Weekly Roundup: 1177 NE 21st, Block 45, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The under construction building at 1177 NE 21st Ave was designed by Hacker architects for PHK Development

OPB reporting on how Portland Art Museum is adapting plans for the Rothko Pavilion in order to win over critics.

According to the Oregonian the bidder that intended to purchase an Alaska ferry for use as a floating hotel at 2260 NW Front Ave has backed out of the deal.

The Willamette Week reported that Lents will get a new craft beer bar with food carts, in a currently under construction development at 9316 SE Woodstock Blvd.

The Hollywood Star News reported on the construction of a seven-story, 162-unit condominium project at 1177 NE 21st Ave.

The DJC published photos of the self storage building rising at 910 SE 7th Ave.

Prosper Portland, the agency formerly known as the Portland Development Commission, struggles to make money from the property it owns, writes the Oregonian.

Portlanders for Parking Reform wrote about how a project at 1717 SE Tenino St will include less affordable housing but more parking spaces, as a result of city regulations.

The NW Examiner looked at conflicting opinions of Pearl District residents regarding views of the Fremont Bridge that would be blocked by the Fremont Place apartment tower, which is currently going through design review.

The Portland City Council approved financing and transfer of the land for Block 45With all 240 units now planned to be affordable, the building will be city’s largest single building affordable housing development in 50 years.

The Portland Mercury reported on how the Republican tax plan would eliminate eliminate private activity bonds, a tool commonly used to fund affordable housing projects across the country.

The Willamette Week looked at a potential conflict between two of Governor Brown’s priorities, timber towers and clean air.

Weekly Roundup: Blackburn Building, Post Office Towers, PCC Bond, and more

A proposal for the Post Office site in the Pearl could include up to 5 million square feet of development

Without waiting for an answer from Amazon, Portland moved forward with a Request for Qualifications aimed at developers interested in the Post Office Site. Shortly afterwards architecture firm William Kaven unveiled designs for two towers of up to 970′ on the Pearl District propertywhich would rise to a height over twice the 400′ limit recently approved by city council.

The DJC looked at the Albina Vision, a plan for the Rose Quarter which would see it become more than just an entertainment district.*

The Oregonian looked at the OMSI Masterplan, which could be Portland’s next big waterfront development. The paper also revealed that the James Beard Public Market is still looking at the possibility of locating on the site.

Voters approved a $185 million Portland Community College bond, which will be spent on a renovation of its workforce training facility in the Cully and an expansion of the health technology building at its Sylvania campus.

The DJC published construction photos of the Asian Health & Service Center, currently taking shape in Lents.

Central City Concern broke ground on the Blackburn Building, previously known as the Eastside Health Center, at 25 NE 122nd Ave. The building will include housing and medical services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

The Bureau of Development Services is building an $800,000 communications team, reports The Oregonian.

BikePortland reported that Portland Art Museum is getting ready to unveil new plans for the Rothko Pavilion, after facing opposition to an early iteration of the design.

Despite plans for NAYA Generations to provide a place for Native American seniors and foster families to live, the development doesn’t currently house a single foster family, reported the Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported on the high-end historic buildings that benefit from $8 million a year in tax breaks.

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Weekly Roundup: ArLo Apartments, Franklin High School, 539 SW 10th, and more

ArLo Apartments

The ArLo Apartments by Fairfield Residential will be built on the site formerly home to Interstate Lanes, which closed last year.

The Willamette Week reported on a proposal for a hotel at 539 SW 10th Avea site currently currently occupied by food carts, including the original Nong’s Khao Man Gai.

OPB reported that Portland Public Schools gave a preview look at the remodeled Franklin High School.

The Business Tribune wrote about changes coming to Portland’s Design Review process, following City Council adoption of the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project Report.

Portland Art Museum has raised a $27 million for the Rothko Pavilion, according to the Willamette Week, despite the fact that it currently lacks the legal right to build the project.

House Bill 2007, which is intended to speed up the approval process for affordable housing, is running into neighborhood opposition, writes the Portland Tribune.

The DJC wrote about the growing pains of the North Pearl*.

As Portland grows bowling alleys are being squeezed out, reports OPB. The former Interstate Lanes are being redeveloped as the ArLo Apartments, while the AMF alley at 3031 SE Powell is set to be converted to a Target.

