Weekly Roundup: Flatiron, Meier & Frank, Riverplace, and more

Flatiron

Construction is underway on Works Progress Architecture’s Flatiron Building

The DJC published photos of Flatiron, the under construction office building at N Mississippi & Cook whose shape is “reminiscent of the iconic Flatiron Building in New York City“.

Portland Architecture wrote about two proposals for two developments with buildings far taller than currently allowed: Kengo Kuma’s Riverplace Redevelopment; and the William Kaven proposal for the Post Office Redevelopment.

The Oregonian reported that Oregon State University will occupy the second floor of the re-purposed Meier & Frank Building.

The Business Tribune reported that Portland-based ZGF Architects was named the #1 ranked firm for sustainability in the nation by Architect magazine.

Weekly Roundup: Blackburn Building, Post Office Towers, PCC Bond, and more

A proposal for the Post Office site in the Pearl could include up to 5 million square feet of development

Without waiting for an answer from Amazon, Portland moved forward with a Request for Qualifications aimed at developers interested in the Post Office Site. Shortly afterwards architecture firm William Kaven unveiled designs for two towers of up to 970′ on the Pearl District propertywhich would rise to a height over twice the 400′ limit recently approved by city council.

The DJC looked at the Albina Vision, a plan for the Rose Quarter which would see it become more than just an entertainment district.*

The Oregonian looked at the OMSI Masterplan, which could be Portland’s next big waterfront development. The paper also revealed that the James Beard Public Market is still looking at the possibility of locating on the site.

Voters approved a $185 million Portland Community College bond, which will be spent on a renovation of its workforce training facility in the Cully and an expansion of the health technology building at its Sylvania campus.

The DJC published construction photos of the Asian Health & Service Center, currently taking shape in Lents.

Central City Concern broke ground on the Blackburn Building, previously known as the Eastside Health Center, at 25 NE 122nd Ave. The building will include housing and medical services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

The Bureau of Development Services is building an $800,000 communications team, reports The Oregonian.

BikePortland reported that Portland Art Museum is getting ready to unveil new plans for the Rothko Pavilion, after facing opposition to an early iteration of the design.

Despite plans for NAYA Generations to provide a place for Native American seniors and foster families to live, the development doesn’t currently house a single foster family, reported the Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported on the high-end historic buildings that benefit from $8 million a year in tax breaks.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Jupiter Hotel Expansion, ROSE/APANO Mixed Use, Amazon HQ 2, and more

A ground breaking ceremony was held for SERA Architects’ ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development at SE 82nd & Division. The building will include 48 residential units and commercial space.

Eater Portland reported that Dig A Pony co-owners have announced a new bar inside the Jupiter Hotel Expansion.

The Oregonian looked at Portland’s proposal to Amazon for its second headquarters project. Sites identified as available for development include the Post Office Site and the Ankeny Blocks.

Taller buildings in downtown Portland were called “inevitable” in a KATU report.

The first tenants for the Field Office have been announced, reports The Oregonian. The Children’s Garden and marketing agency Adpearance will move into the development, currently under construction on NW Front Ave.

Weekly Roundup: 72Foster, USPS site, Hampton Inn, and more

Hampton Inn & Suites

The Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites, with 243 rooms, is now complete.

The DJC looked at how national brands adopt their brand standards to meet Portland’s design review guidelines,* with the Pearl District Hampton Inn as one example. The Business Tribune looked at how the newly opened hotel intends to serve tourists and business travelers alike.

City Observatory analyzed Portland’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance, which so far appears ‘to be creating incentives for developers to ‘go small’.”

According to the Portland Tribune the Post Office Site will be offered to Amazon as a potential location for its second headquarters.

The Business Tribune reported that REACH Community Development’s 72Foster affordable housing development has broken ground.

The DJC published photos of the completed PSU Karl Miller Center.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Parking Minimums, Post Office, ITAP, and more

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A little more than 3 years after the Portland City Council added minimum parking requirements for new apartment buildings, it has voted to remove them, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Post Office site in the Pearl has formally been handed over to the Portland Development Commission, writes the Business Tribune. Development on the site could begin in two years.

According to a report seen by the Oregonian, major problems with the Bureau of Development Services’ paperless permitting system ITAP were “enabled by ‘significant gaps’ in leadership.”

Walker Macy has presented the interim findings for the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Report, writes the Business Tribune.

The buyer of the Macy’s space at the Meier & Frank Building has confirmed their plans to the Portland Business Journal:  ground floor retail with creative office space above.

The DJC published photos of the completed Burnside Bridgehead building Slate.

Construction Dive wrote about The Amy, the 141 unit student-oriented affordable housing now under construction in SW Portland.

