Weekly Roundup: Parking Minimums, Post Office, ITAP, and more

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A little more than 3 years after the Portland City Council added minimum parking requirements for new apartment buildings, it has voted to remove them, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Post Office site in the Pearl has formally been handed over to the Portland Development Commission, writes the Business Tribune. Development on the site could begin in two years.

According to a report seen by the Oregonian, major problems with the Bureau of Development Services’ paperless permitting system ITAP were “enabled by ‘significant gaps’ in leadership.”

Walker Macy has presented the interim findings for the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Report, writes the Business Tribune.

The buyer of the Macy’s space at the Meier & Frank Building has confirmed their plans to the Portland Business Journal:  ground floor retail with creative office space above.

The DJC published photos of the completed Burnside Bridgehead building Slate.

Construction Dive wrote about The Amy, the 141 unit student-oriented affordable housing now under construction in SW Portland.

Give your opinion on Design Review

Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project

Map of where the Design Overlay Zone is currently applied, and where it is proposed to expand. Click to enlarge.

Last month Next Portland shared information about the Design Overlay Zone Assessment (DOZA) project, a study that intends to look at what works and doesn’t work with Portland’s current Design Review system, and how the city can improve its process and tools to create a better process. The post mentioned that the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability would be soon be publishing a questionnaire, offering a direct way to provide feedback. That questionnaire is now online.  The DOZA team are looking for feedback from stakeholders, including “neighborhood residents, architects, developers, affordable housing advocates and other interested groups”.  The questionnaire will be available until September 9th, 2016, at 5 p.m.

Weekly Roundup: Lennox Apartments, NE Alberta & MLK, Fair Haired Dumbbell, and more

Lennox Apartments

The Lennox Apartments at SE 52nd and Holgate

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 64 apartments coming to a “long-dormant corner of Southeast Portland”. The Lennox Apartments at 4455 SE 52nd Ave will also include 3,500 sq ft of ground floor retail space, which will be outfitted for a restaurant.

With the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project (DOZA) getting underway, the DJC wrote about how “development has overloaded the system“*.

Places Over Time wrote about the dialog between two buildings that are about to go up on the same block in the Pearl: Framework and the Canopy Hotel.

Portland Architecture covered a talk given by Lever Architecture’s Thomas Robinson about Framework. The 12 story will be constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, which it make it the tallest mass timber building in the USA.

Oregon Business reported that winners of a recent Cross Laminated Timber contest included Framework and Carbon12.

According to The Oregonian, Natural Grocers won’t open at NE Alberta & MLK until February 2018—almost a full year later than expected.

The Portland Business Journal had a closer look at the next 689 apartments coming to the Lloyd District. The development at 1400 NE Multnomah recently had its first full Design Review hearing.

The New York Times wrote about the Fair Haired Dumbbella project that “keeps it funky, with design and funding“.

The Boys & Girls Club in Westmoreland has been sold, according to the Portland Business Journal. The building at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave will be replaced with a new mixed use development.

Plans are moving forward for an office and hotel development in downtown, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects at 3rd and Taylor and 3rd and Salmon respectively will bring 175,000 sq ft of office space and 20 story hotel to Downtown Portland. Demolition permits have now been filed for the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

Construction was recently completed at the Cosmopolitan on the ParkBisnow reports that the Pearl district high rise was 96% sold prior to completion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Portland wants your opinion on Design Review

Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project

Map of where the Design Overlay Zone is currently applied, and where it is proposed to expand. Click to enlarge.

Next Portland is one of a number of media outlets that the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) has invited to join a roundtable discussion about Portland’s Design Review process. The discussion is part of the Design Overlay Zone Assessment (DOZA) Project, which intends to “document and assess how the tools that carry out the (d) overlay affect the outcomes for discretionary and nondiscretionary reviews.”

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Weekly Roundup: Residential Infill Project, Design Overlay Zone Assessment, Affordable Housing Bond and more

Residential Infill Project

The Residential Infill Project has released recommendations for changes to the zoning in Portland’s single family residential zones. One of the proposed changes is reduced the allowable height of flat roofs from 30′ to 25′.

The Portland Business Journal wrote that jazz club Jimmy Mak’s has found a new home, with an exterior courtyard. The Pearl District bar is relocating to make way for the Modera Davis apartment building.

The Business Tribune reported that work is beginning on the Design Overlay Zone Assessment project. As Portland gets ready to expand the number of areas covered by Design Review it has asked consultants to perform an independent, comprehensive assessment of the city’s design overlay zone.

Work is about to begin on the Broadway Tower, according to the Portland Business Journal. The 19 story tower will include a Radisson Red hotel and 175,000 sq ft of office space.

The Portland Business Journal had a look inside Stoel Rives’ “lofty new digs” at Park Avenue West.

KGW reported that demands for Portland’s core housing leaves suburbs slow to grow.

Details of the $258.4 million affordable housing bond that will be on the November ballot were published in the Portland Mercury.

Portland is seeking feedback on the Residential Infill Project, and is holding a series of open houses. An online open house will accept comments until August 15th 2015. A letter to the editor the Portland Chronicle was critical of the project, and argued that the City is “failing its promise to the majority of its citizens”.