Portland Shoupistas wrote that Mayor Wheeler has said that the debate between parking and housing “is over“.

Lastly, Next Portland is a finalist for “Best Local Blog” in the Willamette Week’s Best of Portland Readers’ Poll.” If you enjoy our coverage of local architecture and development we’d appreciate your vote.

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Weekly Roundup: Providence Park, Karl Miller Center, Madison High School, and more

The proposed 4,000 seat expansion of Providence Park

The Portland Timbers released images of the Providence Park Expansion , which the Portland Mercury noted is “influenced by the iconic near-vertical stands at La Bombonera in Buenos Aires and the Shakespearean Globe Theater in London.”

The Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s 2017 State of the City Design Report.

The Oregonian wrote about how Oregon is pushing for wooden skyscrapers, including Carbon12 and Framework, to revive the state’s timber industry.

As the Portland City Council approved tax breaks for seven new buildings, in exchange for affordable housing, The Oregonian reported that Commissioner Nick Fish questioned whether the proposals go far enough. The exemptions were granted for Con-way Block 290, 2216 NW Pettygrove St, SW Park and Columbia, SW 3rd & Ash, The Atomic Orchard Lofts at 2520 NE Sandy Blvd, Old Town Chinatown Block 33, and Woody Guthrie Place at 5728 SE 91st Ave.

BikePortland reported that amid stiff opposition, the city council ordinance required for the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion was placed on hold.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how PSU is on the final stretch of work on the Karl Miller Centerthe expansion of renovation of the university’s School of Business Administration.

The Portland Tribune reported on an error by Portland Public Schools that resulted in the award of a design contract for the Madison High School Modernization to a firm that scored lower in the evaluation process.

Weekly Roundup: 1645 SE Nehalem, Tesla Showroom, Rothko Pavilion, and more

Construction of the Rothko Pavilion as currently proposed would require City Council permission to alter an existing pedestrian easement.

In “So many projects, too little time”, the DJC looked at the speed of Portland’s Design Review process*.

BikePortland took a look at the newly built trail adjacent to the planned Tesla Showroom at 4330 SW Macadam Ave.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the four-story self-storage building that’s coming to a site at 627 SE Division Place.

BikePortland reported that the city’s bicycle and pedestrian advisory committees have expressed opposition to the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion.

The DJC published photos of the expanded Japanese Garden.

Portland Shoupistas reported that proposed changes to buildings planned at 1717 SE Tenino5965 SE Milwaukie and 1645 SE Nehalem—which would see 46 parking stalls removed from plans in favor of the addition of 40 affordable units—may not happen, due to the Bureau of Development Services’ interpretation of what counts as “frequent service” transit.

The Oregonian looked at whether Portland can build its way out of a housing crunch.

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Weekly Roundup: Japanese Garden, PDX Commons, Viking Pavilion, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Cultural Crossing at the Japanese Garden opened this past weekend.

Portland Architecture wrote about the wonder of Kengo Kuma’s Cultural Crossing at the Portland Japanese Garden.

The Business Tribune reported on the retirees developing the PDX Commons, four-story co-housing condominium on SE Belmont St.

The Rothko Pavilion at the Portland Art Museum would prohibit biking, limit walking access near South Park Blocks, according to BikePortland.

The DJC looked at how PSU is looking to score big* with the Viking Pavilion.

The NW Examiner broke the news that a proposal for music venue at 2034 NW 27th Ave, which would have had a capacity of up to 3,000, has been withdrawn.

Oregon Business reported on how more manufacturers are needed to jumpstart mass timber industry.

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis argued that the housing recovery is still incomplete.

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Weekly Roundup: Bureau Assignments, Transition at Holst, Projects that Defined 2016, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Portland Japanese Garden Expansion by Kengo Kuma, which Portland Architecture chose as one of the projects that defined 2016

Portland new Mayor Ted Wheeler announced the new City Council bureau assignments, giving himself the Portland Housing Bureau, the Portland Development Commission and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The mayor gave new Commissioner Chloe Eudaly the Bureau of Development Services. The DJC covered the reaction* from some of Portland’s well known developers.

