Weekly Roundup: PSU Viking Pavilion, Fremont Place, Providence Park, and more

PSU Viking Pavilion

Construction has wrapped up on the PSU Viking Pavilion

In a 3-2 vote the City Council re-opened the door for approval of the Fremont Place Apartments, according to the Oregonian.  The Northwest Examiner asked why the issue was all about protecting views of the Fremont Bridge… until it was not?

The Business Tribune reported that the Bridgetown Lofts have been sold to Madison Park Financial Corporation for $55 million.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the affordable housing under construction at NW 14th & Raleigh in the Pearl.

Before its opening last week, the Oregonian had a sneak peak at the PSU Viking Pavilion.

The Portland City Council voted to increase building heights on Old Town Chinatown Block 33 to 160′, reports the Portland Mercury.

Work is wrapping up* on first-phase of Providence Park Expansion, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The second phase is expected in time for the opening of the spring 2019 MLS season.

Portland Monthly looked at Carbon 12the new condo tower that “is both sustainable and seismically strong.”

Portland Architecture talked with Carrie Strickland about the new era at Works Progress Architecture.

The Willamette Week reported that the Oregon ballot measure to fix housing finance prohibition has passed its first milestone.

The Oregonian reported on the Mayor’s conclusion that efforts to aid Portland’s black neighborhoods are an “abject failure”.

According to the Portland Business Journal Hilton has throw open the doors of its newest Portland luxury hotel, The Porter.

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Weekly Roundup: Adidas Campus Expansion, 1727 NW Hoyt, Restoration Hardware, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion is being designed by LEVER Architecture

Three new buildings are planned* as part of the Adidas Campus Expansion, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

In a two-part series, the Portland Tribune analyzed why new apartments so expensive and offered 9 ways to make apartments cheaper.

The Portland Tribune reported that polling for Metro shows that voters might support a $1 billion regional affordable housing bond.

The Oregonian wrote about wrote about the member of Portland’s Historic Landmarks Commission who is weighing in on a proposal at 1727 NW Hoyt Stdirectly across from her own house.

The Portland Business Journal published photos of the “posh new furnishings and design gallery” opened by Restoration Hardware on NW 23rd Ave.

The Business Tribune reported on the history of various development proposals for Old Town Chinatown Block 33.

Portland for Everyone argued that the Riverplace Redevelopment was saved by the city’s affordability mandate.

OPB reported on the future of the Artists Repertory Theatre, which will include selling half their site at 1515 SW Morrison St for new housing.

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Weekly Roundup: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Adidas Campus Expansion, Old Town heights, and more

Old Town Chinatown Block 33

An earlier scheme for the redevelopment of Old Town Chinatown Block 33 was presented to the Landmarks Commission in January 2017. The same architecture and development team are now working on a revised proposal that would orient the mass on the western half of the block, where they are seeking an increase in allowable height.

The Oregonian reported that the Adidas Campus Expansion will more than double the size of the company’s North American headquarters.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the public forum where the three developers* who are vying for the Broadway Corridor Development Opportunity introduced themselves. The Related Companies, Continuum Partners and McWhinney are competing to be chosen as the master developer for the 32-acre site.

Portland City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly reversed her vote on height increases at the waterfront. The change will allow the Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward.

The Oregonian wrote about the debate at City Council over whether heights should be increased on Old Town Chinatown Block 33

City Observatory published an open letter on housing affordability to Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, written by Portland State University Emeritus Professor Ethan Seltzer. An editorial in the Oregonian argued that the Portland City Council needs to reset its compass.

The Oregonian reported on high-rise apartment units rented as hotel rooms, including at The NV, Block 17 and Park Avenue West.

Portland Architecture interviewed GBD Architects’ Kyle Andersen & Phil Beyl about the firm’s 50 LEED projects (and counting).

A guest editorial in the Oregonian, written by Mark Edlen and Denis Hayes, argued that wood skyscrapers are coming and should be built with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.

The Skanner News broke the news that the Meyer Memorial Trust, the state’s second largest foundation, plans to build a new headquarters at N Vancouver and Tillamook.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a tax break for the developments that voluntarily choose to include affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

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Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Riverplace, Broadway Corridor, and more

Fremont Place Apartments

The City Council voted down the Fremont Place Apartments over concerns about the width of the Greenway trail

The Portland City Council voted 5-0 to overturn the Design Commission’s approval of the Fremont Place Apartmentsthe Pearl District apartment building opposed by neighbors. Portland for Everyone asked if it this would create an open season for NIMBY lawsuitsCity Observatory argued that Portland doesn’t really want to make housing affordable.

Later that day council voted down a series of zoning amendments that would be necessary for the Kengo Kuma-designed Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward

The Portland Tribune noted that the series of denials added up to the rejection of nearly 3,000 new homes.

The Willamette Week reported that three developers made the shortlist for the redevelopment of the post office site in the Pearl District, known as the Broadway Corridor.

Archinect wrote about the dismantling of the “iconic Portland Building‘s postmodern, multicolored facade”.

BikePortland reported on how the University of Portland’s Franz Campus has puts greenway advocates on edge.

