Weekly Roundup: 6036 SE Foster, 3rd & Salmon, Canopy by Hilton, and more

The redevelopment of the YMCA on Foster is being designed by Leeb Architects.

We’re back after taking a summer vacation. This roundup covers development news from the last two weeks.

The Oregonian reported that millions in infrastructure costs sank the Zidell Yards development in South Waterfront.

With the main post office in the Pearl now closed, BikePortland reported that the risk to cyclists from right-hook collisions has dropped. The site is set to redeveloped as part of the Broadway Corridor Plan.

The Oregonian took a first look at the newly completed Canopy by Hilton hotel in Pearl District.

Demolition has begun on the former Lotus Cardroom and Cafe, according to the Oregonian. The building is being torn down to make way for the 20-story 3rd and Salmon hotel tower.

The NW Examiner looked into what might happen with ESCO site on NW Vaughn.

City Observatory praised the Portland City Council for reversing its early denial of the Fremont Place Apartments, but noted that the City Council did not approve a zone change for a site at 126 NE Alberta St that would have allowed the construction of 50 below-market, affordable apartments adjacent to the Alberta Abbey.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the redevelopment of the YMCA at 6036 SE Foster Rd, which will combine a full-service daycare facility with 48 new apartments*.

Portland Architecture wrote about Heartlinethe Pearl district development that presents an alternative to the podium typology.

The latest potential buyer for Centennial Mills has plans for plans for condos, a park and affordable housing, according to the Portland Tribune.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Food Cart Block, Adidas Campus Expansion, Taylor Works, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion will include a building at N Delaware and N Sumner, and a relocated vehicular entry from N Greeley Ave

The Oregonian reported on plans to redevelop a site at 936 SW Washington Stcurrently home to Portland’s largest and best known food cart pod—with a 33-story tower, which would include office space, hotel rooms and apartments. The site is currently owned by the Goodman family, who the Daily Journal of Commerce reports have projects aplenty in progress.* Other current developments of theirs include 230 AshEleven West, and the Moxy Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal has the latest information on OMSI‘s ambitious Central Eastside expansion ambitions.

The Willamette Week covered the City’s annual State of Housing in Portland report, which includes some hope for struggling renters.

The Portland Business Journal reported that neighbors are opposing the Adidas Campus Expansion plans in North Portland. The Portland Design Commission has however shown early support for the proposal.

Portland Public Schools has “thrown a curveball” at the Portland Diamond Project‘s plans for an MLB stadium in the Rose Quarter, reports the Willamette Week. The Portland Business Journal reports that the group behind the project isn’t vexed by the proposed bidding process for the site.

The Urban Works Real Estate blog published construction updates on the Taylor Works Building at SE 2nd & Taylor, which is undergoing a major renovation and alteration.

The Business Tribune wrote about Continuum Partners, the developer that has been chosen to lead the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

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Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

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Weekly Roundup: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Adidas Campus Expansion, Old Town heights, and more

Old Town Chinatown Block 33

An earlier scheme for the redevelopment of Old Town Chinatown Block 33 was presented to the Landmarks Commission in January 2017. The same architecture and development team are now working on a revised proposal that would orient the mass on the western half of the block, where they are seeking an increase in allowable height.

The Oregonian reported that the Adidas Campus Expansion will more than double the size of the company’s North American headquarters.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the public forum where the three developers* who are vying for the Broadway Corridor Development Opportunity introduced themselves. The Related Companies, Continuum Partners and McWhinney are competing to be chosen as the master developer for the 32-acre site.

Portland City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly reversed her vote on height increases at the waterfront. The change will allow the Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward.

The Oregonian wrote about the debate at City Council over whether heights should be increased on Old Town Chinatown Block 33

City Observatory published an open letter on housing affordability to Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, written by Portland State University Emeritus Professor Ethan Seltzer. An editorial in the Oregonian argued that the Portland City Council needs to reset its compass.

The Oregonian reported on high-rise apartment units rented as hotel rooms, including at The NV, Block 17 and Park Avenue West.

Portland Architecture interviewed GBD Architects’ Kyle Andersen & Phil Beyl about the firm’s 50 LEED projects (and counting).

A guest editorial in the Oregonian, written by Mark Edlen and Denis Hayes, argued that wood skyscrapers are coming and should be built with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.

The Skanner News broke the news that the Meyer Memorial Trust, the state’s second largest foundation, plans to build a new headquarters at N Vancouver and Tillamook.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a tax break for the developments that voluntarily choose to include affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Riverplace, Broadway Corridor, and more

Fremont Place Apartments

The City Council voted down the Fremont Place Apartments over concerns about the width of the Greenway trail

The Portland City Council voted 5-0 to overturn the Design Commission’s approval of the Fremont Place Apartmentsthe Pearl District apartment building opposed by neighbors. Portland for Everyone asked if it this would create an open season for NIMBY lawsuitsCity Observatory argued that Portland doesn’t really want to make housing affordable.

