Weekly Roundup: Sandy Blvd, Sky3, St Francis Park Apartments, and more

St Francis Park Apartments

The recently completed St Francis Park Apartments.

With a potential large development planned at the Pepsi bottling facility at 2505 NE Pacific, the DJC asked if it is Sandy Boulevard’s moment?*

The Willamette Week reported that “one of the largest and most popular food cart pods in Portland”, located at 2880 SE Division St, is closing to become apartments.

The Portland Tribune looked at the push by homeless advocates to ensure affordable housing developments include Permanent Supportive Housing units, such as those at the recently completed St Francis Park Apartments.

According to the Oregonian, Amazon will be opening a pickup location near PSU in the ground floor of the recently completed Sky3 tower.

The Willamette Week reported that critics are blasting a “plan to divert money earmarked for the black community to help a health care giant” at N Williams and Knott.

According to the Portland Business Journal “no fewer than 27 hotels have either opened since 2015 or are under construction or planned for the metro region”. The paper published a gallery of the some of the hotel projects that are adding thousands of rooms to Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: 33 Affordable Housing Developments Planned for Portland (images)

St Francis Park Apartments

The St Francis Park Apartments, currently under construction in the Central Eastside.

Last December the Portland Housing Bureau delivered its second annual State of Housing Report to the City Council. The report noted the many challenges facing Portland, including that in 2016 “data indicates that housing affordability in Portland in the last year has gotten worse, an issue that is disproportionately impacting low-income residents, Communities of Color, seniors, and individuals with disabilities”. Nonetheless, the report also looked at what the Bureau is doing to address these issues, including: gaining voter-approval of a $258 million Affordable Housing Bond; passage of an Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance; increasing urban renewal funding dedicated to affordable rental housing; and dedicating short-term rental revenue tax to affordable rental housing.

The report listed nearly 1,900 affordable housing units in the production pipeline, split between 33 developments. Next Portland is re-publishing the entire list, along with images and information about the architect / developer where we have it.

Some buildings on the list are exclusively reserved for lower income people, while others include a mix of market rate units and subsidized affordable units. Figures for levels of affordability, expressed as number of units reserved for individuals or families at a percentage of Area Median Income (AMI), are taken from the Housing Bureau Report. Buildings that include market units are only receiving city funding towards the affordable units. Note that this list does not contain any buildings which will be required to provide affordable housing as part of the newly passed Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance (which came into effect this month); any future projects funded through the voter approved affordable housing bond; any developments that are funded without the help of the Portland Housing Bureau; or any developments that have been allocated funding since the publication of the report late last year.

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Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of 2016


The post about 5 MLK’s first Design Advice Request hearing was Next Portland’s most popular post of the year. [See this follow up post for the most recent images of the project.]

2016 is the second full year Next Portland has been in operation. With development showing no signs of slowing down it’s been a busy year. We published 234 new blog posts, and our development map now has almost 800 unique projects listed (including completed and cancelled projects). Over the course of the year the site had almost 900,000 page views; up 84% over 2015.

6 of the articles that made the top 25 viewed posts were published in 2015; 2 were published in 2014. Our second most popular article from the 2015 list, about the Goat Blocks, was still the fourth most popular article of 2016 despite having been written in December 2014. Our most popular post of 2015, about the 25 tallest buildings planned in the city, remained in the list at third place, and was just beaten out in popularity by the updated 2016 list. Two pioneering Cross Laminated Timber buildings, Carbon12 and Framework, took up three places on the list.

In reverse order, here are our 25 most popular posts of the year:

  1. Under construction in the Pearl – The Abigail (images)
  2. City Council overturns Design Commission; Jupiter Hotel will be clad in Asphalt Shingles (images)
  3. Design Reviewed for High-Rise Timber Building Framework (images)
  4. Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland
  5. Design Commission approves 15 story building at 4th & Harrison (images)
  6. Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75 (images)
  7. 1510 NE Multnomah has third Design Advice hearing (images)
  8. Design Commission approves Block 20 condominium tower (images)
  9. 17 story tower planned for Fishels Furniture site (drawings)
  10. Works Partnership present 19 story Burnside Bridgehead tower to Design Commission (images)
  11. 30 Story Tower Planned at SW 11th & Washington
  12. Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67 (Images)
  13. Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)
  14. Under Construction: Pearl Block 136 (images)
  15. North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton (images)
  16. Focus: 20 new hotels proposed for Portland
  17. Design Approved for Framework, America’s Tallest Timber Building (images)
  18. Lloyd Cinemas Parking Lot Redevelopment Approved (images)
  19. Portland Housing Bureau announces Super NOFA projects (images)
  20. Under Construction: The Porter hotel (images)
  21. Design Approved for First Tall Cross-laminated Timber Building in America (images)
  22. LOCA @ the Goat Blocks (images)
  23. Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction (2015)
  24. Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)
  25. 5 MLK receives Design Advice (images)

