Weekly Roundup: Broadway Corridor, Holden of Pearl, Hyatt Place, and more

Broadway Corridor
The redevelopment of the former USPS Processing and Distribution Center in the Pearl could include up to 4 million square feet of new commercial, employment, and residential development.

Issues around the Green Loop still lingered at a second Design Advice Request meeting* for the Broadway Corridor, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

KGW reported on the concerns of Pearl District neighbors around the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences at NW 12th and Flanders. The 23-story tower had its first Type III Design Review hearing last week.

A groundbreaking ceremony was conducted for 1715 SW Salmon, reports Multifamily News. The project will be the first building developed by Greystar in Portland.

The Business Tribune wrote about the first Design Review hearing for the Holden of Pearl, a proposed senior housing development at NW 13th & Quimby.

The latest proposal for the relocation of the 10th & Alder food carts is for 30 carts to relocate to Ankeny Square at SW Park and Ankeny, according to the Oregonian. The carts lost their former home to make way for the Block 216 tower. A previous plan would have seen them moved to the North Park Blocks.

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Weekly Roundup: Block 216, Blackburn Building, Tree Farm, and more

Portland Architecture talked to Ben Carr of Brett Schulz Architect, whose projects include the under construction Tree Farm building.

The developer of Block 216 announced that they have secured a $460 million construction loan. A groundbreaking ceremony for the project was held on Friday, with completion of the tower set for 2023.

The Oregonian looked at Portland’s biggest construction projects right now.

The Oregonian reported that lawmakers are pumping cash into the James Beard Public Market, at a time that its backers say it will be “dead in a matter of months unless substantial progress is made”.

Central City Concern’s Blackburn Building opened its doors last week. The building includes a clinic, pharmacy and beds for 175 Portlanders, reports the Portland Tribune.

Portland Architecture talked to Ben Carr, a project architect at Brett Schulz Architect, about the firm’s evolution, and collaborations with Guerrilla Development.

The Portland Housing Bureau’s development at 3000 SE Powell Blvd went in front of the Design Commission for a second time. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that Commissioner’s hoped that the project could create a new context along Powell Blvd*.

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Weekly Roundup: HB 2001, 10th & Alder Carts, Portland Design Commission, and more

Block 216
The 10th & Alder food cart pod closed over the weekend, in advance of construction of Block 216. The 35-story tower will include a food hall along its entire SW 9th Ave frontage.

Oregon’s first-in-the-nation middle housing bill passed on Sunday, after initially crashing up against the fallout from the Republican walkout. HB 2001 legalizes duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes in the residential zones of cities across the state.

LEVER Architecture project director Chandra Robinson has been appointed to the Design Commission*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Sunday was the last day for the 10th & Alder food carts, which are moving to make way for Block 216. Eater Portland collected people’s reflections on what was Oregon’s largest food cart pod. An anonymous donation covered the cost of towing, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Weekly Roundup: HB 2001, Block 216, Elks Children’s Eye Clinic, and more

OHSU Elks Children's Eye Clinic
Construction is proceeding rapidly at the OHSU Elks Children’s Eye Clinic on Marquam Hill.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the 251 hotel rooms at Block 216 will become the Pacific Northwest’s first Ritz-Carlton hotel. The hotel operator will also manage the 138 condominium units in the tower.

Portland officials have a plan to save the carts currently located at the 10th & Alder lot, reports the Oregonian. The carts would move to the North Park Blocks on a temporary basis while a longer term solution is sought.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about how the steel framing system being employed at the OHSU Elks Children’s Eye Clinic is saving the hospital time and money.

Oregon’s “landmark measure” to legalize duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes throughout the state is one step closer to passage, writes OPB. HB 2001 passed the state House of Representatives with a 43-16 vote. The Willamette Week reported that in the lead up to the vote Portland Public Schools had lobbied in support of the bill, on the basis of creating diversity within neighborhood housing.

Portland’s affordable housing bond is off to strong start, according to a City Auditor report, but risks not serving veterans and seniors as promised.

Weekly Roundup: Portland Building, Architecture Employment, HB 2001, and more

Portland Building
A report by the City Auditor was critical of aspects of the Portland Building rebuild.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about how architecture and engineering employment continues to surge*, with firms such as SERA, LRS and ZGF now significantly larger than they have been in the past.

The Oregonian reported on an audit that found that the cost of the Portland Building rebuild was obscured by creative accounting.

A load of falsework props spilled at the 140 SW Columbia construction site, reports the Oregonian. There were no injuries.

As the 2019 legislative session draws to a close, HB 2001 is likely to reach the floors of the House and Senate in the next week, reports OPB. The bill, sponsored by House Speaker Tina Kotek, would legalize duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes in cities across Oregon.

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Weekly Roundup: OMSI Masterplan, Lloyd Center, Jefferson Station, and more

The OMSI masterplan envisions realigning SE Water Avenue to run along the perimeter of the site.

As much as 2 million square feet of development in the Central Eastside is proposed as part of the OMSI Masterplan, reports the Oregonian—the equivalent of two U.S. Bancorp Towers. The masterplan went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Advice Request meeting last week.

