Weekly Roundup: HB 2001, 10th & Alder Carts, Portland Design Commission, and more

Block 216
The 10th & Alder food cart pod closed over the weekend, in advance of construction of Block 216. The 35-story tower will include a food hall along its entire SW 9th Ave frontage.

Oregon’s first-in-the-nation middle housing bill passed on Sunday, after initially crashing up against the fallout from the Republican walkout. HB 2001 legalizes duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes in the residential zones of cities across the state.

LEVER Architecture project director Chandra Robinson has been appointed to the Design Commission*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Sunday was the last day for the 10th & Alder food carts, which are moving to make way for Block 216. Eater Portland collected people’s reflections on what was Oregon’s largest food cart pod. An anonymous donation covered the cost of towing, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Modera Morrison Receives Design Advice (images)

Design Advice has been offered on the Modera Morrison, a 7-story building being designed by SERA Architects for Mill Creek Residential Trust. The project would include approximately 245 units, with two levels of below grade parking.

The building will be subject to the city’s inclusionary housing rules, which require the provision of affordable housing or the payment of a fee-in-lieu.

Modera Morrison
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Weekly Roundup: James Beard Public Market, Field Office, 333 SW Park, and more

Interior view of the James Beard Public Market

Interior view Snøhetta’s design for the James Beard Public Market at the Morrison Bridgehead site

Portland Architecture broke the news that the James Beard Public Market will no longer be built at the Morrison Bridgehead site. The market’s board of directors is now investigating other sites. The Oregonian reported that the Morrison Bridgehead site, formerly owned by Multnomah County, is now owned by MMDC Company.

With work underway on the Field Office , on NW Front Ave, The Oregonian reported that developer Project^ “imagines new neighborhood north of the Pearl“.

In Downtown, Project^ are planning a major renovation of a building at 333 SW Park, which will convert it to creative office space with a ground-floor restaurant. While the project goes through the permitting phase, The DJC reported* that the building will be used as a temporary homeless shelter.*

Site work has begun on the Multnomah County Central Courthouseaccording to The Oregonian.

As part of its “Regional Snapshots” series Metro took a look at Portland-area housing costs, and the factors that influence them.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Restore Oregon Offers Aid to Historic Building Owners with New Preservation Toolkit

This is a repost of an email release by Restore Oregon, republished with their permission.

Restore Oregon Preservation Toolkit

The enduring popularity and charm of older buildings – and the growing recognition of their value to a community – means Restore Oregon, a non-profit preservation advocacy organization, receives hundreds of calls from all types of Oregonians. Calls come in daily from individuals, local agencies, and organizations requesting help to preserve historic properties, heritage barns, shuttered theaters, decommissioned schools, and just about anything else that can be considered a historic place.

To better serve Oregonians trying to understand and navigate the often daunting task of rehabilitating a historic structure for current use, and figuring out how to pay for it, the non-profit recently created a Preservation Toolkit.

The Preservation Toolkit offers a step-by-step framework to develop and execute a Preservation Plan for a historic property so it can be viably, sustainably reused. It’s a valuable tool for individual property owners, organizations from Main Street business associations to historical societies, and government agencies working to revive a historic building.  And thanks to grant funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust, Pacific Power, and the Oregon Community Foundation, it is available free of charge.

Individual modules tackle particular aspects of preservation planning in a logical way:

  • Preservation Process Overview: a simple flowchart illustrating the steps for a successful preservation project.
  • Orientation to Preservation & Adaptive Reuse: introductions to terminology, standards, organizations, and the National Register.
  • Condition Assessment Checklist: a top-to-bottom checklist for examining and documenting the current state of your property.
  • Creating a Viable Rehabilitation Plan: a guide to determining a feasible new use for your property, and testing the economic dollars and sense with financial pro forma templates.
  • Funding Sources & Incentives: bank loans, grants, tax credits – what is available and the associated stipulations.
  • Working with the Right Preservation Professionals: assembling the right team and understanding the role they play can make or break your project.
  • Organizing & Building Community Support: tips on telling your story and getting the community on board.
  • Maintenance Planning: what should be included in a maintenance plan and how to approach it.

The Preservation Toolkit is an effort to address the enormous need for preservation assistance and information across the state, and the fact that there are few resources to meet it.  From assessing the condition of a structure to developing a reuse strategy, understanding standards and regulations to locating contractors qualified to do the work and finding the money to pay for it, Restore Oregon’s Preservation Toolkit provides the roadmap.

It may be downloaded at www.RestoreOregon.org/preservation-toolkit.

BEST PRACTICES: A Guide to the City of Portland Design Review Process

Areas of the city subject to Design Review. With some exceptions, the Design Commission reviews projects in the blue areas. Projects in the purple areas typically only come before the Design Commission if they are appealed. Areas in white are not subject to Design Review.

Design Review Areas in the City of Portland. With some exceptions, the Design Commission reviews projects in the blue areas. Projects in the purple areas typically only come before the Design Commission if they are appealed. Projects in areas shaded white are not currently subject to Design Review, though expansion of Design Review is contemplated as part of the 2035 Comprehensive Plan.

The Portland Design Commission has released a best practices memo “intended to assist applicants successfully complete Portland’s Type III Design Review process” and to give “an understanding as to how the Design Commission upholds the Design Guidelines.” The memo is republished in its entirety below, without edits by Next Portland.

BEST PRACTICES: A Guide to the City of Portland Design Review Process (May 2016)

This Best Practices document is intended to assist applicants successfully complete Portland’s Type III Design Review process. It is intended to increase the level of predictability for applicants by giving them an understanding as to how the Design Commission upholds the Design Guidelines. It is likely that applicants who utilize this document, while also collaborating with Bureau of Development Services (BDS) Planning Staff throughout the process, can lessen the need for redesign and also reduce the number of submittal packets and hearings before the Commission. This document will be updated periodically as it strives to convey to applicants the most up‐to‐date leanings of the current Commission membership.

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