion and Academic Center, which will allow the project to move ahead.

The Portland Business Journal published photos of the 1510 Technology Center, the former PGE operations facility in the Central Eastside that has been converted into new offices for Viewpoint Construction Software.

Seattle’s Urban Renaissance Group last year bought 1320 S.W. Broadway, the former home of the Oregonian. They plan a multimillion dollar renovation of the Pietro Belluschi designed building.

Weekly Roundup: Multnomah County Courthouse, Revolution Hall and more

Block 136

Block 136

  • Block 136, the Tess O’Brien Apartments and the Lloyd Center Remodel were due before the Design Commission on Thursday.
  • In a 4-1 decision, the City Council voted to reject the proposal to demolish a building at 1727 NW Hoyt.
  • In ‘Stark Changes‘ and ‘A New Old Town II‘ Places over Time wrote about the St Francis Park Apartments and Block 8L respectively.
  • The Portland Mercury reported that Revolution Hall, the music venue inside the newly renovated Washington High School, has announced its first shows.
  • Portland Architecture wrote about the design forum for the James Beard Public Market, in which the team from Snøhetta met with various groups, including University of Oregon students.
  • The Oregonian reported that Multnomah County voted to choose “an L-shaped lot at the west end of the Hawthorne Bridge” as its preferred site for a new courthouse.
  • The Portland Chronicle published photos of the demolition of a 1947 warehouse located at 1916 SE 50th. Though no construction permits have been filed yet, the blog speculates that it will become multifamily housing, given that the property is owned by Urban Development Group.