Weekly Roundup: Pearl East, 1725 SE Tenino, 5035 NE Sandy and more

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan, by Mackenzie

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan is currently being reviewed by the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission. According to the DJC the Commission appeared inclined to support the project*, but granted a request by a neighbor to extend the public comment period.

‘Portland For Everyone’ wrote about two buildings in Sellwood-Moreland, at 1707-1725 SE Tenino St and 5965-6003 SE Milwaukie Ave that could be the first buildings to include affordable housing through the Portland’s new Inclusionary Zoning ordinance. Though vested under the old code, the developer is exploring the option of removing the previously required parking spaces and adding affordable units.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about the new development at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd, on the site formerly home to der Rheinlander. The 32,000 sq ft building will include 24,000 square feet leased by Portland Clinic and 6,000 to 8,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

The Willamette Week wrote about how “early signs point to trouble for a record-setting Portland Public Schools bond“. If passed, the $790 bond would include funding to renovate Benson High School and Madison High School, and to raze and rebuild Lincoln High School and Kellogg Middle School.

Oregon Business published images of Portland’s “latest Insta-worthy hotel“, the AC by Marriott.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Robert Sacks, Schools Bond, SolTerra, and more

A potential massing for a rebuilt Lincoln High School, by Bora Architects. Under this option the existing school would remain in operation while a new building is constructed where the football field is currently located.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools now plans to include complete modernization of three high schools, Lincoln, Benson and Madison, in its May 2017 bond measure.

In the wake of the NW Portland natural gas explosion, the DJC wrote about developer Robert Sacks’ plans to move forward*.  Allied Works Architecture, who designed the damaged building 2281 NW Glisan, are preparing drawings that will allow the building to be rebuild. They are also working on designs for a new three-story building building at 510 NW 23rd Ave to replace the 111-year-old building that was destroyed.

Places Over Time looked at the 2016 works of architecture and urban planning that have “creatively added to the livability, artistry, and longevity of Portland’s built environment“, including Albina Yard, Pearl West and Milwaukie Way.

A 100-bed winter shelter has opened in the Washington Center, reported The Oregonian. The building is currently sitting vacant while developer Greystar and architects ZGF prepares plans for the 4W Tower.

The Portland Chronicle reported that a 106-year-old apartment complex and automotive repair shop at 1335 SE Stark St will be torn down to make way for a four-story, 39-unit apartment complex.

The DJC reported that design-build firm SolTerra has split into two businesses and laid off design professionals.

The Business Tribune asked developers if they would still build housing in PDX under the inclusionary zoning policy.

The Portland Business Journal looked at the 34 most prominent real estate projects to watch in 2017.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Press Blocks, The Woodlark, Hyatt House, and more

Press Blocks

Concept for the full block building at the Press Blocks, by Mithun

The Business Tribune wrote about the Press Blocks, the redevelopment of the former Oregonian Publishing Buildings in Goose Hollow. The project would include two buildings. One building would occupy a full city block and another a half block, and are being designed by Mithun and GBD Architects respectively.

The DJC published photos of the under construction Rivage Apartmentsformerly known as Riverscape Lot 8.

The Oregonian wrote about a Chinese group protesting the decision to hang banners in Chinatown with the name “New Chinatown/Japan Town”.  Though listed on the National Register of Historic Places under that name, it is otherwise rarely used.

The Oregonian reported that “outrage surges” as the deadline to put the $750 million Portland Public Schools bond on the November ballot has passed. If passed on the May ballot, which is much likely, the measure would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School. Students at Lincoln High left class to protest the decision not to place the measure on the November ballot.

Portland Architecture interviewed Bora’s Brad Demby about the Cosmopolitan on the Park, the now complete high rise at the north end of the Pearl District.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at The Woodlarkthe new Downtown hotel that will open in 2017. The hotel will combine two buildings: the Woodlark Building, most recently used as an office; the Hotel Cornelius, which has long been vacant.

The Hyatt House at Riverplace is now open, reports the Portland Business Journal. The hotel includes 203 extended-stay rooms.

