Weekly Roundup: Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building, Live Nation South Waterfront, The Canyons, and more

The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will be located across the street from the existing building, and include a skybridge over SW 6th Ave.

A resident-run retirement community is planning a $100 million expansion, reports the Oregonian. The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will rise to 10 stories and include 127 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

Live Nation is in talks with the Zidell family to build a 10,000-seat performance venue in South Waterfront, according to the Oregonian.

Turner Construction is rushing to complete work* on the Providence Park Expansion in time for the Portland Timbers’ home opener on June 1, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Prosper Portland has selected the “Play” concept for the Broadway Corridor, writes the Oregonian. The concept would see the former post office “replaced with sports fields and basketball courts flanked by high-rises.”

A proposed bill in the Oregon legislature aims to create more lower priced condominium units. Developments that go through a more stringent envelope inspection would see the period for lawsuits reduced from 10 years to six, and require approval from a majority of homeowners to initiate a lawsuit.

The 101 affordable apartments at 72 Foster are now complete. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the development, which has an “intergenerational focus.”

The Business Tribune wrote about how at The Canyons developer Ben Kaiser is creating a “community with no limits on age or accessibility.”

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Metro Reports: Marquam Hill Apartments, Broadway Corridor, Hyatt Place, and more

Marquam Hill Apartments
The Marquam Hill Apartments by Steelhead Architecture will include 72 units split between three buildings.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers April 8th to April 14th, 2019.

Design Advice has been requested for the Broadway Corridor Masterplan at the former post office site in the Pearl:

Place holder DA request. Applicant is hoping for June 6th and again on July 11th. Note Pre-app EA 19-147103.

Early Assistance has been requested by Ankrom Moisan Architects for the Division Street Apartments at 11332 SE Division St:

60 units of low-barrier permanent supporting housing. They will eventually need/want the info related to the RM2 zoning (through the Better Housing by Design).

The Hyatt Place at 350 NW 12th Ave has been submitted for a Type III Design Review by Otak Architects:

Development of a 23-story building. 11 stories will be used for a new Hyatt Place brand hotel (170 rooms). 12 stories will be used for a new residential apartment community (110 one-bedroom and studio units).

A project at 6716 NE Garfield Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Ink:Built Architecture:

New 3-story, 28-unit modular apartment building with trash enclosure and associated site work.

The Marquam Hill Apartments at 3140 SW 12th Ave have been submitted for building permit review by Steelhead Architecture:

1 of 3 new 5 story 40 units multifamily building on consolidated tax lots and associated siteworks includes trash enclosure and parking. Ground floor includes parking, stair and lobby.

2 of 3 new 5 story 24 units multifamily building on consolidated tax lots and associated siteworks includes trash enclosure and parking. Ground floor includes parking, stair and lobby.

3 of 3 new 3 story 8 units multifamily building on consolidated tax lots and associated siteworks includes parking.

A project at 7206 N St Louis Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

Construction of new 6-unit apartment building with fire sprinkler room; 40 sq ft trash enclosure and associated sitework. Existing house to remain. Mechanical permit to be separate.

A building permit was issued to Urban Development Group for a project at 425 NE Bryant St (previously 7000 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd):

New 3-story, 12-unit apartment building with no on-site parking

A building permit was issued to Wright Architecture for a project at 435 NE Church St:

New 3 story apartment building with 19 units and associated site work. No off street parking.

A building permit was issued for a project at 1505 N Humboldt St (previously 4905 N Interstate Ave):

New 3-story, 12-unit apartment with trash and riser rooms. ***Fire sprinkler systems, fire alarm, mechanical, plumbing, electrical separate permits***

Focus: The 25 Most Popular Posts of 2018

Block 216

The 35-story Block 216 tower was approved in December. Our post about the project’s Design Advice Request was our most popular post of the year.

Happy New Year.

