Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016

5 MLK

The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Weekly Roundup: Goat Blocks, 38 Davis, AC by Marriott, and more

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat Blocks development in SE Portland

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat Blocks development in SE Portland

The Business Tribune reported on Portland’s latest trend: retail alleys. Recently completed or planned projects mentioned include the Goat Blocks, the Lloyd Cinemas Redevelopment, 38 Davis and Milwaukie Way.

The Portland Business Journal had a first look at the downtown’s AC by Marriott Hotelwhich is nearing completion.

The DJC reported that the City Council voted to overturn* a condition of approval imposed on NW 14th & Raleigh by the Design Commission.

Excavation for the Broadway Tower has hit the bottom, according to the Portland Business Journal. The 19 story tower should be complete by September 2018.

Oregon Business took a look at 38 Davis, the Old Town mixed use building that now houses the new headquarters for its designers, Ankrom Moisan Architects.

The Business Tribune reported that Colas Construction has broken ground on Alberta Commons, the Natural Grocers-anchored retail development at NE MLK & Alberta.

Developers are racing to beat Portland’s Inclusionary Zoning policy, reports The Oregonian. The policy is scheduled to take effect in February, however projects that have been submitted for building permit or design review before then would be grandfathered in under the current rules.

Jazz Mecca Jimmy Mak’s will close forever, according to the Willamette Week. The bar was scheduled to move to make way for the Modera Davishowever owner Jim Makarounis’ battle with cancer has forced him to cancel the build out of a new space.

Two new retail tenants have been confirmed for the Goat BlocksRussian restaurant Kachka, which will open a second location; and Seattle’s Schilling Cider, which will have “more cider taps than any cider house in the United States”.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: the NV, Zidell Yards, Goat Blocks and more

The NV

The NV apartments in the North Pearl by ZGF Architects

The Business Tribune wrote about The NVone of the growing number of residential towers in the North Pearl.

Eater PDX reported that pizzeria Please Louise will be going into the ground floor of the LL Hawkins building in Slabtown.

Urban Land Magazine analyzed how the mix of uses at the Goat Blocks made the development possible.

The Oregonian broke the news that up to 67 windows will be added to the nearly complete Yard tower at the east end of the Burnside Bridge. The cost of the revisions will mostly be covered by the City of Portland, through fee refunds.

ZRZ Realty has hired Thomas Henneberry, “a longtime real estate consultant from the D.C. area” to oversee development of the Zidell Yards, according to the Portland Business Journal. The firm last year received design advice for Zidell Blocks 4 & 6though do not intend to break ground on the buildings until tenants are secured.

BikePortland had a look at the 600 space Lloyd Cycle Station, developed as part of the Hassalo on Eighth project.

The Oregonian reported on developer Gerding Edlen’s plans for a 17 story tower at 5 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. The building would replace the building that has housed Fishels Furniture for decades.

The Business Tribune checked in on the construction progress at the Japanese Garden ExpansionThe new cultural village by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma is expected to be completed in April 2017.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works founder Brad Cloepfil, in advance of a retrospective exhibition about the firm’s work at Portland Art Museum.

The Business Tribune looked at the ongoing restoration of the former Oregonian publishing building at 1320 BroadwayThe renovation is set for completion on June 30th.

New restaurant Q, the successor to Veritable Quandary, will be located in the 2&Taylor building, according to the Portland Business Journal. The former Yamhill Marketplace and Bally’s Total Fitness underwent a major renovation in 2014, and is now home to Jama Software.

The Willamette Week asked whether it is appropriate for the new 2035 Comprehensive Plan to downzone areas of East Portland in the middle of a housing crisis.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting Chinese food pop-up is likely going into the under construction Central Eastside 811 Stark building.

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of the Year

The Goat Blocks

LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, the subject of our second most viewed post of 2015

2015 is the first full calendar year Next Portland has been in operation, and it’s been a year of huge growth for the site. As the year draws to a close it seemed like a good time to look at what the most popular posts of the year were. If there’s an overall trend evident it’s that posts about tall or large buildings do well. The single most popular post was the round up of the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction. Posts about high rise buildings under construction—including Block 136, The Cosmopolitan, The NV (formerly The Overton), and Yard (formerly Block 67)—feature prominently in the list. The giant development at Oregon Square makes the list three times, and the redevelopment of the USPS site in the Pearl is included three times. The most popular post about a single project covered LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, a superblock development currently under construction in inner Buckman.

Other posts to make the top 25 were more surprising. The list includes the Worldmark by Wyndham and The Society Hotel, both relatively small hotel projects in Old Town. The initial post about 3rd & Taylor likely performed so well not because of the scale of the project, but because Next Portland was the first place to write about the potential demolition of the Hotel Albion. At only 8 stories Carbon12 wouldn’t come close to making the list of the tallest buildings planned for Portland, but is notable for the fact that the high rise structure will be built out of wood.