The Portland Business Journal published images of Moovel’s new headquarters inside the renovated Overland Warehouse Company building.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting has opened in the 811 Stark building.

After 25 years in business, Holst Architecture announced a transition in the ownership of the firm.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the sale of an office building at 1500 NE Irving St to Swift Real Estate Partners. A new four story 60 unit apartment building is currently planned on the site of the  building’s surface parking lot.

Portland Architecture wrote about the projects that defined 2016, including: the Swift headquarters at 1638 NW Overton Stthe Japanese Garden expansionPortland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion; Burnside Bridgehead developments Slate and Yardthe renovation of the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway; and many more.

The Business Tribune looked at plans by developer Project^ for the Field Office in Northwest Portland.

Portland Parks & Recreation has begun design work for the “North Reach” of the South Waterfront Greenway. BikePortland looked at the different concepts being studied.

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Weekly Roundup: 9101 Foster, 1725 SE Tenino, Hotel Chamberlain, and more

9101 SE Foster

9101 Foster by Hacker

A gas explosion in NW Portland destroyed the 110 year old Wilfred & Gustav Burkhardt Building, and caused significant damage to nearby buildings including Allied Works’ Ann Sacks Residence at 2281 NW Glisan St. The explosion happened after an underground gas pipeline was struck by a subcontractor performing pre-construction work at the site of the future Restoration Hardware.

The DJC wrote about the partnership* between Beam Development and Urban Development + Partners, who first collaborated on the Central Eastside building SlateFuture projects include the adaptive reuse of the Hotel Chamberlain at 509 SE Grand Ave, a 13-story mixed-use development at 550 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, and a mid-rise creative office building at 525 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

Construction finished over the summer at Milwaukie Way, the Westmoreland retail development that wraps around Relish gastropub. The Portland Business Journal took a look at how it turned out.

Eater reported that Catalan restaurant Can Font will open a second location, in the ground floor of the Cosmopolitan on the Park.

The Oregonian reported that modern Mexican restaurant Alto Bajo will open early next year in the Hi Lo Hotel.

The Portland Mercury reported that Sellwood burger restaurant Mike’s Drive-In is likely to be replaced by new apartments. Developer UDG recently requested Early Assistance for a 78 unit residential building at 1725 SE Tenino St.

Portland Architecture discussed the design of Portland Art Museum’s proposed Rothko Pavilion with museum director Brian Ferriso.

The Portland Business Journal reported that a groundbreaking ceremony for 9101 Foster was planned for Sunday. The PDC developed building in Lents Town Center will include 54 apartments–16 of which will be affordable housing–and 9,000 sq ft of retail space.

Kevin Howard of Northwest Self Storage wrote in the Portland Business Journal about the boom and the impending bust of self-storage facilities in Portland.

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Weekly Roundup: Rothko Pavilion, Alphabet District Downzoning, 5035 NE Sandy, and more

Rothko Pavilion

The Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion

The Oregonian reported on Portland Art Museum’s multimillion-dollar expansion. The Rothko Pavilion will connect the museum’s two existing buildings, which are currently only joined below ground. Places Over Time took a look at Vinci Hamp Architects’ design for the structure.

The Business Tribune wrote about a request by the Northwest District Association to downzone parts of the Alphabet Historic District, which would reduce the amount of housing that could be built in the area. According to the paper it would “kill” plans to build a 160-unit project at 1727 NW Hoyt St, which “would provide 60 years of affordability for seniors making $15,000 or less.”

The DJC wrote about plans by Oregon Democrats to “introduce a package of legislation next year to lift a ban on rent control and provide new protections to tenants facing eviction.” *

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the developers lining “up to back Portland’s affordable housing measure“.

Despite not having an approved design, a ground-breaking ceremony was held for the Multnomah County Central Courthousereported the Business Tribune. The building is scheduled to go in front of the Historic Landmarks Commission for approval on October 24th.

Venerable Properties has released details of what will replace Der Rheinlander at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd. A new “multi-specialty health care center” owned by The Portland Clinic will be built on the site, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The Central Eastside’s newest coworking space has opened in Slatereported the Portland Business Journal. CENTRL Office will occupy 22,000 sq ft of space across two floors of the Burnside Bridgehead building.

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