Weekly Roundup: Gladys McCoy Building, Vanishing Views, Oregon Constitution, and more

The Gladys McCoy building by ZGF Architects is currently rising at NW 6th & Hoyt

One year into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing ordinance, a memo from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability recommends exploring changes to the program* in order to ensure continued housing supplies, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The City of Portland wants to change the state constitution in order to build more affordable housing for its money, according to the Willamette Week.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the under construction Gladys McCoy Building, which will serve as the new headquarters for the Multnomah County Health Department. 

KOIN reported on “Portland’s vanishing views.”

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Inclusionary Housing, FAR Transfers, Cross-Laminated Timber, and more


The Pearl District Framework development is set to break ground soon, but some environmental groups have concerns.

One year into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing program the Portland Mercury reported that the program is getting “lackluster results“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on a proposed change to the Inclusionary Housing program, that would affect condominiums*. According to Hoyt Street Properties the new regulations would cause them to “sell [their] remaining land or build office (space) instead”.

The Artists Repertory Theatre has been rescued by a $7 million anonymous donation, according to the Willamette Week. The company still however plans to sell half their block at 1515 SW Morrison St to a developer that intends to build a 218-foot residential tower on the site.

OPB wrote about a proposal by City Commissioner Fritz to amend the Central City 2035 Plan to allow Floor Area Ratio (FAR) transfers from the Open Space zone.

One year after a devastating explosion, the Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the reconstruction of the Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan St.

The Willamette Week reported that a coalition of environmental groups is criticizing the use of cross-laminated timber on the soon-to-break-ground Framework building.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: New Omni, Portland Boathouse, Overlook apartments, and more

New Omni

New Omni went in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission in December, where it was met by stiff opposition. Should the project move forward it could be the first Central City development go ahead under the city’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance.

The Willamette Week wrote about opposition to new high rises, including the Riverplace Redevelopment, Fremont Place, New Omni and original proposal for Grand Belmont—much of which is coming from residents of nearby high rises.

The Oregonian looked at areas where height could be restricted as part of the Central City 2035 plan. Portland Architecture asked if the view corridor debate is civic activism or NIMBYism?

After 43 years, regulars said farewell to the Overlook Restaurant. The diner is being replaced by the Overlook apartments at 1332 N Skidmore St.

The Portland Tribune wrote about plans for the Portland River Center, which would replace the existing boathouse and add an interpretive center with educational and meeting spaces.

The Portland Mercury wrote about how the Oregon Constitution limits opportunities to leverage the $258 million housing bond passed by voters in 2016.

Weekly Roundup: 250 Taylor, Lloyd West Anchor, Eastside Office, and more

525 SE MLK

The Eastside Office at 525 SE MLK will be framed with mass timber

The Willamette Week broke the news that Live Nation plans to open a concert venue in the Lloyd West Anchor building, formerly home to Nordstrom.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how “Portland’s anti-McMansion compromise is filling in details and nearing a final vote.”

NW Natural will move from Old Town into the 250 Taylor office building in 2019, reports the Portland Tribune.

The Portland City Council approved a resolution outlining priorities for how the $258 million housing bond should be spent, according to the Oregonian.

According to the Portland Tribune the city council will this week review a map showing any potential conflicts held by members of the West Quadrant Plan Stakeholders Advisory Committee. The plan, adopted by council in 2015, informs the larger Central City 2035 Plan currently before council.

The Business Tribune wrote about two cross-laminated timber buildings being designed by Hacker, including the Eastside Office at 525 SE MLK.

As the Portland area sets itself up as a center for mass timber construction, the Business Tribune asked what is it, and where can we see it?

As Adidas gets ready for a major expansion in Portland, the Oregonian sat down with executive Mark King to discuss the sportswear company’s future plans.

Weekly Roundup: Albina Vision, 2505 NE Pacific, Tanner Creek Tavern, and more

An aerial view of the Albina Vision (labels by Bike Portland)

BikePortland took a look at the Albina Vision, a concept plan to restore the historic Rose Quarter neighborhood and put biking and walking first.

As the City Council held its first hearing on the Central City 2035 Plan, the Oregonian looked at 9 key changes proposed.