Weekly Roundup: 72Foster, University of Portland residences, 1320 Broadway and more

5350 N Willamette Blvd by Soderstrom Architects

New student housing at the University of Portland, by Soderstrom Architects

Eater PDX wrote that restaurant Touché is “in a weird sort of limbo” as they wait for news about the fate of their building. The historic Firehouse #3 may be demolished to make way for a 12 story building at 505 NW 14th Ave.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of an under construction residence hall at the University of Portland. The building at 5350 N Willamette Blvd by Soderstrom Architects will include “three above-grade floors of student living units, a ground-floor student worship space, student lounge, and office/retail space.”

The Foster Powell blog wrote about the 72Foster affordable housing development, which will include 108 housing units and commercial space lining SE Foster.

The Oregonian reported that Portland area rents rose 13 percent over the past year, however noted that “a wave of new construction slowed the price appreciation a little since the fall and caused the vacancy rate to tick upward.”

Mayor Hales has proposed an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan that would prohibit new drive throughs in the Central City and limit them elsewhere, reports the Willamette Week.

A Vancouver, WA have donated $12 million to OHSU, which will go towards the patient housing being built as part of the Center for Health and Healing South project.

An 86 year old funeral home may be demolished, reported the Portland Chronicle. The building is located at 20 NE 14th Ave, a site where the Bureau of Development Services recently received an Early Assistance application to discuss a six-story mixed-use building with 190 residential units.

Elemental Technologies will move their headquarters into the 1320 Broadway building. The building was formerly home to The Oregonian, and is currently in the middle of a major renovation.

Portland Architecture talked with Stuart Emmons, an architect who is running against incumbent Steve Novick for a seat on the Portland City Council.

Portland International Airport is reevaluating its $98 million Concourse E Expansion, according to The Oregonian. Portland based Horizon Air recently ordered 30 Embraer E175 jets, which can be board via jetbridges. The airport’s original expansion plan was designed for the Bombardier Q400 plans Horizon currently flies, which typically board from the ground.

KPTV reported that a demonstration was held by the group “Stop Demolishing Portland” outside 3336 SE Belmont, which is set to be redeveloped with a three story mixed use building.

Coworking and shared office company Regus opened a space in the Pearl West office building this week, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The St Francis Park Apartments received a $9.5 million loan from KeyBank, reported the Portland Business Journal. The Central Eastside building will include 106 units of affordable housing.

Thru Magazine wrote about a Design Week Portland panel discussion about the future of the Central Eastside. The event was hosted by Bora Architects, who showcased their Water Avenue Yards concept.

The PSU Vanguard reported that the Portland State Vikings celebrated a groundbreaking for the PSU Viking Pavilion ahead of their annual spring game.


Metro Reports: Mason Ehrman Building Annex, St Francis Park Apartments, 97th Ave Gymnasium and more

St Francis Park Apartments

The St Francis Park Apartments by MWA Architects, which will include 106 units of affordable housing.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits. We publish the highlights.

Brett Schulz Architecture have requested Early Assistance for a project at 10561 SE Division St:

Remove existing one story building and build new two story building adding 150 ft drive thru which will enter on SE 106th ave and exit on to SE division.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 1332 N Skidmore St:

Proposed 5-story apartment building with underground parking.

Oh Planning+Design architecture have requested Early Assistance for a project at 10234 NE Prescott St:

Early Assistance – Planner only – to discuss the construction of a three story building with associated site improvements at MHCC Maywood.  

FFA Architecture + Interiors have requested Early Assistance for a project at 1320 NW 17th Ave:

Proposing a mixed-use building with ground floor retail and 6 multi-family units at the first floor plus 8 floors of multi-family apartments and underground parking.

Deacon Development Group have scheduled a Pre-Application Conference to discuss a project at 4224 NE Halsey St:

100 unit apartment building proposed on the NE corner of the site.

VWR Development have submitted a project at 3910 NE Garfield Ave for Design Review:

4-story multi-family apartment building. Please note there is a concurrent review happening for a Amendment to LU 13-102007 LDS, with an adjustment to minimum lot dimensions and a lot consolidation. That concurrent case is LU 16-132893 AS, LC, AD.

Holst Architecture have submitted the Asian Health and Services Center at 9005 SE Foster Rd for Design Review:

Design review for new 29,000 sq ft 3-story building which will include offices, community gathering spaces, and ground floor office lease space. Modification request to loading standards. Modification request to on-site locations of vehicle areas.

