Weekly Roundup: Willamette Blocks, Rocket Empire Machine, River District Navigation Center, and more

The Willamette Blocks proposal by developer Alamo Manhattan was presented to the Design Commission last week.

The Willamette Blocks proposal in South Waterfront (previously known as the Landing at Macadam) is facing a blacklash* from nearby residents, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

OPB covered the River District Navigation Center (previously known as the Oregon Harbor of Hope) which opened after the largest-ever single contribution to Portland and Multnomah County’s shelter system.

The Portland Tribune wrote about a work session on the Housing Opportunity Initiative—the combined package of the Residential Infill Project, Better Housing By Design and the Anti-Displacement Action Plan. Later in the year City Council will consider a plan to allow up sixplexes on lots currently zoned single family, if half of the units in the structure are affordable.

A new food hall and brewpub will open in Montavilla’s Rocket Empire Machine, writes Eater Portland.

The Land Use Board of Appeals (LUBA) has remanded the Central City 2035 Plan, over the issue of building heights allowed in Chinatown. In 2018 City Council settled on a 200′ height limit for parts of the district, replacing previous zoning that ranged from 100′ to 425′. Critics said that a 200′ height limit is too high. LUBA decided that the City did not adopt adequate findings to explain why 200′ complied with its adopted policies.

The Nature Conservancy showcases its mission with revamped Portland headquarters, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Portland Architecture considered height limits in the Pearl and Old Town, with the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences in mind.

The Oregonian reports that after “a brief reprieve, Portland-area rents are starting to tick up again.”

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Weekly Roundup: Division 28 Homes, Oregon Harbor of Hope and Live Nation South Waterfront

Hacker Architects are designing the Division 28 Homes, which were recently presented to the Design Commission.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the Division 28 Homes, a 10-unit mixed-use building that “looks to foster a sense of community.”*

The Live Nation South Waterfront venue is raising concerns about noise and traffic, reports the Business Tribune.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter and navigation center has opened in the Pearl, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Centennial Mills, 72 Foster, Oregon Harbor of Hope, and more

The recently completed 72 Foster building includes 101 units of affordable housing. It will also include a pizza restaurant at its ground floor.

Prosper Portland’s efforts to redevelop Centennial Mills have once again fallen through, with developer Lynd Corporate choosing not to move forward with a project on the site, reports Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported that Portland Public Schools construction costs could top $1 billion and that “district officials lack ‘rationale or explanation’ for low-ball estimates.”

An appeal of the design review approval* for the Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter and navigation center went in front of the Design Commission, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for Northwest Housing Alternatives’ latest affordable housing development at 9747 NE Glisan St, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Pizzeria Otto will open a second location in the ground floor of 72 Foster, reports the Oregonian.

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Metro Reports: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Moxy Hotel, 4804 SE Woodstock, and more

Moxy Hotel
A building permit has been issued for the 197 room Moxy Hotel, which will be built at SW 10th and Alder.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers February 4th to February 10th, 2019. 

Early Assistance has been requested by Leeb Architects for a project at 4804 SE Woodstock Blvd:

Proposed full block building at SE Woodstock and 48th Avenue consists of 178 apartments on five floors. The building also includes a full basement with parking for 130 automobiles spaces. There is also a 5,000 SF commercial retail space on the Ground Floor. The structure of the building will be comprised of a concrete basement level (parking garage) with five floors of wood frame residential construction above

A project at 7433 N Chicago Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New three story 11 unit apartment building with shared cortyard (see 19115675 CO)

New 12 unit three story apartment building with shared cortyard (see 19-115695 CO)

The Meyer Memorial Trust Headquarters at 2045 N Vancouver Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New construction of 3 story office building and associated sitework

A building permit was issued to Opsis Architecture for the Oregon Harbor of Hope at 1111 NW Naito Parkway:

New navigation center to provide short-term shelter and navigation toward social service programs

A building permit was issued for the Moxy Hotel at 585 SW 10th Ave:

New 12 story, 197 unit hotel w/ associated sitework (no onsite parking); ecoroof *** mechanical permit to be separate ***

Weekly Roundup: Hallock-McMillan Building, Beatrice Morrow, the Hoxton, and more

Hallock-McMillan Building
Work has started on the restoration of the Hallock-McMillan Building. Design work for the restoration is being led by Emerick Architects, for building owner Russell Fellows Properties.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the rehabilitation of the Hallock-McMillan Building. The city’s oldest commercial building is “receiving a major renovation intended to restore the look and feel of the original brick masonry and cast iron.”

