Weekly Roundup: Fair Haired Dumbell, AIA Portland Awards, PSU School of Business Administration, and more

Fair Haired Dumbell

The Fair-Haired Dumbell will have a facade painted with a mural by Los Angeles-based artist James Jean

The DJC wrote about the ‘elaborate’ Building Information Modelling (BIM) process* being used to help deliver the PSU School of Business Administration.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the paint scheme has been chosen Fair-Haired Dumbbell building, and “it’s unlike anything else in town“.  They also revealed that co-working company TENpod will occupy 8,000 sq ft in the building.

The Oregonian reported that the Sears building in the Lloyd Center has been sold, and the retailer’s presence in the mall “will either shrink significantly or disappear altogether“.  On Thursday morning, the ice rink at the center of the mall reopened, after a major renovation.

Eater PDX reported that Tom’s First Avenue Bento will close after nearly 25 years, to make way for the Multnomah County Central Courthouse.

The 12-unit Jarrett Street Condos are receiving very little interest from those eligible to receive the city subsidized down-payment assistance, according to The Oregonian.

Portland Architecture wrote about the winning projects at the AIA Portland Architecture Awards. Buildings honored include Slate, 1638 NW Overton St, Framework (CEID), Albina Yard, Karuna at One North, The Cosmopolitan on the Park and Park Avenue West.

Preservation group Restore Oregon announced their top restoration projects of 2016, including the Pine Street Market and the Society Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal showcased the “stellar views and cool workspaces” at Slate.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 9101 Foster, 1725 SE Tenino, Hotel Chamberlain, and more

9101 SE Foster

9101 Foster by Hacker

A gas explosion in NW Portland destroyed the 110 year old Wilfred & Gustav Burkhardt Building, and caused significant damage to nearby buildings including Allied Works’ Ann Sacks Residence at 2281 NW Glisan St. The explosion happened after an underground gas pipeline was struck by a subcontractor performing pre-construction work at the site of the future Restoration Hardware.

The DJC wrote about the partnership* between Beam Development and Urban Development + Partners, who first collaborated on the Central Eastside building SlateFuture projects include the adaptive reuse of the Hotel Chamberlain at 509 SE Grand Ave, a 13-story mixed-use development at 550 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, and a mid-rise creative office building at 525 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

Construction finished over the summer at Milwaukie Way, the Westmoreland retail development that wraps around Relish gastropub. The Portland Business Journal took a look at how it turned out.

Eater reported that Catalan restaurant Can Font will open a second location, in the ground floor of the Cosmopolitan on the Park.

The Oregonian reported that modern Mexican restaurant Alto Bajo will open early next year in the Hi Lo Hotel.

The Portland Mercury reported that Sellwood burger restaurant Mike’s Drive-In is likely to be replaced by new apartments. Developer UDG recently requested Early Assistance for a 78 unit residential building at 1725 SE Tenino St.

Portland Architecture discussed the design of Portland Art Museum’s proposed Rothko Pavilion with museum director Brian Ferriso.

The Portland Business Journal reported that a groundbreaking ceremony for 9101 Foster was planned for Sunday. The PDC developed building in Lents Town Center will include 54 apartments–16 of which will be affordable housing–and 9,000 sq ft of retail space.

Kevin Howard of Northwest Self Storage wrote in the Portland Business Journal about the boom and the impending bust of self-storage facilities in Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Press Blocks, The Woodlark, Hyatt House, and more

Press Blocks

Concept for the full block building at the Press Blocks, by Mithun

The Business Tribune wrote about the Press Blocks, the redevelopment of the former Oregonian Publishing Buildings in Goose Hollow. The project would include two buildings. One building would occupy a full city block and another a half block, and are being designed by Mithun and GBD Architects respectively.

The DJC published photos of the under construction Rivage Apartmentsformerly known as Riverscape Lot 8.

The Oregonian wrote about a Chinese group protesting the decision to hang banners in Chinatown with the name “New Chinatown/Japan Town”.  Though listed on the National Register of Historic Places under that name, it is otherwise rarely used.

