Weekly Roundup: Eleven West, Housing Bond, Office Development, and more

Eleven West is being designed by ZGF Architects, who also designed the nearby Twelve West tower

The Oregonian wrote about Eleven West, the 24-story tower with swimming pool planned for downtown Portland’s West End.

The Willamette Week wrote about how Mayor Wheeler has “blown past a deadline his own office set for starting to spend a $258 million bond approved by voters last November to build and rehab affordable housing units”.

Portland Architecture took a look at the offices of Stoel Rives and Simple, respectively located in Park Avenue West and Clay Creative.

The Portland Business Journal looked at how the Goat Blocks are bringing “new flair to a transforming neighborhood.”

An analysis by the Business Tribune showed that the real estate market in Portland is moving towards the construction of office space.

Weekly Roundup: Portland Building, 2869 NE Sandy, Stagecraft Building, and more

Rendering of a renovated loggia on SW Madison St at the Portland Building (DLR Group)

In an article titled “Handling a Portland icon with care“* the DJC looked at the approach being taken for the renovation of the Portland Building.

The Willamette Week reported that newly seated Mayor Ted Wheeler has halted further spending of the $258.4 million affordable housing bond, in order to to set “priorities and goals“.

Portland Shoupistas suggested 6 Parking Policy Priorities for Portland in 2017.

Portland Architecture sat down with Thomas Henneberry of ZRZ Realty to discuss the ambitious plans for the Zidell Yards.

Despite initial reports that the building might be relocated, the Portland Mercury reported that Club 21 last day of business would be January 15th. The building will be demolished to make way for the Jantzen Apartments.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Park Avenue West has landed an iconic Oregon tenant, Pendleton Woolen Mills.

According to the Urban Works Blog Design Within Reach has opened its new store in the renovated Stagecraft Building.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Fairfield Residential paid $3.6 million for a five-parcel lot at 2869 NE Sandy Blvd. The are current plans to develop the site with a 206 unit, 6-story apartment building.

OPB’s State of Wonder discussed design, planning and Portland’s new Mayor Ted Wheeler.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Fair Haired Dumbell, AIA Portland Awards, PSU School of Business Administration, and more

Fair Haired Dumbell

The Fair-Haired Dumbell will have a facade painted with a mural by Los Angeles-based artist James Jean

The DJC wrote about the ‘elaborate’ Building Information Modelling (BIM) process* being used to help deliver the PSU School of Business Administration.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the paint scheme has been chosen Fair-Haired Dumbbell building, and “it’s unlike anything else in town“.  They also revealed that co-working company TENpod will occupy 8,000 sq ft in the building.

The Oregonian reported that the Sears building in the Lloyd Center has been sold, and the retailer’s presence in the mall “will either shrink significantly or disappear altogether“.  On Thursday morning, the ice rink at the center of the mall reopened, after a major renovation.

Eater PDX reported that Tom’s First Avenue Bento will close after nearly 25 years, to make way for the Multnomah County Central Courthouse.

The 12-unit Jarrett Street Condos are receiving very little interest from those eligible to receive the city subsidized down-payment assistance, according to The Oregonian.

Portland Architecture wrote about the winning projects at the AIA Portland Architecture Awards. Buildings honored include Slate, 1638 NW Overton St, Framework (CEID), Albina Yard, Karuna at One North, The Cosmopolitan on the Park and Park Avenue West.

Preservation group Restore Oregon announced their top restoration projects of 2016, including the Pine Street Market and the Society Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal showcased the “stellar views and cool workspaces” at Slate.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Residential Infill Project, Design Overlay Zone Assessment, Affordable Housing Bond and more

Residential Infill Project

The Residential Infill Project has released recommendations for changes to the zoning in Portland’s single family residential zones. One of the proposed changes is reduced the allowable height of flat roofs from 30′ to 25′.

The Portland Business Journal wrote that jazz club Jimmy Mak’s has found a new home, with an exterior courtyard. The Pearl District bar is relocating to make way for the Modera Davis apartment building.

The Business Tribune reported that work is beginning on the Design Overlay Zone Assessment project. As Portland gets ready to expand the number of areas covered by Design Review it has asked consultants to perform an independent, comprehensive assessment of the city’s design overlay zone.