Weekly Roundup: Convention Center Hotel, International School, Schools bond, and more

Convention Center Hotel

The proposed Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The Business Tribune wrote about “Portland’s new international front porch“—the Convention Center Hotel. The Hyatt Regency branded hotel recently went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Review hearing.

A change in policy at the Bureau of Development Services means that ranked properties on the city’s Historic Resources Inventory will now be subject to a 120 day demolition delay, even if the property owner requests that it be removed from the Inventory.

The Business Tribune wrote about how advocacy organization Restore Oregon wants to ensure that “we don’t want to lose those things that make Portland Portland” as the city grows.

As thousands of units per year get built in Portland, the DJC looked at how much parking developers are choosing to build. While investors once demanded a 1:1 parking to units ratio, 0.6:1—or less—has become common.

The Business Tribune reported that despite ongoing building boom, “Oregon’s construction industry ranked 47th overall in contribution to state GDP.”

Construction has finished on the International School Expansionreports the Portland Business Journal. According to the paper the school “kicked off the school year this week with a ribbon cutting ceremony for its new Learners’ Hall, a 10-classroom building for fourth- and fifth-grade students”.

The Willamette Week reported that parents are warning that delays to Portland Public Schools’ $750 million bond could doom it to failure. If passed, the bond would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School.

Weekly Roundup: Hotels booming, Multifamily cooling, Schools bond and more

129 SE Alder

129 SE Alder is the latest creative office development in the Central Eastside

The Oregonian reported that Portland’s hotel boom—which includes the Cornelius-Woodlark, Canopy Hotel, Porter Hotel, AC Hoteland the Convention Center Hotel—will by 2020 result in 40% more hotel rooms than there are now.

The Willamette Week opined that “Portland City Hall seems to have learned its lesson about parking minimums raising rents” as the City Council struck down a proposal to add parking minimums for new residential development in the Northwest Plan District.

The DJC reported* that the Metro area multifamily market is beginning to cool as “after years of apartment development, supply appears to be starting to make a dent in demand”.

Harsch Investment Properties revealed a new creative office projected planned for 129 SE Alder St (previously 110 SE Washington St) to the Portland Business Journal. The design of the 9 story building is by Works Partnership.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools will seek voter approval for a $750 million construction bond in November. If passed, the bond would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Mill Creek Residential Trust paid Meriwether Partners $13.2 million for the former Premier Press building in the Pearl, a significant increase over the $6.05 million paid for the property in 2014. The transaction will allow the mixed use project at 505 NW 14th Ave to grow larger, at the expense of the now cancelled 1440 Hoyt office development.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Metro Reports: Madison High School, Towne Storage, 2211 NW York St and more

Madison High School

Concept for a modernized Madison High School, by Opsis Architecture + Dao Architecture

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested for the Madison High School Modernization project:

CU master plan for Madison High School modernization.

Early Assistance has been requested by BAMA Architecture and Design for a project at 15215 SE Powell Blvd:

Demo and rebuild new residential care facility – 25 beds – no parking on site

The renovation of the Towne Storage Building by LRS Architects has been submitted for building permit review:

Renovation of existing historic Town Storage building with a new roof top 6th floor addition

A project at 6003 SW Virginia Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

Construct new, 3 story, 19 unit apartment building, no parking, trash room is at interior ground floor, includes associated site work

A project at 6349 NE 27th Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Mackenzie:

Construct new, 2 story office building with covered porch and accessible ramp at north elevation, includes offices, conference rooms, restrooms, break room with sink and dishwasher, associated site work included

A project at 2211 NW York St has been submitted for building permit review:

New 113,479 GSF, six story self storage facility, demo permit to be applied later

A building permit was issued to Mackenzie for a project at 3011 NE Killingsworth St (formerly 3009 NE Killingsworth St):

New mixed use building – four floors of apartments with retail component on ground level, 30 units total

A building permit was issued for a project at 13643 E Burnside St (formerly 13641 E Burnside St):

Construct new 1 story six plex; with associated site work; 3 detached trash areas less than 120 sf