Were there any posts you particularly enjoyed reading this year? Let us know in the comments. Here is the full list of our most popular posts of 2015:

1 – Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

2 – LOCA @ The Goat Blocks

3 – Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67

4 – Focus: 20 New Hotels Proposed For Portland

5 – Worldmark by Wyndham set to receive Design Advice

6 – Carbon12, an 8 story wood building, proposed for N Williams

7 – Concepts released for redevelopment of USPS site

8 – Pre-Application Conference scheduled for SW 3rd & Taylor

9 – Under Construction in Old Town: The Society Hotel

10 – Cook Street Apartments

11 – Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment returns in front of Design Commission (images)

12 – The Fair Haired Dumbbell

13 – Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75

14 – PDC identifies preferred concept for Post Office site

15 – Block 136 heading to Design Review

16 – Under Construction in South Waterfront: Block 37

17 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton

18 – Design Commission approves Oregon Square

19 –Design Commission reviews Oregon Square

20 – Oregon Square update

21 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park

22 – Design Commission approves The Porter hotel

23 – 4th & Harrison returning for Design Advice

24 – Grand Belmont returns before Historic Landmarks Commission

25 – Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

 

The changing face of Portland’s Central Eastside

240 Clay

In 1922 Euclid, Ohio adopted a zoning ordinance that included six classes of use, intended to preserve to the village character of the Cleveland suburb. Industry would be kept away from residential uses, and building heights would be limited. While Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City and Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse are probably more famous examples of city planning based on separation of uses, Euclid’s zoning ordinance ultimately became the more influential. A large landowner sued the municipality, arguing that in limiting the development potential of their site Euclid had unconstitutionally deprived them of their ability to develop their site with an industrial use.

The case made it all the Supreme Court. In the 1926 case Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. the court sided with the village, establishing the broad precedent that single-use zoning was permissible. While there are other types of zoning used in the US, the model used by Euclid is by far the most common, and is often referred to by planners as Euclidean zoning.

Around the same time, Portland was writing its first zoning code, firmly based on the emerging Euclidean tradition. The 1924 code didn’t regulate many of the things we now expect to find in a zoning code, such as heights, setbacks or density. It did separate the city into four zones, based on use: Class I-Single Family; Class II-Multi-family; Class III-Business-manufacturing; and Class IV-Unrestricted. Many of the decisions made almost a century ago are still evident in the way Portland is developing today. The 1924 code applied the Business-manufacturing zone to the streetcar lines and arterial roads, while limiting the areas in between them to single or multifamily development. The Class I-Single Family zone was generally applied to the most prestigious neighborhoods, such as Eastmoreland, Laurelhurst, Irvington and Alameda. Plus ça change…

…continue reading our guest post at Portland Architecture.

Weekly Roundup: Goat Blocks, Station Place Lot 5, Multnomah County Courthouse and more

Station Place Lot 5

Station Place Lot 5

The City Council heard the appeal of Preserve the Pearl LLC against the Design Commission’s decision to approve Block 136. Comments for or against the appeal can be sent to cctestimony@portlandoregon.gov until 5pm on April 15th. The Council will deliberate on April 23rd.

The Portland Development Commission board has voted to sell Station Place Lot 5 to Williams & Dame for $7.4 million. The developers plans to build a 204,000 sq ft office building on the vacant Pearl District land.

Grocery store Market of Choice and hardware store Orchard Supply will be the anchor retail tenants for LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, which is now under construction.

According to a post at The Portland Chronicle, demolition has begun on the Spring Market building on SE Hawthorne Blvd. In its place will be the Hawthorne 31 apartments by TVA Architects and VWR Development.

An article in today’s Oregonian covers OMSI’s desire for housing to be allowed on land it owns in the Central Eastside. The City is currently working on a draft of the SE Quadrant Plan, which will guide the zoning for the area for the next 20 years.

The Post Office Redevelopment could be a ‘golden opportunity for bikeway’, says BikePortlandWork on the  Broadway Corridor Framework Plan, which includes in the USPS site, will begin this year.

The Portland Development Commission has issued a Request for Proposals for Riverplace Parcel 3. Working with the Portland Housing Bureau, they hope to create at least 200 affordable homes on the site.

At Portland Architecture Brian Libby asked whether Portland can grow the right way.

A photo gallery at the Daily Journal of Commerce shows the progress on the Park Avenue West tower.

The Portland Development Commission has reissued a Request for Proposals for NE 106th & Halsey. According to the Portland Business Journal, the PDC is willing to “donate the land at no cost or channel up to $3 million in public funding” to secure the kind of development it wants to see.

A due diligence report [PDF] on the Multnomah County Courthouse was presented to the County board. The two sites currently being considered for the new courthouse are at the Hawthorne Bridgehead, and adjacent to the KOIN tower. No fatal flaw was found for either site, and the site at the Hawthorne Bridgehead remains the preferred site.

Weekly Roundup: changes in the Central Eastside, Downtown and Goose Hollow

The Goat Blocks

The Goat Blocks

  • In “The Central Question: Can industry, ambition and development mix in Portland’s Central Eastside?” the Oregonian wrote about the changes the neighborhood is going through, with the Goat Blocks being of particular concern to industrial users in the area.
  • Places over Time published an article titled “In Defense of Change,” a reaction to the anti-development rhetoric of the last year in Portland.
  • The Portland Business Journal looked at what’s contained in the latest version of Portland’s West Quadrant Plan, with articles about Downtown and Goose Hollow.
  • Also in the Portland Business Journal: the current Northwest Portland Cash & Carry will close in April and move to a larger unit. The site is due to be redeveloped by Mill Creek Residential Trust at 1420 Pearl.
  • The Portland Chronicle published photos of the site at NE 28th and Glisan that’s set to redeveloped as a 4-story apartment building.

LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)

The first construction permits have been approved for LOCA @ the Goat Blocks, a mixed use development in the Central Eastside.  The project, by developer Killian Pacific and architects Ankrom Moisan, is planned for a vacant site most recently occupied by a herd of goats. The name “LOCA”, according to an article in the Portland Tribune, is “a multiple pun on location, locavore, and crazy.”

The project includes 97,000 square feet of retail space and 247 apartments. The retail portion will be anchored by a hardware store and a grocery store, whose tenants have yet to be announced. 139 vehicular parking spaces will be provided for residents, and 246 for the retail uses. 43 short term and 510 long term bicycle parking spaces will be provided.

Goat Blocks viewed from SE Belmont & 10th

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