The Broadway Corridor Masterplan also had its first Design Advice Request meeting. Commissioners praised “the change it would bring to the area but [took] issue with the intended use of the city’s Green Loop,”* according to the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Business Tribune published an interview with outgoing Lloyd Center manager Bob Dye. Work is set to start soon on the Lloyd West Anchor Remodel, which will include a Live Nation venue. The center recently presented revised plans for the Lloyd East Anchor Remodel to the Design Commission.

The Willamette Week reported that the cost of building new schools and affordable housing could rise under the Portland Clean Energy Fund, due the fact that large construction companies are being classified as “retail businesses.”

The Business Tribune spoke to 10 food carts about their plans for where they will go after construction starts on Block 216. The Oregonian wrote about 10 carts that turned downtown Portland’s biggest food cart pod into a tourist destination.

A Portland preservationist, and former chair of the Historic Landmarks Commission, wants the Jefferson Station building removed from the National Register of Historic Places, reports the Oregonian. The shell of the historic building is being incorporated into the new Multnomah County Central Courthouse.

The Business Tribune wrote about Opsis Architecture at 20.

Multnomah County hopes to create an alternative to jail or the emergency room for mentally ill homeless people at the recently purchased 333 SW Park Ave building, writes the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: PDX Concourse E, Block 216, Wells Fargo Center, and more

Construction is well underway at the PDX Concourse E Extension. The expanded concourse is set to open to the public in 2020.

The Business Tribune wrote about how the PDX Concourse E Extension is making Southwest Airlines at home.

The Daily Journal of Commerce broke the news that vendors at the 10th & Alder food cart pod have until June 30th to vacate the site. The carts and surface parking will be replaced by the Block 216 hotel, office and condominium tower.

After nearly 20 years in business, Myhre Group Architects will soon shut down, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the N Williams Center, which will include 60 units of affordable housing.

Eater Portland reports that Los Angeles “restaurant vet” Doug Miriello is opening a food hall at the Wells Fargo Center.

The Portland Diamond Project has received a 6-month extension to further study the Port of Portland Terminal 2 site, reports the Oregonian.

The Parking Minute argued against reducing parking minimums only where directly adjacent to transit, citing the example of the Dairy Apartments planned at 801 NE 21st Ave.

Weekly Roundup: Eastside Innovation Hub, 7 Southeast Stark, Tanner Point, and more

A new top story will be added to an existing building at SE 8th & Alder as part of its conversion into the Eastside Innovation Hub.

The Business Tribune wrote about two bioscience buildings planned by Summit Development: the Eastside Innovation Hub at 808 SE Alder, which will add a new story to an existing building; and the New Industrial Revolution Center, a 10-story cross-laminated timber building planned at 920 SE Stark St.

The Daily Journal of Commerce visited 7 Southeast Stark, an under construction building that is “either a major new office project with ample parking, or a major new parking project with an office component.”*

Portland Architecture wrote about two recent office buildings designed by Hacker, including Tanner Point at the north end of the Pearl.

With three attempts at redeveloping Centennial Mills ending in failure, Brian Libby argued in the Business Tribune that it should become an industrial ruins park.

A man who was in an apparent mental crisis scaled the construction crane at 5 MLK and remained at the top for more than five hours, reports the Oregonian.

Fast food restaurant Super Deluxe will open a second location in the Pearl District’s Heartline building, reports Eater Portland.

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Weekly Roundup: Lincoln High School, 333 SW Park, 72 Foster, and more

Bora presented the latest design for the Lincoln High School rebuild to the Design Commission on Thursday of last week.

The changes made to Lincoln High School were received warmly by the Design Commission*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Up for Growth claims that Portland’s Inclusionary Housing policy is slowing the development of apartments projects, writes the Portland Tribune. The Portland House Bureau however disagrees.

OPB Think Out Loud spoke to a range of people about HB 2001, the bill that would end local bans on duplexes, triplexes and fourplex in low density zones.

Multnomah County bought a building at 333 SW Park for use as a mental health and addiction resource center. The county however lacks the “funds to operate it or a detailed plan for what to do with it“, according to the Willamette Week.

The Business Tribune wrote about 72 Foster, a recently completed 101-unit affordable housing development that also includes ground floor retail.

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Weekly Roundup: Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building, Live Nation South Waterfront, The Canyons, and more

The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will be located across the street from the existing building, and include a skybridge over SW 6th Ave.

A resident-run retirement community is planning a $100 million expansion, reports the Oregonian. The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will rise to 10 stories and include 127 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

Live Nation is in talks with the Zidell family to build a 10,000-seat performance venue in South Waterfront, according to the Oregonian.

Turner Construction is rushing to complete work* on the Providence Park Expansion in time for the Portland Timbers’ home opener on June 1, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Prosper Portland has selected the “Play” concept for the Broadway Corridor, writes the Oregonian. The concept would see the former post office “replaced with sports fields and basketball courts flanked by high-rises.”

A proposed bill in the Oregon legislature aims to create more lower priced condominium units. Developments that go through a more stringent envelope inspection would see the period for lawsuits reduced from 10 years to six, and require approval from a majority of homeowners to initiate a lawsuit.

The 101 affordable apartments at 72 Foster are now complete. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the development, which has an “intergenerational focus.”

The Business Tribune wrote about how at The Canyons developer Ben Kaiser is creating a “community with no limits on age or accessibility.”

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