Seattle based Security Properties has closed on the 4.7-acre PepsiCo site at 2505 NE Pacific St, writes the DJC.  The developer is “is in the process of interviewing architects to begin conceptual design for the multiphase redevelopment”. With news of the development breaking, theOregonian asked if Sandy Boulevard is the next Hawthorne?

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at chef David Machado’s Tanner Creek Tavern, which opened this week in the Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites.

Core and shell work has wrapped up at the Towne Storage Building. The DJC published photos of the  renovated building, before construction begins on the tenant improvement for software company Autodesk.

Lastly, a note on the frequency of posts here at Next Portland. As some people have noticed the number of posts published has gone down a lot in the last couple months. This isn’t a reflection of there being less to write about; it’s just that Next Portland is written by just one person, in my spare time, and I haven’t had the ability to commit time to the site in recent months. As things are getting back to normal I hope to be able to return to the regular posting frequency. There are many large projects that I haven’t yet had a chance to write about, but which I think Next Portland readers will enjoy learning about.

Weekly Roundup: Walnut Park, Terminal One, Central City 2035, and more

Walnut Park

Conceptual image for a redevelopment of the Walnut Park site, by Merryman Barnes Architects

The DJC reported that Multnomah County is eyeing the Walnut Park site at 5329 N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd for redevelopment.* A preferred alternative calls for “94 market-rate apartments, 50 affordable apartments for seniors, 14 townhomes, a food hall, county services and a single floor of underground parking”.

The Willamette Week wrote about the latest fight over a changing Portland: the fate of Peterson’s on Morrison, which is likely to be displaced by the refurbishment of the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The city has finalized the sale of Terminal One to Lithia Motors, according to the Oregonian.

The Central City is prepping for major growth, writes the Portland Tribune. The first City Council hearing on the Central City 2035 plan will happen this Thursday.

The DJC published photos of the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building as ironworkers top out the South Waterfront project. Completion is scheduled for July 2018.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Atomic Orchard, Residential Infill, Eagles Lodge, and more

A potential future for the “Innovation Quadrant”, as envisioned in the Central City 2035 Plan

The DJC wrote about Guerrilla Development’s “weird concept” for the Atomic Orchard Experiment at 2510 NE Sandy Blvd. The apartment building will include a mix of market rate and affordable housing, with some of the affordable units renting for less than $600 per month – without government subsidies.*

With Portland’s parking minimums for multifamily housing effectively repealed, Portland Shoupistas asked “what’s next?

The Oregonian reported that the Portland City Council voted to approve the Residential Infill Project, which aims to reduce demolitions of single family houses while increasing the number of duplexes and triplexes built.

Portland Architecture discussed the Central City 2035 plan with three planners from the Bureau of Planning & Sustainability.

OPB looked at the toxic legacy of the Zidell Yards—and the efforts to clean the site up.

The Business Tribune wrote about plans to redevelop Chinatown’s Wong Laundry building at 227 NW 3rd Ave, which will have to clear the high bar of City Council approval for the demolition of a contributing building in a historic district.

The Portland Mercury reported that the Eagles Lodge at 4904 SE Hawthorne Blvd may soon be sold, with redevelopment of the site likely.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Post Office Redevelopment, 419 SW Washington, NE 106th & Halsey and more

Broadway Corridor USPS

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A 30-story tower by ZGF Architects is planned at 419 SW Washington St, according to The Oregonian. The existing building on the site was recently being used as a temporary homeless shelter, and is now vacant.

The first public hearing of the proposed draft of the Central City 2035 Plan was dominated by concerns about building heights in West End and Goose Hollow, according to an article in the DJC*. Meanwhile, Portland Shoupistas argued that proposed changes related to parking in the plan represent a step backwards.

The Oregonian wrote that up to 1,200 more apartments are proposed on the Prometheus Property in South Waterfront.

Kimberly Branam has been picked as the next executive director of the Portland Development Commission, according to The Oregonian. For the past five years Branam has been second-in-command to former executive director Patrick Quinton.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 54 organizations that are backing the proposed $258M affordable housing bond.

OPB’s “State of Wonder” discussed Yard, the recently completed Burnside Bridgehead tower that has sharply divided the opinions of Portlanders.