Work is about to begin on the Broadway Tower, according to the Portland Business Journal. The 19 story tower will include a Radisson Red hotel and 175,000 sq ft of office space.

The Portland Business Journal had a look inside Stoel Rives’ “lofty new digs” at Park Avenue West.

KGW reported that demands for Portland’s core housing leaves suburbs slow to grow.

Details of the $258.4 million affordable housing bond that will be on the November ballot were published in the Portland Mercury.

Portland is seeking feedback on the Residential Infill Project, and is holding a series of open houses. An online open house will accept comments until August 15th 2015. A letter to the editor the Portland Chronicle was critical of the project, and argued that the City is “failing its promise to the majority of its citizens”.

Weekly Roundup: Bridgetown, Fern Grove, Langano Apartments and more

Framework

LEVER Architecture’s Framework will be a 12 story tall timber building.

In ‘Death of a Mall Rat‘ the Portland Mercury wrote about the Lloyd Center, which is currently in the middle of a major remodel. As Portland changes, the paper wondered whether the 1960s mall can keep up.

Commissioner Dan Saltzman is proposing a 1% Construction Excise Tax, according to The Oregonian. The City’s ability to impose the tax was made possible by a recent change in Oregon law. The law requires that at least 50% of the revenues from the tax be used for providing affordable housing. Commissioner Saltzman, who oversees the Portland Housing Bureau, wishes to see 100% of the tax dedicated to affordable housing.

In a blog post the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis explained that “housing does filter”. New construction that is that the top end of the market eventually becomes much lower priced relative to the overall housing market.

The Portland Tribune reported that a panel of state economists and housing experts told a State legislative committee that a “confluence of factors — including low supply, high demand, obstructive regulations and lacking infrastructure — is driving up housing prices in the state”.

Portland Shoupistas wondered if the City Council will impose “rent-raising minimum requirements in NW PDX?” A proposal to add parking minimums in the Northwest Plan District was recently rejected by the Planning & Sustainability Commission, however NW neighbors are trying convince the City Council to add them back at a July 6th hearing.

The Oregonian wrote about the ‘Portland for Everyone’ housing coalition, which is “calling on Portland leaders to increase density in single-family residential neighborhoods, strengthen renter protections and put a general obligation bond on November’s ballot that would fund affordable housing.”

The Portland Business Journal wrote that the 12 story timber framed tower Framework (pictured above) is moving forward—and with a deeper level of affordability. The 60 units in the mixed use building were originally planned to be offered to people earning less than 80% of area Median Family Income. The units will now be offered to people earning less than 60% area MFI. The building is set to go before the Design Commission on July 7th.

The Oregonian covered a report by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, which found that the hourly wage needed to afford a two-bedroom apartment in Oregon rose from $16.61 hourly wage in 2015 to $19.38 in 2016.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the office space at the Park Avenue West tower is now nearly all taken. The residential leasing is proceeding more slowly, with only a quarter of the units taken. In a separate interview with the paper TMT Development president Vanessa Sturgeon states that she’s “just fine” with the pace that units are leasing at.

A post at Planetizen asked if Portland has “lost is way”. The article argues that “Oregon’s poster child for livable planning is embroiled in new controversies over destructive growth, skyrocketing prices, and back-room cronyism.”

The Hollywood Star News reported that construction is about to start on the Bridgetown Apartments at the former Red Fig property in Beaumont Village. The project by Ethos Development and Siteworks Design/Build will include 50 residential units and 6,000 sq ft of retail space.

A 33-unit affordable housing complex in East Portland has opened, according to The Oregonian. The Fern Grove apartments at 14232 E Burnside St are set to be affordable to people earning less than 60% of area Median Family Income.

The retail spaces at the Langano Apartments have been leased, according to Urban Works Real Estate. The ground floor of the SE Hawthorne Blvd building will include Poke Mon, a poke bowl restaurant, as well as an M Realty office and Gallery Nucleus, an art gallery featuring a taproom.

The Cook Street Apartments on N Williams Ave have been sold to Boston-based Berkshire Group, for a undisclosed sum. The LRS Architects-designed building includes 206 residential units.

