Weekly Roundup: OHSU KCRB, the Silica, PSU Karl Miller Center, and more

OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building

Construction has wrapped up on the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building.

The state of the art OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building opened last Friday, reports the Oregonian. The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how the project team came together to aid the fight against cancer*, using an integrated project delivery method. The Portland Business Journal took a first look inside the $160 million building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of The Silica, a heavy timber and glass building at 4073 N Williams Ave.

An article in Architect magazine covered how Carbon12 managed to rise over code and financing hurdles.

Metropolis magazine wrote about how the PSU Karl Miller Center quickly became the center of Portland State University’s campus.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: PSU Viking Pavilion, Fremont Place, Providence Park, and more

PSU Viking Pavilion

Construction has wrapped up on the PSU Viking Pavilion

In a 3-2 vote the City Council re-opened the door for approval of the Fremont Place Apartments, according to the Oregonian.  The Northwest Examiner asked why the issue was all about protecting views of the Fremont Bridge… until it was not?

The Business Tribune reported that the Bridgetown Lofts have been sold to Madison Park Financial Corporation for $55 million.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the affordable housing under construction at NW 14th & Raleigh in the Pearl.

Before its opening last week, the Oregonian had a sneak peak at the PSU Viking Pavilion.

The Portland City Council voted to increase building heights on Old Town Chinatown Block 33 to 160′, reports the Portland Mercury.

Work is wrapping up* on first-phase of Providence Park Expansion, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The second phase is expected in time for the opening of the spring 2019 MLS season.

Portland Monthly looked at Carbon 12the new condo tower that “is both sustainable and seismically strong.”

Portland Architecture talked with Carrie Strickland about the new era at Works Progress Architecture.

The Willamette Week reported that the Oregon ballot measure to fix housing finance prohibition has passed its first milestone.

The Oregonian reported on the Mayor’s conclusion that efforts to aid Portland’s black neighborhoods are an “abject failure”.

According to the Portland Business Journal Hilton has throw open the doors of its newest Portland luxury hotel, The Porter.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2017

Vista Pearl

The Block 20 condominium tower, now known as Vista Pearl, was the subject of our most popular post of the year

2017 is the third full year Next Portland has been in operation. Although the onset of Inclusionary Zoning has slowed down the number of new applications submitted, there was a lot to write about in 2017 while the projects submitted in late last year and early this year worked their way through the development review process.

Over the course of the year we published 176 new blog posts, and our development map now has over 1,000 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). In 2017 Next Portland had over 900,000 page views, a slight increase from the previous year.

Sixteen of the articles that made the top 25 most viewed posts were published this year; seven were published in 2016; and one was published in 2015. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list and fourth most popular article from the 2016 list—about the Goat Blocks—was still the fifteenth most popular article of 2017 despite having been written in December 2014. The 2016 roundup of the tallest buildings planned in 2016 was the third most popular article of the year, and although there wasn’t an equivalent list published in 2017 we hope to write one in early 2018.

So, with that Happy New Year to all. In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Alberta Commons, 2815 SW Babur Blvd, Oliver Station, and more

Alberta Commons

Prosper Portland is launching its Affordable Commercial Tenanting Program, with space available at the Alberta Commons

Portland State University has debuted the Karl Miller Center, the $64 million business school building at the heart of their campus, writes the Oregonian.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at Under Armour’s new Portland office at 2815 SW Babur Blvd.

Prosper Portland (formerly the Portland Development Commission) is looking for applicants for its affordable commercial space, writes the Business Tribune. Space is being offered at the Alberta Commons at NE MLK and Alberta, at Oliver Station at 9202 SE Foster Rd, at 9101 SE Foster and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Willamette Week wrote that the condominiums at Carbon12 are being offered for sale at prices up to $1.5 Million—a likely record east of the river.

The Business Tribune wrote about Security Properties’ plans for the five acre PepsiCo distribution center at at 2505 NE Pacific St.

Weekly Roundup: Providence Park, Karl Miller Center, Madison High School, and more

The proposed 4,000 seat expansion of Providence Park

The Portland Timbers released images of the Providence Park Expansion , which the Portland Mercury noted is “influenced by the iconic near-vertical stands at La Bombonera in Buenos Aires and the Shakespearean Globe Theater in London.”

The Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s 2017 State of the City Design Report.

The Oregonian wrote about how Oregon is pushing for wooden skyscrapers, including Carbon12 and Framework, to revive the state’s timber industry.