The Oregonian reported that “outrage surges” as the deadline to put the $750 million Portland Public Schools bond on the November ballot has passed. If passed on the May ballot, which is much likely, the measure would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School. Students at Lincoln High left class to protest the decision not to place the measure on the November ballot.

Portland Architecture interviewed Bora’s Brad Demby about the Cosmopolitan on the Park, the now complete high rise at the north end of the Pearl District.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at The Woodlarkthe new Downtown hotel that will open in 2017. The hotel will combine two buildings: the Woodlark Building, most recently used as an office; the Hotel Cornelius, which has long been vacant.

The Hyatt House at Riverplace is now open, reports the Portland Business Journal. The hotel includes 203 extended-stay rooms.

Weekly Roundup: Lennox Apartments, NE Alberta & MLK, Fair Haired Dumbbell, and more

Lennox Apartments

The Lennox Apartments at SE 52nd and Holgate

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 64 apartments coming to a “long-dormant corner of Southeast Portland”. The Lennox Apartments at 4455 SE 52nd Ave will also include 3,500 sq ft of ground floor retail space, which will be outfitted for a restaurant.

With the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project (DOZA) getting underway, the DJC wrote about how “development has overloaded the system“*.

Places Over Time wrote about the dialog between two buildings that are about to go up on the same block in the Pearl: Framework and the Canopy Hotel.

Portland Architecture covered a talk given by Lever Architecture’s Thomas Robinson about Framework. The 12 story will be constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, which it make it the tallest mass timber building in the USA.

Oregon Business reported that winners of a recent Cross Laminated Timber contest included Framework and Carbon12.

According to The Oregonian, Natural Grocers won’t open at NE Alberta & MLK until February 2018—almost a full year later than expected.

The Portland Business Journal had a closer look at the next 689 apartments coming to the Lloyd District. The development at 1400 NE Multnomah recently had its first full Design Review hearing.

The New York Times wrote about the Fair Haired Dumbbella project that “keeps it funky, with design and funding“.

The Boys & Girls Club in Westmoreland has been sold, according to the Portland Business Journal. The building at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave will be replaced with a new mixed use development.

Plans are moving forward for an office and hotel development in downtown, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects at 3rd and Taylor and 3rd and Salmon respectively will bring 175,000 sq ft of office space and 20 story hotel to Downtown Portland. Demolition permits have now been filed for the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

Construction was recently completed at the Cosmopolitan on the ParkBisnow reports that the Pearl district high rise was 96% sold prior to completion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability).

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan, showing a possible development scenario approximating future growth in the Pearl District over 20 years (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability). At least two of the sites shown as potentially developable have current proposals on them.

It is just over a year since Next Portland last did a roundup of the tallest buildings planned or under construction in Portland. At that time, we counted 25 buildings over 100′ in height planned. Today we count 40. Given the length of time it takes to complete a high rise building, many of the buildings on the 2016 were also on the 2015 list. Four buildings are no longer on the list this year, due to having been completed: Block 17, Pearl West, the Aster Tower and Park Avenue West. Seven buildings that were still in the design phase last year are now under construction. No building on last year’s list is known to have been cancelled.

Read on to see our complete list. Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. In some cases the heights have been estimated.

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Weekly Roundup: PSU Smith Student Union, A La Carts, Rheinlander restaurant and more

PSU Smith Student Union

Concept for a renovated PSU Smith Student Union. Should the project move ahead architects will oarde selected to develop a final design.

Portland Architecture wrote an extended summary of the Restore Oregon hosted mayoral debate, where candidates discussed housing, density and preservation.

In article titled “Gatekeepers of Portland character” KGW wrote about the Portland Design Commission, who are responsible for reviewing all major developments in the Central City.

The Oregonian reported on the approval of 4th and Harrison, which neighbors believe is in error. The approved building has a floor area ratio (FAR) of almost 9:1, achieved through a combination of the 6:1 base FAR for the site and 3:1 in bonuses. While the applicants and City staff believe that the site is eligible for bonuses, neighborhoods contend that it isn’t, and that any building on the site should have an FAR of no more than 6:1.