2018 is the fourth full year Next Portland has been in operation and I’m excited to see what 2019 brings. I’m currently on vacation in Scotland, so new posts will continue to be sporadic until I return next week.

Last year was another busy year for the site. Of the course of the year 141 new posts were published, with nearly 900,000 page views.

The year started with the last of the pre-inclusionary zoning (IZ) projects working their way through the design review process. In February it was reported by the Portland Mercury that Portland’s inclusionary zoning mandate was getting lackluster results, with only 12 qualifying building in the pipeline.

By the end of the year Next Portland had posted about a number of large post-IZ developments that have been approved through design review. These include 815 W Burnside, 1715 SW Salmon, Nomad, the ART Tower Block 216, 1935 N Killingsworth and the Pepsi Blocks. The Portland Housing Bureau now estimates that there are 43 projects subject to inclusionary zoning in the pipeline, with 362 affordable units in projects that have permits or are close to permitting.

Despite the uptick in post-IZ proposals, new design review and building permit applications remain down relative to years ago. At the end of the year the Bureau of Development Services was forced to lay off staff for the first time since the recession, citing “quite sobering” forecasts.

Similarly to 2017, many of the most popular posts were published in previous years, a reflection of the fact that the content Next Portland remains relevant for a long time, as buildings move through construction and into occupancy. One post in the top 25 most popular posts was from 2015; seven posts were from 2016; six posts were from 2017; and eleven were published in 2018.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

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Weekly Roundup: Broadway Corridor, Beatrice Morrow, NW 18th & Hoyt, and more

“Play” is one of three concepts being explored for the Broadway Corridor. In this concept the North Park Blocks are extended to Johnson, with a flexible open space that can be used for sports and community gatherings.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that Portland officials are in the early stages of trying to recruit an anchor tenant* for the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

The Business Tribune wrote about the Beatrice Morrow, an 80 unit affordable housing development by Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives (PCRI). Over time the goal is for “75 percent of the families that rent units in the building to move on to home ownership with the help of PCRI”.

Japanese retailer Muji has now opened in the Meier & Frank Building. The Business Tribune wrote about the Japanese retailer is “adding a next chapter to the story of retail in Portland“. Eater Portland reported that “beloved” Ladd’s Addition coffee shop Upper Left Roasters will also open in the building.

The Northwest District Association has appealed the approval of the affordable housing at NW 18th and Hoyt because they think it’s “ugly”, reports the Portland Mercury. The City Council will consider the appeal on Thursday.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Lincoln High School, Oregon Harbor of Hope, Broadway Corridor, and more

Lincoln High School

The new Lincoln High School will be built at the west side of the campus, allowing the existing school to remain open during construction. The new school is being designed by Bora Architects.

The Lincoln High School Rebuild went in front of the Design Commission for the first time. The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the reception it received.*

Eater Portland reported that Bamboo Sushi offshoot QuickFish will open its third location in Heartline on August 15th.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter and navigation center is half a million dollars over budget, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland Housing Bureau is teaming with three other public agencies to provide more than $12 million for projects that combine housing and mental health services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

A group called the Healthy Communities Coalition is pushing for a massive number of affordable units at the Broadway Corridor, according to the Willamette Week.

Cafe Hey Love Superette has opened in the lobby of Jupiter NEXT Hotelwith coffee, pastries and CBD lattes, writes Eater Portland.

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Weekly Roundup: 6036 SE Foster, 3rd & Salmon, Canopy by Hilton, and more

The redevelopment of the YMCA on Foster is being designed by Leeb Architects.

We’re back after taking a summer vacation. This roundup covers development news from the last two weeks.

The Oregonian reported that millions in infrastructure costs sank the Zidell Yards development in South Waterfront.

With the main post office in the Pearl now closed, BikePortland reported that the risk to cyclists from right-hook collisions has dropped. The site is set to redeveloped as part of the Broadway Corridor Plan.

