Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Block 76 West, ODOT Blocks, and more

Fremont Place

The revised design for the Fremont Place apartments will include a wider greenway trail and creative art studio spaces facing the river.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Block 76 West—the project formerly known as Sideyard—which is “being squeezed into hot spot“*.

In a 4-0 vote, the Portland City Council took a tentative vote to approve revised designs for the Fremont Place ApartmentsThe Pearl District Neighborhood Association had previously voted to drop their opposition to the project.

Longtime Central Eastside developer Beam has been picked to lead the redevelopment of the ODOT Blocks, reports the Oregonian.

According to the Oregonian Blue Star Donuts will open a “massive new downtown Portland flagship” in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Oregonian published images of what the MLB stadium proposed as part of the Portland Diamond Project could look like.

Foundation work is underway on 250 Taylor, which will be the new home for NW Natural. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress to date.

The Portland Tribune reported that ‘World-class’ Portland school rebuilds are still planned despite $100M funding gap.

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Weekly Roundup: Food Cart Block, Adidas Campus Expansion, Taylor Works, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion will include a building at N Delaware and N Sumner, and a relocated vehicular entry from N Greeley Ave

The Oregonian reported on plans to redevelop a site at 936 SW Washington Stcurrently home to Portland’s largest and best known food cart pod—with a 33-story tower, which would include office space, hotel rooms and apartments. The site is currently owned by the Goodman family, who the Daily Journal of Commerce reports have projects aplenty in progress.* Other current developments of theirs include 230 AshEleven West, and the Moxy Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal has the latest information on OMSI‘s ambitious Central Eastside expansion ambitions.

The Willamette Week covered the City’s annual State of Housing in Portland report, which includes some hope for struggling renters.

The Portland Business Journal reported that neighbors are opposing the Adidas Campus Expansion plans in North Portland. The Portland Design Commission has however shown early support for the proposal.

Portland Public Schools has “thrown a curveball” at the Portland Diamond Project‘s plans for an MLB stadium in the Rose Quarter, reports the Willamette Week. The Portland Business Journal reports that the group behind the project isn’t vexed by the proposed bidding process for the site.

The Urban Works Real Estate blog published construction updates on the Taylor Works Building at SE 2nd & Taylor, which is undergoing a major renovation and alteration.

The Business Tribune wrote about Continuum Partners, the developer that has been chosen to lead the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

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Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, 126 NE Alberta, 1727 NW Hoyt, and more

A proposed development at 1727 NW Hoyt St, designed by Carleton Hart Architecture for Northwest Housing Alternatives, would include 149 units of affordable housing.

The Oregonian reported that the management group behind the Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring Major League Baseball to the city, have put in offers for two sites: the Portland Public Schools Blanchard Education Service Center near the Rose Quarter and the Esco Industrial site in Northwest Portland. The paper also reported that the group has spent $30,000 lobbying city hall to date. The Willamette Week reported that the offer to PPS would include giving the school district the former Banfield Pet Hospital Headquarters on 82nd Avenue.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about how the threat of a large apartment building at 1727 NW Hoyt St has led one neighbor to dig deep into history.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how an upzone at 126 NE Alberta St would turn a parking lot into 50 below-market-rate homes. An op-ed in the Oregonian described the proposal as the “21st-century version of red-lining“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on plans for to build the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter at the Broadway Bridge. The proposal is latest in a number of plans for the site*, which have included One Waterfront Place and the Broadway Bridge-Naito Parkway Apartments. In an article about the project the Portland Tribune revealed that plans for a shelter in an existing building at 320 NW Hoyt St have now been abandoned due to the high costs of converting the building to a new use.

OPB reported on Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative Inc’s plans to plans to bring African-American families back to North Portland.

The Portland Business Journal published a visual tour of CENTRL Office’s latest space in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Redfox Commons.  The project involves the conversion of the Old Freeman Factory in Northwest Portland into creative office space.

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