A bill that would allow local governments to implement Inclusionary Zoning has passed the Oregon Senate, reported The Oregonian. The bill will now heads to the House, where it is likely to pass.

The Hollywood Star News asked if the Rheinlander building on NE Sandy is to bite der dust? An Early Assistance application was recently received by the City for the site at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd, indicating that the restaurant site could be redeveloped into a mixed use building of 2 to 4 stories.

The Multnomah County Health Department Headquarters will be named after Gladys McCoy. According to the Willamette Week McCoy was “the first black member of the Portland school board, the first black member of the Multnomah County Board and the first black chair of that board.”

The Willamette Week reported that the A La Carts food cart pod has closed. The site at 4926 SE Division St is set to be redeveloped by Urban Development Group, who are planning a mixed use building with a branch of the Green Zebra grocery chain at the ground floor.

A transcript of a recent American Assets Trust earning call indicated that the company is “currently evaluating various alternatives” for how to move ahead with Oregon SquareLeases at the existing office buildings on the site are being allowed to expire in order to allow the site to be redeveloped. Stating that they do not wish to “act in haste, repent at leisure”, CEO and Chairman of the AAT Board of Directors Ernest Rady stated that they are “looking at every opportunity, including some office, including some apartments, including phasing it and we are now working on examining each of those alternatives. It is a real opportunity and we want to make sure we make the most of it.” A decision on how to move forward is expected by September.

Portland State University students will this April vote in a referendum over whether to increase student fees in order to finance a major renovation of the Smith Memorial Student Union, writes the PSU Vanguard. Two possible solutions include a $65 million renovation and a $90 million renovation.

Kaiser Permanente will open a clinic in the Pearl District, in one of the retail spaces in the Cosmopolitan on the Park tower. Kaiser told that the Portland Business Journal that the clinic will offer “convenient access for routine everyday care and minor health issues.”

The Portland Chronicle published photos of Otak Architects’ under construction Cook Street Lofts on N Vancouver Avenue. The site noted that this project and adjacent project The Woods will “bring 154 units to the block previously home to three single-family dwellings”.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of the Year

The Goat Blocks

LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, the subject of our second most viewed post of 2015

2015 is the first full calendar year Next Portland has been in operation, and it’s been a year of huge growth for the site. As the year draws to a close it seemed like a good time to look at what the most popular posts of the year were. If there’s an overall trend evident it’s that posts about tall or large buildings do well. The single most popular post was the round up of the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction. Posts about high rise buildings under construction—including Block 136, The Cosmopolitan, The NV (formerly The Overton), and Yard (formerly Block 67)—feature prominently in the list. The giant development at Oregon Square makes the list three times, and the redevelopment of the USPS site in the Pearl is included three times. The most popular post about a single project covered LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, a superblock development currently under construction in inner Buckman.

Other posts to make the top 25 were more surprising. The list includes the Worldmark by Wyndham and The Society Hotel, both relatively small hotel projects in Old Town. The initial post about 3rd & Taylor likely performed so well not because of the scale of the project, but because Next Portland was the first place to write about the potential demolition of the Hotel Albion. At only 8 stories Carbon12 wouldn’t come close to making the list of the tallest buildings planned for Portland, but is notable for the fact that the high rise structure will be built out of wood.