The Oregonian took a first look at the newly completed Canopy by Hilton hotel in Pearl District.

Demolition has begun on the former Lotus Cardroom and Cafe, according to the Oregonian. The building is being torn down to make way for the 20-story 3rd and Salmon hotel tower.

The NW Examiner looked into what might happen with ESCO site on NW Vaughn.

City Observatory praised the Portland City Council for reversing its early denial of the Fremont Place Apartments, but noted that the City Council did not approve a zone change for a site at 126 NE Alberta St that would have allowed the construction of 50 below-market, affordable apartments adjacent to the Alberta Abbey.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the redevelopment of the YMCA at 6036 SE Foster Rd, which will combine a full-service daycare facility with 48 new apartments*.

Portland Architecture wrote about Heartlinethe Pearl district development that presents an alternative to the podium typology.

The latest potential buyer for Centennial Mills has plans for plans for condos, a park and affordable housing, according to the Portland Tribune.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Food Cart Block, Adidas Campus Expansion, Taylor Works, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion will include a building at N Delaware and N Sumner, and a relocated vehicular entry from N Greeley Ave

The Oregonian reported on plans to redevelop a site at 936 SW Washington Stcurrently home to Portland’s largest and best known food cart pod—with a 33-story tower, which would include office space, hotel rooms and apartments. The site is currently owned by the Goodman family, who the Daily Journal of Commerce reports have projects aplenty in progress.* Other current developments of theirs include 230 AshEleven West, and the Moxy Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal has the latest information on OMSI‘s ambitious Central Eastside expansion ambitions.

The Willamette Week covered the City’s annual State of Housing in Portland report, which includes some hope for struggling renters.

The Portland Business Journal reported that neighbors are opposing the Adidas Campus Expansion plans in North Portland. The Portland Design Commission has however shown early support for the proposal.

Portland Public Schools has “thrown a curveball” at the Portland Diamond Project‘s plans for an MLB stadium in the Rose Quarter, reports the Willamette Week. The Portland Business Journal reports that the group behind the project isn’t vexed by the proposed bidding process for the site.

The Urban Works Real Estate blog published construction updates on the Taylor Works Building at SE 2nd & Taylor, which is undergoing a major renovation and alteration.

The Business Tribune wrote about Continuum Partners, the developer that has been chosen to lead the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Adidas Campus Expansion, Old Town heights, and more

Old Town Chinatown Block 33

An earlier scheme for the redevelopment of Old Town Chinatown Block 33 was presented to the Landmarks Commission in January 2017. The same architecture and development team are now working on a revised proposal that would orient the mass on the western half of the block, where they are seeking an increase in allowable height.

The Oregonian reported that the Adidas Campus Expansion will more than double the size of the company’s North American headquarters.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the public forum where the three developers* who are vying for the Broadway Corridor Development Opportunity introduced themselves. The Related Companies, Continuum Partners and McWhinney are competing to be chosen as the master developer for the 32-acre site.

Portland City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly reversed her vote on height increases at the waterfront. The change will allow the Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward.

The Oregonian wrote about the debate at City Council over whether heights should be increased on Old Town Chinatown Block 33

City Observatory published an open letter on housing affordability to Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, written by Portland State University Emeritus Professor Ethan Seltzer. An editorial in the Oregonian argued that the Portland City Council needs to reset its compass.

The Oregonian reported on high-rise apartment units rented as hotel rooms, including at The NV, Block 17 and Park Avenue West.

Portland Architecture interviewed GBD Architects’ Kyle Andersen & Phil Beyl about the firm’s 50 LEED projects (and counting).

A guest editorial in the Oregonian, written by Mark Edlen and Denis Hayes, argued that wood skyscrapers are coming and should be built with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.

The Skanner News broke the news that the Meyer Memorial Trust, the state’s second largest foundation, plans to build a new headquarters at N Vancouver and Tillamook.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a tax break for the developments that voluntarily choose to include affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.