Weekly Roundup: Adidas Campus Expansion, 1727 NW Hoyt, Restoration Hardware, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion is being designed by LEVER Architecture

Three new buildings are planned* as part of the Adidas Campus Expansion, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

In a two-part series, the Portland Tribune analyzed why new apartments so expensive and offered 9 ways to make apartments cheaper.

The Portland Tribune reported that polling for Metro shows that voters might support a $1 billion regional affordable housing bond.

The Oregonian wrote about wrote about the member of Portland’s Historic Landmarks Commission who is weighing in on a proposal at 1727 NW Hoyt Stdirectly across from her own house.

The Portland Business Journal published photos of the “posh new furnishings and design gallery” opened by Restoration Hardware on NW 23rd Ave.

The Business Tribune reported on the history of various development proposals for Old Town Chinatown Block 33.

Portland for Everyone argued that the Riverplace Redevelopment was saved by the city’s affordability mandate.

OPB reported on the future of the Artists Repertory Theatre, which will include selling half their site at 1515 SW Morrison St for new housing.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Adidas Campus Expansion, Old Town heights, and more

Old Town Chinatown Block 33

An earlier scheme for the redevelopment of Old Town Chinatown Block 33 was presented to the Landmarks Commission in January 2017. The same architecture and development team are now working on a revised proposal that would orient the mass on the western half of the block, where they are seeking an increase in allowable height.

The Oregonian reported that the Adidas Campus Expansion will more than double the size of the company’s North American headquarters.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the public forum where the three developers* who are vying for the Broadway Corridor Development Opportunity introduced themselves. The Related Companies, Continuum Partners and McWhinney are competing to be chosen as the master developer for the 32-acre site.

Portland City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly reversed her vote on height increases at the waterfront. The change will allow the Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward.

The Oregonian wrote about the debate at City Council over whether heights should be increased on Old Town Chinatown Block 33

City Observatory published an open letter on housing affordability to Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, written by Portland State University Emeritus Professor Ethan Seltzer. An editorial in the Oregonian argued that the Portland City Council needs to reset its compass.

The Oregonian reported on high-rise apartment units rented as hotel rooms, including at The NV, Block 17 and Park Avenue West.

Portland Architecture interviewed GBD Architects’ Kyle Andersen & Phil Beyl about the firm’s 50 LEED projects (and counting).

A guest editorial in the Oregonian, written by Mark Edlen and Denis Hayes, argued that wood skyscrapers are coming and should be built with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.

The Skanner News broke the news that the Meyer Memorial Trust, the state’s second largest foundation, plans to build a new headquarters at N Vancouver and Tillamook.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a tax break for the developments that voluntarily choose to include affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Riverplace, Broadway Corridor, and more

Fremont Place Apartments

The City Council voted down the Fremont Place Apartments over concerns about the width of the Greenway trail

The Portland City Council voted 5-0 to overturn the Design Commission’s approval of the Fremont Place Apartmentsthe Pearl District apartment building opposed by neighbors. Portland for Everyone asked if it this would create an open season for NIMBY lawsuitsCity Observatory argued that Portland doesn’t really want to make housing affordable.

Later that day council voted down a series of zoning amendments that would be necessary for the Kengo Kuma-designed Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward

The Portland Tribune noted that the series of denials added up to the rejection of nearly 3,000 new homes.

The Willamette Week reported that three developers made the shortlist for the redevelopment of the post office site in the Pearl District, known as the Broadway Corridor.

Archinect wrote about the dismantling of the “iconic Portland Building‘s postmodern, multicolored facade”.

BikePortland reported on how the University of Portland’s Franz Campus has puts greenway advocates on edge.

Weekly Roundup: New Omni, Portland Boathouse, Overlook apartments, and more

New Omni

New Omni went in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission in December, where it was met by stiff opposition. Should the project move forward it could be the first Central City development go ahead under the city’s Inclusionary Zoning ordinance.

The Willamette Week wrote about opposition to new high rises, including the Riverplace Redevelopment, Fremont Place, New Omni and original proposal for Grand Belmont—much of which is coming from residents of nearby high rises.

The Oregonian looked at areas where height could be restricted as part of the Central City 2035 plan. Portland Architecture asked if the view corridor debate is civic activism or NIMBYism?

After 43 years, regulars said farewell to the Overlook Restaurant. The diner is being replaced by the Overlook apartments at 1332 N Skidmore St.

The Portland Tribune wrote about plans for the Portland River Center, which would replace the existing boathouse and add an interpretive center with educational and meeting spaces.

The Portland Mercury wrote about how the Oregon Constitution limits opportunities to leverage the $258 million housing bond passed by voters in 2016.

Weekly Roundup: Flatiron, Meier & Frank, Riverplace, and more

Flatiron

Construction is underway on Works Progress Architecture’s Flatiron Building

The DJC published photos of Flatiron, the under construction office building at N Mississippi & Cook whose shape is “reminiscent of the iconic Flatiron Building in New York City“.

Portland Architecture wrote about two proposals for two developments with buildings far taller than currently allowed: Kengo Kuma’s Riverplace Redevelopment; and the William Kaven proposal for the Post Office Redevelopment.

The Oregonian reported that Oregon State University will occupy the second floor of the re-purposed Meier & Frank Building.

The Business Tribune reported that Portland-based ZGF Architects was named the #1 ranked firm for sustainability in the nation by Architect magazine.

Weekly Roundup: Riverplace Redevelopment, Cook Security Group HQ, 7 Dees, and more

Riverplace Redevelopment

The Riverplace Redevelopment would include towers of up to 400′ tall.

The Willamette Week broke the news of the potential Riverplace Redevelopment, which could include 2,500 units, with 500 of them priced to be affordable for people making 80% of area median income. The project is being designed by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma & Associates and Portland-based GBD Architects. To move forward the project will require the support of the Portland City Council for an increase in the allowable heights on the site. Mayor Wheeler has confirmed he supports the development.

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the Cook Security Group HQ at 9225 NE Cascades Parkway.

The NW Examiner wrote about the Fremont Place apartment development, and how it will affect views of the Fremont Bridge from the Fields Park.

The 7 Dees garden center at 6025 SE Powell is set to be redeveloped as a 3-story self-storage building, reports the Portland Tribune.

Portland Architecture spoke to Hennebery Eddy Architects founder Tim Eddy on the occasion of the firm’s 25th birthday.

In the past 10 years, the City of Portland has collected $390 million in Systems Development Charges paid by developers, writes the Business Tribune.