Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, 126 NE Alberta, 1727 NW Hoyt, and more

A proposed development at 1727 NW Hoyt St, designed by Carleton Hart Architecture for Northwest Housing Alternatives, would include 149 units of affordable housing.

The Oregonian reported that the management group behind the Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring Major League Baseball to the city, have put in offers for two sites: the Portland Public Schools Blanchard Education Service Center near the Rose Quarter and the Esco Industrial site in Northwest Portland. The paper also reported that the group has spent $30,000 lobbying city hall to date. The Willamette Week reported that the offer to PPS would include giving the school district the former Banfield Pet Hospital Headquarters on 82nd Avenue.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about how the threat of a large apartment building at 1727 NW Hoyt St has led one neighbor to dig deep into history.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how an upzone at 126 NE Alberta St would turn a parking lot into 50 below-market-rate homes. An op-ed in the Oregonian described the proposal as the “21st-century version of red-lining“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on plans for to build the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter at the Broadway Bridge. The proposal is latest in a number of plans for the site*, which have included One Waterfront Place and the Broadway Bridge-Naito Parkway Apartments. In an article about the project the Portland Tribune revealed that plans for a shelter in an existing building at 320 NW Hoyt St have now been abandoned due to the high costs of converting the building to a new use.

OPB reported on Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative Inc’s plans to plans to bring African-American families back to North Portland.

The Portland Business Journal published a visual tour of CENTRL Office’s latest space in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Redfox Commons.  The project involves the conversion of the Old Freeman Factory in Northwest Portland into creative office space.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: OHSU KCRB, 2869 NE Sandy, 3031 SE Powell, and more

OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building

Construction is underway on the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building

The DJC wrote about Maxine Fitzpatrick, executive director of Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives, Inc, who hopes to build 1,000 affordable housing units over the course of 10 years*.

The Skanner News wrote about how displaced black residents will receive priority at PCRI’s Beatrice Morrow apartments.

The Hollywood Star News reported that demolition has begun on the existing structures that will be replaced by a 206-unit apartment building at 2869 NE Sandy Blvd.

The Business Tribune took a look at a day in the life of a carpenter working on the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building.

With another tenant signed at Pearl West, the building is nearing capacity, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The retailer that will replace AMF at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is Target, reported the Portland Mercury.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: 33 Affordable Housing Developments Planned for Portland (images)

St Francis Park Apartments

The St Francis Park Apartments, currently under construction in the Central Eastside.

Last December the Portland Housing Bureau delivered its second annual State of Housing Report to the City Council. The report noted the many challenges facing Portland, including that in 2016 “data indicates that housing affordability in Portland in the last year has gotten worse, an issue that is disproportionately impacting low-income residents, Communities of Color, seniors, and individuals with disabilities”. Nonetheless, the report also looked at what the Bureau is doing to address these issues, including: gaining voter-approval of a $258 million Affordable Housing Bond; passage of an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance; increasing urban renewal funding dedicated to affordable rental housing; and dedicating short-term rental revenue tax to affordable rental housing.

The report listed nearly 1,900 affordable housing units in the production pipeline, split between 33 developments. Next Portland is re-publishing the entire list, along with images and information about the architect / developer where we have it.

Some buildings on the list are exclusively reserved for lower income people, while others include a mix of market rate units and subsidized affordable units. Figures for levels of affordability, expressed as number of units reserved for individuals or families at a percentage of Area Median Income (AMI), are taken from the Housing Bureau Report. Buildings that include market units are only receiving city funding towards the affordable units. Note that this list does not contain any buildings which will be required to provide affordable housing as part of the newly passed Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance (which came into effect this month); any future projects funded through the voter approved affordable housing bond; any developments that are funded without the help of the Portland Housing Bureau; or any developments that have been allocated funding since the publication of the report late last year.

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Weekly Roundup: Retail and Affordable Housing on MLK, Cameron Apartments and more

NE MLK & Alberta

NE Alberta & MLK

On Wednesday the board of the Portland Development Commission voted in favor of selling land at NE MLK & Alberta to Majestic Realty Company. The developer intends to build a strip mall anchored by Natural Grocers on the site.

The City also announced its intention to move forward with an affordable housing development at 3368 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. According to a story in The Oregonian the site will be developed by Gerding Edlen and Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives Inc.

The DJC published photos of the under construction Cameron Apartmentspreviously known as the 12th & Clay apartments.

Construction is nearing an end at 3939 SW Viewpoint Terrace. The DJC published a photo gallery of the progress.

A four story, 30 unit building is set to replace an a fourplex apartment building at 3423 SE Hawthorne Blvd, reported The Chronicle. 15 members of the group ‘Stop Demolishing Portland‘ turned up on Saturday to protest the new building.