KGW reported that Exhaust Specialties at 700 SE Belmont St will close after 65 years in operation. Though no permits have been filed for the redevelopment of the site, an Early Assistance application was received by the City in February for a new self-storage facility.

Weekly Roundup: Pearl East, Park Avenue West, Stagecraft Building and more

The Pearl East building at NW 13th and Glisan

The Pearl East building at NW 13th and Glisan

Modern furniture retailer Design Within Reach will move into the Pearl’s newly renovated Stagecraft Building, according to the Portland Business Journal.

A new 6 story office building is planned for the corner of NE 13th Ave and Glisan St, reported the Portland Business Journal. The Mackenzie designed Pearl East building will include 67,000 sq ft of office and retail space.

The Oregonian published photos of the completed Park Avenue West tower. The building includes 15 floors of apartments, 13 floors of office space and 2 floors of retail space.

Salt and Straw revealed images of their new soft serve ice cream concept, Wiz Bang, which will open in the Pine Street Market on April 1st.

Weekly Roundup: Framework, Park Avenue West, Block 75 Phase II and more

The 12 story Framework building by Lever Architecture, planned for a site as NW 11th & Glisan in the Pearl

The 12 story Framework building by Lever Architecture, planned for a site at NW 10th & Glisan in the Pearl

In an article titled “Wooden Buildings as Strong as Steel” Newsweek wrote about how Portland is leading the nation in the adoption of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT). The article includes quotes from Ben Kaiser of PATH, architect and developer of Carbon12and Thomas Robinson of Lever who is the architect for Framework in the Pearl and Albina Yard.

An article and photo gallery in the Portland Business Journal showed how CLT is made. Riddle-based D.R. Johnson Lumber Co is currently the only domestic lumber mill certified as capable of producing the wood panels.

The Portland Business Journal covered Block 75 Phase IIthe next high-rise building planned for the Burnside Bridgehead. The Works Partnership designed building is the latest partnership between Beam Development and Urban Development + Partners.

The Oregonian noted that a Travel Portland found that hotel prices have soared since 2010. The rising rates have led to a hotel construction boom, as Next Portland covered last year.

Construction is underway on the expansion of the SERA designed NW Portland International HostelIn a story about the project KGW wrote that the hostel is trying “to keep up with the booming tourism in the Rose City”.

The Portland City Council approved a realignment to the route of the proposed extension of SW Bond between the Tilikum Crossing and SW River Parkway. The extension, which will begin construction this year, allows OHSU projects including the Knight Cancer Research Building to move head.

The first residential tenants are moving into Park Avenue Westreported the Portland Business Journal. The TVA Architects designed building is now the fourth tallest building in Portland.

The Portland Development Commission is increasing its contribution to projects in Lents by $6.3 million, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects include the Asian Health and Services Center by Holst Architecture, Oliver Station by Ankrom Moisan Architects and 9101 SE Foster Rd by Hacker Architects. The developers behind Oliver Station have gained control of the Chevron station at SE 92nd and Foster, enabling the project to occupy the full block.

Commissioner Steve Novick wrote about an idea that is rapidly gaining traction as a way to bring affordability back to Portland’s neighborhoods. “Missing middle housing” is new term for old styles of development, currently prohibited in most of Portland, at a density between that of single family detached houses and large mid-rise apartment buildings. These include housing types such as rowhomes, courtyard apartments, triplexes, built to the same height and scale as single-family homes.

A post at Portland Shoupistas asked if the PDC’s $26 million garage at the Convention Center Hotel  will be a money maker or a money loser. Though planned as  revenue generator, the post points out that “just to break even, this garage will need to generate more than $12 per space every day of every year for 20 years, starting in 2020.”

KOIN reported that “Ivy Island may not be ‘gateway’ to St. Johns for long“. A street vacation in the St Johns neighborhood was approved this week. The vacation will allow the mixed use Union at St Johns building by Jones Architecture to move ahead, while creating a safer road layout.

 

Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

While Portland has long been considered a desirable place to live, it has traditionally lagged its suburbs—Washington County particulary—in income and job growth. Following the recession this appears to have changed. Employers increasingly desire a location in central Portland. As commercial vacancy rates have dropped and rental rates gone up there has been a sudden influx of new office proposals.