Weekly Roundup: 38 Davis, two buildings on NE Sandy, 121 SE 146th, and more

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

The 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave

Portland Shoupistas asked if it is time for Portland to eliminate minimum parking requirements, following recommendations from the White House on how to reduce barriers to housing development .

The DJC wrote about how Ankrom Moisan is rethinking the architecture office*, as they get ready to move into their new home at 38 Davis in Old Town.

The Business Tribune looked at Clay Creativethe new Central Eastside offices on the site of old Taylor Electric building that are now home to online bank Simple.

As Zidell Marine gets works on its last barge, Portland Architecture discussed Portland’s transforming waterfront and wondered if the “gold-hued gantry crane” could be retained as part of future development on the Zidell YardsBikePortland looked into whether the end of barge building could accelerate the schedule for completion of the South Waterfront Greenway path. The Oregonian discovered that “Portland housing officials learned this week how much it’ll cost to buy land from the Zidell family to build affordable housing“–but won’t say yet.

KOIN reported that after 53 years Der Rheinlander restaurant at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd will close in 2017. The property has been bought by developer Venerable Properties.

Directly across the street, at 5036 NE Sandy Blvd, a 6 story apartment building is planned on the site currently occupied by Taco Time, writes the Hollywood Star News.

At Portland Monthly Randy Gragg wrote that is “growing like never before”, and asked “what should we do next?

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 154 new affordable housing units planned at 121 SE 146th Ave by Home First Development.

A lengthy piece in the Willamette Week looked at affordable housing, and how “City officials have paid little attention to delivering the most housing for the money spent“.

With demolition underway at 1127 SW Morrison St ghost signs were revealed on an adjacent building, for the first time in 93 years. Restore Oregon tracked down newspaper ads for each of the businesses.

The Portland Business Journal showed images PSU students’ $1.3B idea for the Post Office Redevelopment .

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Jantzen Apartments, Zidell Marine, Eastside Health Center, and more

Eastside Health Center

The Eastside Health Center at 122nd and Burnside

After Portland-based ZGF Architects were named the nation’s top firm, Portland Architecture profiled the firm and looked at how it achieved the title.

Walls of the City looked at whether mid rise buildings can be family friendly.

With the Pearl District Post Office now in PDC ownership, Portland Monthly reported on the PSU students who are coming up with ideas for the future of the site.

After more than 50 years of building barges in South Waterfront, Zidell Marine is now building its last barge. The firm will now concentrated on the redevelopment of the Zidell Yards. Last year Design Advice was offered for office building on Zidell Blocks 4 and 6although neither building has moved forward since then.

The Business Tribune reported on the “lightened up” iteration of Modera Daviswhich was recently approved by the Design Commission.

OPB’s ‘State of Wonder’ covered the wood framed Albina Yardthe recently completed North Portland office building that is the first building to use domestically fabricated structural CLT panels.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the 6 Portland health organizations that have pledged $21.5M for low-income housing projects. The money will help fund three projects, in partnership with Central City Concern: the Eastside Health Center at  NE 122nd and Burnside; the Stark Street Apartments at 12647 S.E. Stark St; and the Interstate Apartments at 6905 N. Interstate Ave. The paper also provided renderings of the three projects.

The Business Tribune looked at the Jantzen Apartments, which recently went before the Design Commission for its first hearing.

The DJC published photos of the demolition of a single story building in downtown, which is set to be replaced by the new office building at 1127 SW Morrison St.

Weekly Roundup: Post Office Redevelopment, 419 SW Washington, NE 106th & Halsey and more

Broadway Corridor USPS

Conceptual image of the Post Office Redevelopment, from the 2015 Broadway Corridor Framework Plan

A 30-story tower by ZGF Architects is planned at 419 SW Washington St, according to The Oregonian. The existing building on the site was recently being used as a temporary homeless shelter, and is now vacant.

The first public hearing of the proposed draft of the Central City 2035 Plan was dominated by concerns about building heights in West End and Goose Hollow, according to an article in the DJC*. Meanwhile, Portland Shoupistas argued that proposed changes related to parking in the plan represent a step backwards.

The Oregonian wrote that up to 1,200 more apartments are proposed on the Prometheus Property in South Waterfront.

Kimberly Branam has been picked as the next executive director of the Portland Development Commission, according to The Oregonian. For the past five years Branam has been second-in-command to former executive director Patrick Quinton.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 54 organizations that are backing the proposed $258M affordable housing bond.

OPB’s “State of Wonder” discussed Yard, the recently completed Burnside Bridgehead tower that has sharply divided the opinions of Portlanders.

The Oregonian discovered the premium that will be paid by the PDC for a piece of land near the airport, necessary to allow the Post Office Redevelopment to move forward.