The Oregonian discovered the premium that will be paid by the PDC for a piece of land near the airport, necessary to allow the Post Office Redevelopment to move forward.

After 92 years, the Lotus Cardroom & Cafe will close later this month, according to KATU. The bar will be demolished to make way for the 3rd & Salmon hotel tower.

An affordable housing development at NE 106th & Halsey by Gerding Edlen and Human Solutions has nearby residents worried, according to the Mid-County Memo.

The timeframe for the City and ZRZ Realty to agree on the price of a piece of land at the Zidell Yards has been missed, according to The Oregonian.  Under a development agreement signed last year, the City has the option to buy the property at an agreed price, for the purpose of building affordable housing.

The Willamette Week wrote about 5 MLKthe Burnside Bridgehead high-rise that will replace the 95 year old Fishels Furniture building.

Work has begun on the Union at St Johns, according to the Portland Business Journal. The mixed use building will include 100 apartments as well as 20,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Riverplace affordable housing, SE Quadrant Plan and more

Riverplace Parcel 3

Riverplace Parcel 3

The Oregonian reported that the Portland Development Commission has picked a development team that includes Williams & Dame and BRIDGE Housing for Riverplace Parcel 3. The $93 million project will include 203 units of affordable housing, 162 units of market rate housing and 30,000 sq ft of retail.

In a 4-0 vote, the City Council approved the SE Quadrant Plan, a part of the Central City 2035 plan. The document will guide development in the Central Eastside for the next 20 years.

As the PDC gets ready to begin selective demolition at Centennial Mills, the Mayor’s office has asked the PDC to look whether the entire complex should be demolished. The current plan is to save the feed mill, the flour mill and the mounted patrol unit, but there is currently insufficient funds to bring them back into use.

Community Visions, a non profit that helps people with disabilities live independently in their homes, is moving forward with plans for the Seven Corners Community CollaborativeAn article in The Oregonian described their ambitions for the building.

Mexican restaurant Rocio’s has opened in the Creston Lofts. Eater PDX published photos of the new space.

The Oregonian reported that the owners of City Liquidators are working on plans for a privately owned park with associated mixed use development at 711 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. The new open space, tentatively named Pelett Park, could include food carts and patio seating for Le Bistro Montage.

Weekly Roundup: Hotel Cornelius, The Redd, Ankeny Lofts and more


Hotel Cornelius Lobby (image via Portland Preservation). The interior no longer remains.

  • The Portland City Council held a public hearing on the proposed West Quadrant Plan, a component of the Central City 2035 Plan. The Oregonian had “10 takeaways from the 20-year plan for the westside.”
  • The Portland Design Commission this week reviewed Hazelwood Plaza and offered Design Advice on Modera Belmont.
  • Portland Monthly wrote about The Redd on Salmon St, an empty warehouse in the Central Eastside which the Ecotrust intends to convert into an “incubator for artisan food businesses.”
  • The Oregon confirmed that the adjacent Woodlark Building and Hotel Cornelius will be converted into a hotel operated by Provenance Hotels. A Pre-Application Conference for the project was held in December.
  • The Zipper, Guerrilla Development’s latest project, is taking shape on NE Sandy. The collection of micro-restaurants will open in March.
  • Major construction on the Lloyd Center Remodel begins in March. A story in the Oregonian said that brokers are shying away from traditional tenants, and are looking instead at “boutiques, restaurants, brewpubs, exercise studios and possibly a grocery store or a farmers market.”
  • Portland Architecture published photos of Colab’s recently completed Ankeny Lofts 2/3.
  • The 657-unit, three-building Hassalo on Eighth project will have a topping off ceremony on Monday, with Mayor Charlie Hales and Congressmen Earl Blumenauer present.
  • The Portland Chronicle published construction photos of Urban Development Group’s 27th & Ankeny project.
  • Randy Gragg asked whether the PNCA 511 Building will spark a renaissance in Old Town. The first students moved into the building this week.
  • The Portland Business Journal had a look at the under construction Erickson Saloon & Fritz Hotel project.
  • New Seasons has pre-leased 15,000 sq ft retail space in the Cook Street Apartments, to address a parking shortage at their North Williams store.
  • Hacienda CDC has a number of community projects in progress on the east side, including the Portland Mercado.