Were there any posts you particularly enjoyed reading this year? Let us know in the comments. Here is the full list of our most popular posts of 2015:

1 – Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

2 – LOCA @ The Goat Blocks

3 – Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67

4 – Focus: 20 New Hotels Proposed For Portland

5 – Worldmark by Wyndham set to receive Design Advice

6 – Carbon12, an 8 story wood building, proposed for N Williams

7 – Concepts released for redevelopment of USPS site

8 – Pre-Application Conference scheduled for SW 3rd & Taylor

9 – Under Construction in Old Town: The Society Hotel

10 – Cook Street Apartments

11 – Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment returns in front of Design Commission (images)

12 – The Fair Haired Dumbbell

13 – Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75

14 – PDC identifies preferred concept for Post Office site

15 – Block 136 heading to Design Review

16 – Under Construction in South Waterfront: Block 37

17 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton

18 – Design Commission approves Oregon Square

19 –Design Commission reviews Oregon Square

20 – Oregon Square update

21 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park

22 – Design Commission approves The Porter hotel

23 – 4th & Harrison returning for Design Advice

24 – Grand Belmont returns before Historic Landmarks Commission

25 – Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

 

Going tall: new projects complete the north Pearl District

July 11, 2013 LU 13-139762 DZM AD - Applicant Presentation - 05

There are few neighborhoods in Portland that have seen more changes in recent decades than the Pearl District.

Today the Pearl has evolved from what The Oregonian described in 1994 as “a decaying portion of Northwest Portland once devoted to industry and transportation” into a mixed-use neighborhood with thousands of residents, large offices and numerous shops and restaurants. Despite the huge changes, architects and developers working in the early phases of large development in the neighborhood were often responding to the historic context of one of Portland’s older neighborhoods: Couch’s Addition was platted in 1842; the North Park Blocks were acquired by the City in 1869; and many of the warehouses in the NW 13th Ave Historic District date back to the early 20th Century. Developments such as the Brewery Blocks or the Ecotrust incorporated historic buildings, while new condominiums mimicked their aesthetic. While little of the industry that once defined the area is left today, one of the charms of the neighborhood is the juxtaposition of high rises such as the Casey and historic low rises such as the Bullseye Glass Building.

Further north in the Pearl there was less context to respond to. Much of the developable land was former railway yards, and the warehouses along NW 13th Avenue were more often single-story concrete structures rather than charming brick buildings. As development started to cross Lovejoy—once an elevated ramp leading to the Broadway Bridge—planners and neighborhood activists started to wonder if the North Pearl might develop in a different way. Instead of the bulky full block developments that had been built on some blocks south of Lovejoy, it was proposed that the developers might be allowed to build taller, but narrower.

In 2008 the Zoning Code was amended to incorporate a provision that exists nowhere else in the City: in the North Pearl Height Opportunity Area there are no maximum building heights for buildings with narrow floor plates.

…continue reading our guest post at Portland Architecture.

Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

It’s now almost 6 months since the first post on Next Portland. Since then we’ve published over 180 posts and added over 350 projects to our map, which is a testament to the staggering scale of development happening right now in Portland. Much of this development is 4-6 story buildings along the corridors such as N Williams and SE Division, but there is also a large number of tall buildings going up in the Central City, which why we decided to list the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction.

While the boom of the 2000s was defined by the activity in South Waterfront, today that district has no apartments or condos planned over 6 stories tall. By contrast the Pearl, the Lloyd District and the Central Eastside are all seeing their skylines altered. Activity in Downtown has quieter, but it also has the tallest building in our list, which is now the 4th tallest building in the city.

Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. Where indicated the heights have been estimated.

1 – Park Avenue West

Height: 460′
Architect: TVA Architects
Status: Under Construction

November 21, 2013 LU 13-214772 DZ - Drawings - 03

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North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park (images)

This post is the first in a series on the high-rises currently under construction in the North Pearl. See also Part II about the Overton and Part III about Block 17.

The Cosmopolitan on the Park is currently rising on a previously vacant parcel owned by Hoyt St Properties, between NW Northrup St & Overton St and NW 10th Ave & 11th Ave. At 340′ tall, the 28 story building will be the tallest building in the Pearl, and the 8th tallest building in Portland. Previously known as Block 15, the project by Boora Architects includes 168 condominium units and 6,866 square feet of ground floor retail space. 5 of the residential units are intended as live/work units, with entries directly onto NW Overton St. 197 car parking spaces and 254 bicycle spaces are provided in a 4-story above grade podium.

July 11, 2013  LU 13-139762 DZM AD - Applicant Presentation - 01

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