The Willamette Week reported that months after completion the Beatrice Morrow, an affordable housing development on NE MLK, was mostly empty despite applications from more than 1,500 people.

Portland Architecture spoke to Surround Architecture’s Mark VanderZanden and Ennismore’s Chris Stringfellow about how the old Grove Hotel became The Hoxton.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter and navigation center, reports the Portland Tribune.

Weekly Roundup: Albina Vision, Lloyd Center Bowlero, Oregon Harbor of Hope, and more

The Albina Vision would include a new waterfront public space, at the concourse level of Veterans Memorial Coliseum. The park would span over N Interstate Avenue and the freight rail line.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the Albina Vision, an effort by civic leaders to heal the district with intentional development that reverses displacement, with new public spaces, mixed income housing and cultural buildings.

Proposed legislation could eliminate a potential funding source for the Portland Diamond Project, writes the Willamette Week.

A Bowlero-branded bowling alley is proposed for the Lloyd Center, according to the Oregonian.

The Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center is already attracting attention in Portland — and beyond, according to the Business Tribune.

The Design Commission has approved the Grand Avenue Mixed Use, a 170-unit building in the Central Eastside, writes the Oregonian.

Portland Architecture had a conversation with Holst Architecture principal Dave Otte about the firm’s transition to new leadership.

The Hyatt Place in the Pearl would likely be the city’s tallest building to have no on-site parking, according to Portlanders for Parking Reform.

The Oregonian reports that ground has been broken on the Fourth and Montgomery Building, the downtown classroom, clinic and office building that will house programs of three higher education institutions and Portland’s city government.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope could be open by this summer. Originally planned as private endeavor, the shelter and navigation center will receive $1 million in funding from the Joint Office of Homeless Services, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, Nesika Illahee, Nature Conservancy, and more

Portland Diamond Project

The Portland Diamond Project has proposed an MLB stadium on the banks of the Willamette.

The Portland Diamond Project has an agreement with the Port of Portland to build an MLB stadium on the Terminal 2 site, reports the Oregonian. The paper also reported that Mayor Wheeler said the city “wouldn’t pay for a stadium or buy a team” but could “absorb some costs related to transportation and other infrastructure such as utility service”, and looked into what we know (and don’t know) about the proposal.  BikePortland looked at the access issues around the proposed riverfront stadium. The Portland Business Journal asked its readers what they think about the stadium.

The Business Tribune reported on Nesika Illahee (formerly known as Holman 42), which includes units reserved for members of federally recognized tribes.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how the Nature Conservancy is “sprucing up its Oregon headquarters with tons of timber“.

TMT Development, best know its development of downtown high rises, has completed The Marilyn at 2310 SE Hawthorne Blvd. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the 59-unit mixed use building.

The Oregonian reports that the City Council declined to block the affordable housing development proposed at 1727 NW Hoyt St.

The Oregonian looked at whether the site under the Broadway Bridge is too contaminated for the Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter.

The Portland Timbers will play their first 12 games on the road in 2019 due to construction of the Providence Park Expansion, reports the Oregonian. The club now  “expects the expansion project to be completed by late May or early June 2019.”

Metro Reports: Four and Montgomery, 722 SE 10th, 82nd Ave Smart Foodservice, and more

The 7-story Four and Montgomery Building will include space for PSU, OHSU, PCC and the City of Portland.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers July 30th to August 5th, 2018. 

The Oregon Harbor of Hope at 1201 Northwest Naito Parkway has been submitted for building permit review by Opsis Architecture:

New navigation center to provide short-term shelter and navigation toward social service programs

A project at 722 SE 10th Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Merryman Barnes Architects:

Addition for (N) mezzanine for office and storage; TI for new tenant (indoor cart pod); change of occupancy from S3 to A2; add new interior walls to create (2) multi-stall restrooms, (8) food pods, bar area on first floor; seismic upgrades

A project at 5605 SE Division St has been submitted for building permit review:

Construct new 2 story restaurant; main floor to include kitchen area, restrooms, and seating area; 2nd fl to include outdoor seating, break area, office, and dining area; new landscape and trash enclosure under 120 sq ft

The PSU Four+Montgomery building at 401 SW Harrison St (also known as the Jasmine Block) has been submitted for building permit review by SRG Partnership:

New 3/4 block, 7 story, mixed use building that will house groups from PSU, OHSU, PCC and the City of Portland

A building permit was issued to EPR Design for a project at 1600 N Willis Blvd:

New 3-story, 9 unit apartment building with interior garbage room, includes associated site work.