The vast majority of these are speculative projects, where the developer starts work on the project without a specific tenant in mind. Only three of the buildings—the Daimler Trucks North America HQ, the Multnomah County Health Department HQ and the Seven Corners Community Collaborative—are planned for a specific end user.

Click through to see our roundup of the major projects going on right now, arranged in no specific order. Where a significant portion of the building will be used for functions other than office, the area of the office floors alone has been given. Note that the area of any building may not be directly comparable to another due to differences in methods for how floor area is calculated.

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Weekly Roundup: PDX Concourse E Extension, Grant High Modernization, Redd on Salmon Street and more

Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension

Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension

The Oregonian published images of the Portland International Airport Concourse E Extension, which will be used by Horizon Air. As part of a large project, Alaska Airlines will move from the south side of the airport to the north, while United will relocate from the north to the south.

Portland Architecture made the case for the preservation of Veteran’s Memorial Coliseum, as new study has come out with multiple options for the building.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the office space in Park Avenue West is now entirely leased, with Morgan Stanley taking the final two available floors. Leasing has also begun on the apartment units.

Mahlum have been selected as the architects for the Grant High School Modernization, according to the Hollywood Star News. Construction on the project is scheduled to begin in 2017.

The latest retail tenant at the LL Hawkins and Slabtown Marketplace is the Consolidated Community Credit Union, reported the Portland Business Journal.

A four story, 30 unit mixed use building is proposed for 1515 SE 44th Ave. The Portland Chronicle looked at the existing house on the site, which may or may not be demolished as part of the project.

Thomas Robinson of Lever Architecture was interviewed on OPB’s ‘Think Out Loud’ about Framework, the planned 12 story wood building set to go up in the Pearl.

The Redd on Salmon Street has won a design award for resilience, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The Portland Chronicle covered the history of an industrial building in Sellwood at 8222 SE 6th Ave, set to be replaced by a mixed use development.

Construction on The Ella in South Waterfront is moving into its final phases, according to the Portland Business Journal. The 6 story building utilized a pre-fabricated wood framing system, which minimized construction waste on site.

Weekly Roundup: Lents Town Center, Loyal Legion, Langano Apartments and more

Lents Town Center Property #2

Lents Town Center Property #2, including the New Copper Penny site

The Portland Development Commission will vote next week on whether to offer financial support to the three development projects in Lents. The developments include: a development by Palindrome Communities on Lents Town Center Property #2, which will also include the New Copper Penny site; a development by Williams & Dame on  Lents Town Center Property #3 (South); and a third by Asian Health & Services Center Lents Town Center Property #4.

The Loyal Legion, the new bar by ChefStable in the I. O. O. F. Orient Lodge / PPAA Building will open to the public on July 8th. A pre-opening event hosted by Restore Oregon will take place on July 3rd, where guests will receive guided tours of the newly renovated building.

The City Council discussed the zoning map amendment that will allow the Multnomah County Health Department HQ to be up to 150′ tall. A vote will be held next week.

A 6 week old restaurant was named by The Oregonian as its restaurant of the year. Renata recently opened in the former warehouse at 626 SE Main.

The growth scenarios in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan show that Portland is expected to gain 94,000 new apartments between 2010 and 2035, but only 17,000 new single family homes.

The new headquarters for SolTerra Systems at 2422 SE 9th Ave will be the tallest building on the west coast built with insulated concrete forms. Other sustainable features will include a green roof and low flow plumbing fixtures.

The Portland Business Journal published a photo gallery of Park Avenue Westthe downtown skyscraper scheduled for completion in December.

Tenants are now moving into the Langano Apartments, according to the Portland Chronicle. The building is owned by Petros Jarra and Ainalem Sultessa, immigrants who formerly operated Jarra’s Ethiopian Restaurant on the same site.

The Oregonian reported on the new building proposed at 4th & Harrison, which will include 425 apartments targeted to students at PSU. The developer hopes to open the building in 2018.

The East Building at One North is nearly finished. The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about how the building will serve as a model for sustainability.