Later that day council voted down a series of zoning amendments that would be necessary for the Kengo Kuma-designed Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward

The Portland Tribune noted that the series of denials added up to the rejection of nearly 3,000 new homes.

The Willamette Week reported that three developers made the shortlist for the redevelopment of the post office site in the Pearl District, known as the Broadway Corridor.

Archinect wrote about the dismantling of the “iconic Portland Building‘s postmodern, multicolored facade”.

BikePortland reported on how the University of Portland’s Franz Campus has puts greenway advocates on edge.

Weekly Roundup: Flatiron, Meier & Frank, Riverplace, and more

Flatiron

Construction is underway on Works Progress Architecture’s Flatiron Building

The DJC published photos of Flatiron, the under construction office building at N Mississippi & Cook whose shape is “reminiscent of the iconic Flatiron Building in New York City“.

Portland Architecture wrote about two proposals for two developments with buildings far taller than currently allowed: Kengo Kuma’s Riverplace Redevelopment; and the William Kaven proposal for the Post Office Redevelopment.

The Oregonian reported that Oregon State University will occupy the second floor of the re-purposed Meier & Frank Building.

The Business Tribune reported that Portland-based ZGF Architects was named the #1 ranked firm for sustainability in the nation by Architect magazine.

Weekly Roundup: Blackburn Building, Post Office Towers, PCC Bond, and more

A proposal for the Post Office site in the Pearl could include up to 5 million square feet of development

Without waiting for an answer from Amazon, Portland moved forward with a Request for Qualifications aimed at developers interested in the Post Office Site. Shortly afterwards architecture firm William Kaven unveiled designs for two towers of up to 970′ on the Pearl District propertywhich would rise to a height over twice the 400′ limit recently approved by city council.

The DJC looked at the Albina Vision, a plan for the Rose Quarter which would see it become more than just an entertainment district.*

The Oregonian looked at the OMSI Masterplan, which could be Portland’s next big waterfront development. The paper also revealed that the James Beard Public Market is still looking at the possibility of locating on the site.

Voters approved a $185 million Portland Community College bond, which will be spent on a renovation of its workforce training facility in the Cully and an expansion of the health technology building at its Sylvania campus.

The DJC published construction photos of the Asian Health & Service Center, currently taking shape in Lents.

Central City Concern broke ground on the Blackburn Building, previously known as the Eastside Health Center, at 25 NE 122nd Ave. The building will include housing and medical services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

The Bureau of Development Services is building an $800,000 communications team, reports The Oregonian.

BikePortland reported that Portland Art Museum is getting ready to unveil new plans for the Rothko Pavilion, after facing opposition to an early iteration of the design.

Despite plans for NAYA Generations to provide a place for Native American seniors and foster families to live, the development doesn’t currently house a single foster family, reported the Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported on the high-end historic buildings that benefit from $8 million a year in tax breaks.

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Weekly Roundup: Jupiter Hotel Expansion, ROSE/APANO Mixed Use, Amazon HQ 2, and more

A ground breaking ceremony was held for SERA Architects’ ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development at SE 82nd & Division. The building will include 48 residential units and commercial space.

Eater Portland reported that Dig A Pony co-owners have announced a new bar inside the Jupiter Hotel Expansion.

The Oregonian looked at Portland’s proposal to Amazon for its second headquarters project. Sites identified as available for development include the Post Office Site and the Ankeny Blocks.

Taller buildings in downtown Portland were called “inevitable” in a KATU report.

The first tenants for the Field Office have been announced, reports The Oregonian. The Children’s Garden and marketing agency Adpearance will move into the development, currently under construction on NW Front Ave.

Weekly Roundup: 72Foster, USPS site, Hampton Inn, and more

Hampton Inn & Suites

The Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites, with 243 rooms, is now complete.

The DJC looked at how national brands adopt their brand standards to meet Portland’s design review guidelines,* with the Pearl District Hampton Inn as one example. The Business Tribune looked at how the newly opened hotel intends to serve tourists and business travelers alike.

City Observatory analyzed Portland’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance, which so far appears ‘to be creating incentives for developers to ‘go small’.”

According to the Portland Tribune the Post Office Site will be offered to Amazon as a potential location for its second headquarters.

The Business Tribune reported that REACH Community Development’s 72Foster affordable housing development has broken ground.

The DJC published photos of the completed PSU Karl Miller Center.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.