Weekly Roundup: Lloyd Cinemas Redevelopment, Lloyd East Anchor, Portland River Center, and more

The second phase of the Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment, as presented to the Design Commission at its second Design Advice Hearing in November 2017

More than 1300 apartments are planned on the Lloyd Cinemas site, reports the Oregonian. Construction will soon start on the first phase at 1400 NE Multnomah. The second phase, at 1510 NE Multnomah, is set to go in front of the Design Commission for approval later this month.

The Oregonian also confirmed that Regal will operate the 14 screen cinema planned as part of the Lloyd East Anchor Remodel. The new cinema will be built before demolition begins on the current facility across the street, which was built in 1987.

The Willamette Week reported that City Council candidate Jo Ann Hardesty has named three high-profile advocates to advise her on housing policy.

According to the Portland Mercury the N/NE Portland Preference Policy has so far been “largely unsuccessful in helping former residents of North and Northeast Portland come back as homeowners.”

KGW published images of the University of Portland’s Franz Campus, also known as the River Campus.

The Portland Tribune wrote about the choices in front of the 32-member stakeholder advisory committee that advising Metro on in advance of a planned regional affordable housing bond.

After leaving the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park retailer Boys Fort has set up shop across the street, reports the Portland Business Journal.

In a message to its supporters the Portland River Center announced that they are not able to move forward with the building on the OMSI site.

Weekly Roundup: Canopy Hotel, Fremont Place, 5 MLK, and more

Canopy Hotel

A new restaurant named Canopy will open this May in the ZGF Architects designed Canopy Hotel.

Pearl District residents turned out at city council in an attempt to block the Fremont Place Apartmentswrites the Oregonian. The Willamette Week reported that a former president of the Pearl District Neighborhood Association warned that if efforts to block housing are successful the neighborhood “could become an urban gated community for the landed class.”

The Portland Mercury reported that the Canopy Restaurant will open this May in the Pearl District Canopy Hotel.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the demolition of the old OHSU School of Dentistry, which is being torn down with “Jurassic flair“*. The building will be replaced by the new OHSU Elk’s Children Eye Clinic.

The Portland Mercury reported that the decades old Chinese Village restaurant has closed its kitchen. A 20,480 square feet grocery store proposed for the site at 520 SE 82nd Ave was recently submitted for building permit review.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the demolition of the old Fishels Furniture building. It is being torn down to make way for the 5 MLK development.

Architect and City Council Candidate Stuart Emmons is “angling for the anti-development vote in Portland”, according to the Willamette Week.

The Portland Tribune profiled Carrie Strickland, founder and majority owner of Works Progress Architecture.

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Weekly Roundup: KEX Portland, Fremont Place, Jolene’s First Cousin, and more

Jolene's First Cousin

Guerilla Development’s Jolene’s First Cousin intends to provide affordable housing—without government subsidy.

The Willamette Week wrote about Jolene’s First Cousin, a development at 2834 SE Gladstone St that intends to provide housing for formerly homeless individuals, subsidized by market rate rents in the project’s commercial space.

With Portland’s “apartment-building binge appear[ing] to be headed off a cliff” the Oregonian asked whether the city’s inclusionary zoning mandate is to blame.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about The Vivian – KEX Portland, a proposed hostel with a ground-floor gastropub planned at a century-old apartment building at 110 N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

A couple years after artists were displaced from the Towne Storage building OPB asked whether Portland can save it arts.

The Portland Business Journal reported on a groundbreaking ceremony for Riverplace Parcel 3a large affordable housing development planned at the south end of downtown.

KGW reported on the Fremont Place Apartments, a “17-story tower [that] could block NW Portland views“.

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Weekly Roundup: Gladys McCoy Building, Vanishing Views, Oregon Constitution, and more

The Gladys McCoy building by ZGF Architects is currently rising at NW 6th & Hoyt

One year into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing ordinance, a memo from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability recommends exploring changes to the program* in order to ensure continued housing supplies, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The City of Portland wants to change the state constitution in order to build more affordable housing for its money, according to the Willamette Week.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the under construction Gladys McCoy Building, which will serve as the new headquarters for the Multnomah County Health Department. 

KOIN reported on “Portland’s vanishing views.”

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Weekly Roundup: Inclusionary Housing, FAR Transfers, Cross-Laminated Timber, and more

Framework

The Pearl District Framework development is set to break ground soon, but some environmental groups have concerns.

One year into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing program the Portland Mercury reported that the program is getting “lackluster results“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on a proposed change to the Inclusionary Housing program, that would affect condominiums*. According to Hoyt Street Properties the new regulations would cause them to “sell [their] remaining land or build office (space) instead”.

The Artists Repertory Theatre has been rescued by a $7 million anonymous donation, according to the Willamette Week. The company still however plans to sell half their block at 1515 SW Morrison St to a developer that intends to build a 218-foot residential tower on the site.

OPB wrote about a proposal by City Commissioner Fritz to amend the Central City 2035 Plan to allow Floor Area Ratio (FAR) transfers from the Open Space zone.

One year after a devastating explosion, the Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the reconstruction of the Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan St.

The Willamette Week reported that a coalition of environmental groups is criticizing the use of cross-laminated timber on the soon-to-break-ground Framework building.

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