After 92 years, the Lotus Cardroom & Cafe will close later this month, according to KATU. The bar will be demolished to make way for the 3rd & Salmon hotel tower.

An affordable housing development at NE 106th & Halsey by Gerding Edlen and Human Solutions has nearby residents worried, according to the Mid-County Memo.

The timeframe for the City and ZRZ Realty to agree on the price of a piece of land at the Zidell Yards has been missed, according to The Oregonian.  Under a development agreement signed last year, the City has the option to buy the property at an agreed price, for the purpose of building affordable housing.

The Willamette Week wrote about 5 MLKthe Burnside Bridgehead high-rise that will replace the 95 year old Fishels Furniture building.

Work has begun on the Union at St Johns, according to the Portland Business Journal. The mixed use building will include 100 apartments as well as 20,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Inclusionary Zoning, Housing Affordability, Parking Minimums and more

The new location for the Post Office Processing & Distribution Center, formerly part of Colwood Golf Course. The site was rezoned to allow industrial uses in 2013

The new location for the Post Office Processing & Distribution Center, formerly part of Colwood Golf Course. The site was rezoned to allow industrial uses in 2013. (Image: Portland Development Commission).

The Oregonian reported on a measure intended to “cut red tape for affordable housing”. Under temporary rules going before the City Council this week buildings in the Central and Gateway plan districts, with at least 5 units of affordable housing, will no longer have go before the Design Commission. The projects will instead by reviewed through a Type IIx Design Review, where the initial decision is made by Bureau of Development Services staff. Unless extended, the new code will last until October 6th.

BikePortland wrote that as the repeal of Oregon’s ban on Inclusionary Zoning heads to Kate Brown’s desk, “the fight for affordable proximity moves to City Hall“. Representatives for Mayor Hales Commissioner Saltzman told BikePortland that proposals to implement Inclusionary Zoning in Portland are currently being worked on.

Portland Shoupistas argued that “minimum parking requirements can neutralize inclusionary zoning”. A proposal to add new minimum parking requirements in Northwest Portland is set to go before the Planning & Sustainability Commission on Tuesday.

As reported here on Tuesday, a building permit is currently under review for a project at 5816 SE Foster Rd. The Foster Powell blog asked “Could Multi-unit Housing on Foster Help Maintain Affordability?”

The Portland Mercury reported on a proposal to move the Kevin J. Duckworth Memorial Dock, currently located adjacent to the Eastbank Esplanade, to a new site on Swan Island adjacent to the new Daimler Trucks North America Headquarters.

The City will pay $34.7 million to acquire land near the airport, in order to allow the Post Office Redevelopment in the Pearl to move ahead, wrote The Oregonian. The price is substantially more than the fair market value, which PDC Director Quinton told the paper “is in the ‘$17 to $20 million range.'”

Weekly Roundup: Toyoko Inn, Post Office redevelopment, Legacy Central Lab and more

Toyoko Inn

SW 3rd & Oak, the planned location of a Toyoko Inn

The Oregonian reported that the board of the Portland Development Commission approved the terms of a Purchase and Sale Agreement for the United States Post Office site in the Pearl District. The City will pay $88 million to acquire the 13.4 acre site.

At the same meeting, the PDC board also approved the sale of a site at SW 3rd and Oak to Toyoko Inn. The Japanese hotelier plans to build a 300 to 400 room hotel on the site, which would be the company’s first West Coast location.

Demolition crews have begun work at the former home of the Oregon Ballet Theater. The building is demolished to make way for the Modera Belmont apartments.

Places over Time published their analysis of 2015 in Portland architecture and development.

The Portland Business Journal reported that despite an ongoing lawsuit, Metro still expects that the Convention Center Hotel will open in 2018.

Demolition is underway on the former Plaid Pantry and Sammy’s Flowers on NW 23rd and Glisan, according to the Portland Chronicle. The buildings will be replaced by a new Restoration HardwareRevised designs for the project will be presented to the Historic Landmarks Commission on January 25th.

Legacy Health held a grand opening for its new Legacy Central Lab building in the Lloyd District. The 62,000 sq ft building sits on a site previously used as a surface car park.

The Oregonian reported that builders are weighing lifting their opposition to overturning Oregon’s 17 year old ban on inclusionary zoning.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the Ballou & Wright building in the Pearl is set to undergo a $10 million makeover into creative office space. The historic structure was most recently used as Hanna Andersson’ headquarters. The children’s clothing retailer recently moved to a building in Kerns.

The Iron Fireman building at 4784 SE 17th will be converted into creative office space, according to the Portland Journal. The 115,000 sq ft was most recently home to aircraft parts manufacturer PECO Manufacturing, who have moved to a site in Clackamas County.