As the Portland City Council approved tax breaks for seven new buildings, in exchange for affordable housing, The Oregonian reported that Commissioner Nick Fish questioned whether the proposals go far enough. The exemptions were granted for Con-way Block 290, 2216 NW Pettygrove St, SW Park and Columbia, SW 3rd & Ash, The Atomic Orchard Lofts at 2520 NE Sandy Blvd, Old Town Chinatown Block 33, and Woody Guthrie Place at 5728 SE 91st Ave.

BikePortland reported that amid stiff opposition, the city council ordinance required for the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion was placed on hold.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how PSU is on the final stretch of work on the Karl Miller Centerthe expansion of renovation of the university’s School of Business Administration.

The Portland Tribune reported on an error by Portland Public Schools that resulted in the award of a design contract for the Madison High School Modernization to a firm that scored lower in the evaluation process.

Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Weekly Roundup: Lennox Apartments, NE Alberta & MLK, Fair Haired Dumbbell, and more

Lennox Apartments

The Lennox Apartments at SE 52nd and Holgate

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 64 apartments coming to a “long-dormant corner of Southeast Portland”. The Lennox Apartments at 4455 SE 52nd Ave will also include 3,500 sq ft of ground floor retail space, which will be outfitted for a restaurant.

With the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project (DOZA) getting underway, the DJC wrote about how “development has overloaded the system“*.

Places Over Time wrote about the dialog between two buildings that are about to go up on the same block in the Pearl: Framework and the Canopy Hotel.

Portland Architecture covered a talk given by Lever Architecture’s Thomas Robinson about Framework. The 12 story will be constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, which it make it the tallest mass timber building in the USA.

Oregon Business reported that winners of a recent Cross Laminated Timber contest included Framework and Carbon12.

According to The Oregonian, Natural Grocers won’t open at NE Alberta & MLK until February 2018—almost a full year later than expected.

The Portland Business Journal had a closer look at the next 689 apartments coming to the Lloyd District. The development at 1400 NE Multnomah recently had its first full Design Review hearing.

The New York Times wrote about the Fair Haired Dumbbella project that “keeps it funky, with design and funding“.

The Boys & Girls Club in Westmoreland has been sold, according to the Portland Business Journal. The building at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave will be replaced with a new mixed use development.

Plans are moving forward for an office and hotel development in downtown, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects at 3rd and Taylor and 3rd and Salmon respectively will bring 175,000 sq ft of office space and 20 story hotel to Downtown Portland. Demolition permits have now been filed for the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

Construction was recently completed at the Cosmopolitan on the ParkBisnow reports that the Pearl district high rise was 96% sold prior to completion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Residential Infill Project, $250 million housing bond and more

Image of a potential "north end party deck" at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Image of a potential “north end party deck” at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Veterans Memorial Coliseum was declared a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Described by Curbed in article about the designation as “one of the finest International-Style civic buildings in the west”, the fate of the building remains unclear. A report published last year identified a number of options for the building, ranging from demolition to major improvements, however the Portland City Council has yet to take any action on the report.

As work on the Residential Infill Project wraps up, the Oregonian reported that Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is readying their recommendations for changes to the Zoning Code. Developers “would be required to reduce the scale of homes they build in Portland’s single-family zones and would be allowed to construct more duplexes, triplexes and other forms of so-called ‘middle housing’.”

The Portland Chronicle reported on the ten story building at 1500 SW Taylor St, likely to replace the 1892 Holman House in Goose Hollow.

BikePortland broke that the news that Tesla Motors will build a missing section of the Willamette Greenway Trail, as part of their new showroom and repair center at 4330 SW Macadam. Initial plans submitted to the City indicated that they would not build the trail.

The Portland Development Commission will own a new mixed income building in Lents Town Center at 9101 SE Foster Rd. The public agency is taking over development from the original owner, Williams & Dame.

The City Council is getting ready to ask voters to approve a $250 million bond measure, to fund affordable housing. If approved, the measure would add $75 a year to the taxes owed on a typical single family home.

Central City Concern published a blog post about their current affordable housing developments. Miracles Central is scheduled to open in August of this year, with the Hill Park Apartments at 110 SW Arthur following in Spring of 2017.

Bloomberg wrote about D.R. Johnson, the Riddle, OR company that is the first domestic manufacturer of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT is new to the United States, but has a long history of use in Europe. Current CLT projects in Portland include Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

KGW had a sneak peak inside the nearly complete Yard tower at the Burnside Bridgehead.

The Oregonian reviewed a Portland Art Museum exhibition about Portland-based Allied Works Architecture.