Building permits are under review for projects at the Muslim Community Center, located at 5325 N Vancouver Ave:

New construction of modular building

New construction of pavilion

A building permit is under review for a project at 432 NE Jessup St:

Construct new 3 store (12) unit apartment building with associated site utilities

A building permit was issued to SERA Architects for the renovation of the Mason Ehrman Building Annex at 222 NW 5th Ave:

Core and shell renovation of historic building for future (B) tenants, change of occupancy from (S1) to (B), remodel all 3 stories of annex portion of building; includes seismic upgrade to annex. Includes seismic upgrades to adjacent Kalberer tower per stipulation of temporary certificate of occupancy of permit 00-159263CO; ; site work includes work in ROW and street trees/landscaping

A building permit was issued to MWA Architects for the St Francis Park Apartments at 1177 SE Stark St:

new 4-story, 72,055 sf, Type VA, 106 unit apartment building including improvements in vacated SE Oak St to meet superblock requirements.

Building permits were issued to Mentrum Architecture for a project at 1340 NE Killingsworth St:

New 3 story apartment building with 6 units, 50 sq ft detached trash enclosure, associated site work. North building, 1 of 2, **w/ 14-255316-CO**.

New 3 story apartment building with 6 units. South building, 2 of 2, **w/ 14-255312-CO**

A building permit was issued to LRS Architects for a project at 2330 NW Raleigh St:

New fourstory, 40unit apartment complex with lobby; on site bike parking and interior trash enclosure;including site work

A building permit was issued to Allusa Architecture for the 97th Ave Gymnasium:

Construct new gymnasium, new parking area with accessible stall, repave existing parking area at 4 plex, 98 sq ft trash enclosure

A building permit was issued to Architects Van Lom Group for a project at 13031 SE Foster Rd:

Construction of new 68-unit assisted care facility


The changing face of Portland’s Central Eastside

240 Clay

In 1922 Euclid, Ohio adopted a zoning ordinance that included six classes of use, intended to preserve to the village character of the Cleveland suburb. Industry would be kept away from residential uses, and building heights would be limited. While Frank Lloyd Wright’s Broadacre City and Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse are probably more famous examples of city planning based on separation of uses, Euclid’s zoning ordinance ultimately became the more influential. A large landowner sued the municipality, arguing that in limiting the development potential of their site Euclid had unconstitutionally deprived them of their ability to develop their site with an industrial use.

The case made it all the Supreme Court. In the 1926 case Village of Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. the court sided with the village, establishing the broad precedent that single-use zoning was permissible. While there are other types of zoning used in the US, the model used by Euclid is by far the most common, and is often referred to by planners as Euclidean zoning.

Around the same time, Portland was writing its first zoning code, firmly based on the emerging Euclidean tradition. The 1924 code didn’t regulate many of the things we now expect to find in a zoning code, such as heights, setbacks or density. It did separate the city into four zones, based on use: Class I-Single Family; Class II-Multi-family; Class III-Business-manufacturing; and Class IV-Unrestricted. Many of the decisions made almost a century ago are still evident in the way Portland is developing today. The 1924 code applied the Business-manufacturing zone to the streetcar lines and arterial roads, while limiting the areas in between them to single or multifamily development. The Class I-Single Family zone was generally applied to the most prestigious neighborhoods, such as Eastmoreland, Laurelhurst, Irvington and Alameda. Plus ça change…

…continue reading our guest post at Portland Architecture.

Design Commission approves affordable housing on St Francis Park (images)

The Design Commission has approved designs for the St Francis Park Apartments by MWA Architects. The building will include 106 units of affordable housing, including for women transitioning from homelessness and victims of domestic and sexual violence. The project is being delivered as a partnership between government agency Home Forward and nonprofit Catholic Charities.

St Francis Park Apartments

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Metro Reports: St Francis Park apartments, International School, 2100 SE Belmont and more

The St Francis Park apartments by MWA Architects, which are currently working their way through Design Review

The St Francis Park apartments by MWA Architects, which are currently working their way through the Design Review process

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of early assistance applications, land use reviews and building permits. We publish the highlights.

ZGF Architects have requested Early Assistance for a parking garage at 500 NE Multnomah St:

New 700 space 6 level parking garage with retail on the first floor.

Rommel Architectural Partnership have requested Early Assistance for a project at 520 SE 82nd Ave:

Proposal is for retail development with new 13,000 sf shop building and 1700 sf drive-thru building with food or beverage use.

SolTerra have submitted The Woods for building permit review:

Construct new 6 story mixed use 50 unit apartment building; main level to include parking garage, bike storage, lobby area, and retail space;

MWA Architects have submitted the St Francis Park Apartments for building permit review:

new 4-story, 72,055 sf, Type VA, 106 unit apartment building including improvements in vacated SE Oak St to meet superblock requirements.