A building permit was issued for the 82nd Avenue Smart Foodservice Cash & Carry at 8250 SE Stark St:

New 20,480 sf grocery store with 2 walk-in coolers, office, 2 bathrooms, break room, storage room at loading dock, and associated site work inlcuding expanded parking lot ***with detached trash enclosure <120 sq ft*** ***separate mechanical permit for hvac and refrigeration***

Weekly Roundup: Lincoln High School, Oregon Harbor of Hope, Broadway Corridor, and more

Lincoln High School

The new Lincoln High School will be built at the west side of the campus, allowing the existing school to remain open during construction. The new school is being designed by Bora Architects.

The Lincoln High School Rebuild went in front of the Design Commission for the first time. The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the reception it received.*

Eater Portland reported that Bamboo Sushi offshoot QuickFish will open its third location in Heartline on August 15th.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter and navigation center is half a million dollars over budget, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland Housing Bureau is teaming with three other public agencies to provide more than $12 million for projects that combine housing and mental health services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

A group called the Healthy Communities Coalition is pushing for a massive number of affordable units at the Broadway Corridor, according to the Willamette Week.

Cafe Hey Love Superette has opened in the lobby of Jupiter NEXT Hotelwith coffee, pastries and CBD lattes, writes Eater Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Metro Reports: ART Tower, Rothko Pavilion, Adidas Intersection, and more

ART Tower

The 304 unit ART Tower is proposed for the north half of the Artist Repertory Theatre block in Goose Hollow.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers July 2nd to July 8th, 2018. 

Early Assistance has been requested by Guerrilla Development for a project at 3839 NE Killingsworth St:

Convert a warehouse/storefront building with existing church use into a six (6) one-bedroom loft style residential units with shared and private courtyards. Courtyards will be created by removing portions of existing roofing. 20% unit density increase to be achieved through amenity bonuses.

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled to discuss a project at 144 NE 97th Ave:

Proposal is for a multifamily project designed to maximize site efficiency and provide high-quality, family size housing. Project contains two, 4-story buildings totaling 64 units on 3 x RX lots. Project includes 24 x 3 bedroom units (bu), 6 x 2bu, 32 x 1 bu, and 2 studios. Parking is .4 to 1 (26 stalls). A leasing office and bike storage are onsite. Stormwater management to be achieved onsite using category 1 and 2 methods, including roof drainage to a drywell and parking lot to biofiltration devices, including but not limited to infiltration swales and/or basins

The Portland Art Museum Rothko Pavilion at 1219 SW Park Ave has been submitted for a Type III Historic Resource Review and a Type II Conditional Use Review by Hennebery Eddy Architects:

New 3-story pavillion connecting the existing North and South Portland Art Museum Buildings. There will also be a new loading area along SW Jefferson St, which requires a separate driveway design exception (per PBOT).

The Oregon Harbor of Hope at 1201 Northwest Naito Parkway has been submitted for Type II Design Review:

Construction of the Navigation Center, a short-term shelter and resource center for Oregon Harbor of Hope.

The ART Tower at 1515 SW Morrison St has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Ankrom Moisan Architects:

Proposal to demolish portion of existing building on nw quarter of the block and surface parking lot at NE quarter of the block. New construction of 21 story mixed use residential building on the north half of the block. Retail, lobby and amenities at the ground floor. Parking below grade.

A new Type III Design Review Application for the Lloyd West Anchor Remodel has been submitted by Waterleaf Architecture:

Renovation of existing retail mall anchor to accommodate multiple tenants, increasing the existing height by one story. The renovation includes the SW corner of the existing mall known as Block A and the exterior facade remodel and plaza/yard improvements on the south, west, and north sides of existing building. One modification requested to the bicycle parking standards.

The Intersection on the Adidas campus at 5055 N Greeley Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Hacker Architects:

new addition between buildings B and C on the West side of the Adidas village campus