BAMA Design have submitted a project at 2558 SE 109th Ave for building permit review:

New single story 15 bed residential care facility

A building permit was issued to Urban Development Group for a building at 2100 SE Belmont St:

Construct new 4 story 55 unit apartment building with underground parking; associated site work

A building permit was issued to BAMA Design for a project at 7400 SE Milwaukie Ave:

New 4 story 76 unit apartment building with basement level parking garage

A building permit was issued to Mahlum Architects for the International School Expansion:

New construction of three-story classroom building and related site improvements


Metro Reports: St Francis Park Apartments, PSU School of Business Administration, 4th & Harrison and more

4th & Harrison

4th & Harrison, as presented at Design Advice

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of early assistance applications, land use reviews and building permits. We publish the highlights.

Barry Smith Architect has requested Early Assistance for a project at 518 SE 76th Ave:

46 unit apartment building with 8 cars in parking garage; 4 floors

BAMA Architecture and Design have requested Early Assistance for a project at 10010 SE Ankeny St:

Lot line adjustment and phased development of multiple buildings to include multi-family, parking, industrial flex space.

Solterra have requested Early Assistance for a project at N Failing & Vancouver:

53-unit mixed use apartment building with active urban canyon

Works Partnership have requested Early Assistance for a project at 1400 NW 22nd Ave:

Proposal for major commercial alterations with exterior improvements. Uses will include office, retail and manufacturing.

Barry Smith Architect has requested Early Assistance for a project at 829 NW 19th Ave:

Move existing home on property to within 20 feet of NW 19th. Confirm and adjust lot lines for 2 lots. On Vacant lot develop a 50 unit, 6 story apartment building located within the Alphabet Historic District.

Mortenson Development have scheduled a Pre-Application Conference to discuss a new hotel at 619 SW 11th Ave:

demolish existing 1/4 block building and replace with a new construction 221 room, 15 floor hotel.

A Design Review has been submitted for a project at 1112 SE Lincoln St:

Construction of 2 tri-plex residential structures – one on each parcel

The St Francis Park Apartments by MWA Architects have been submitted for Design Review:

New 106-unit multi-dwelling residential development.

The 4th & Harrison apartment complex by Core Spaces has been submitted for Design Review:

Design Review for new 15-story glass and metal panel building – grocery store at ground level and 14 stories of luxury residential apartments, above. 1 modification requested to reduce landscape area; 1 modification requested to replace landscaping with hardscape; 1 modification requested for the width of the oriel window; 1 adjustment requested to parking access & loading; 1 adjustment requested for # of parking stalls.

ZGF Architects have submitted the Canopy Hotel for Design Review:

11 Story, 150 room Hotel

SRG Partnership have applied for building permits for the PSU School of Business Administration:

40,000 Sf multi-story addition, renovation of 52,000SF existing

Reroute on site utilities, demo on site portion of sky bridge, remove exerior cladding of existing building, interior demolition. ***40,000 SF multi-story addition, renovation of 52,000SF existing***

foundation and walls to grade of pavilion/atrium, cladding of existing building, ***40,000 SF multi-story addition, renovation of 52,000SF existing***

Demolition permits were issued for the existing buildings due to be replaced by the Pearl Hampton Inn & Suites:

Demo existing 2 story building

Demo two story building; no basement

Demo existing 3 story building with partial basement

A building permit was issued for the Kenton Mixed Use Phase III at 2111 N Willis Blvd:

New four story apartment building with courtyard and balcony at center, 37 units, 2 retail spaces on main floor, parking at east and north sides, detached trash enclosure, associated landscaping and stormwater facilities

A building permit was issued to Anrkom Moisan Architects for 2010 NW Pettygrove St:

new 5-story, 49 unit apartment with tucked under parking

Weekly Roundup: Multnomah County Courthouse, Revolution Hall and more

Block 136

Block 136

  • Block 136, the Tess O’Brien Apartments and the Lloyd Center Remodel were due before the Design Commission on Thursday.
  • In a 4-1 decision, the City Council voted to reject the proposal to demolish a building at 1727 NW Hoyt.
  • In ‘Stark Changes‘ and ‘A New Old Town II‘ Places over Time wrote about the St Francis Park Apartments and Block 8L respectively.
  • The Portland Mercury reported that Revolution Hall, the music venue inside the newly renovated Washington High School, has announced its first shows.
  • Portland Architecture wrote about the design forum for the James Beard Public Market, in which the team from Snøhetta met with various groups, including University of Oregon students.
  • The Oregonian reported that Multnomah County voted to choose “an L-shaped lot at the west end of the Hawthorne Bridge” as its preferred site for a new courthouse.
  • The Portland Chronicle published photos of the demolition of a 1947 warehouse located at 1916 SE 50th. Though no construction permits have been filed yet, the blog speculates that it will become multifamily housing, given that the property is owned by Urban Development Group.