Weekly Roundup: Overlook Apartments, Multnomah County Health Dept HQ, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The Multnomah County Health Department HQ has reached its full height

The Willamette Week reported that the Overlook Restaurant will close on January 21st. The diner at 1332 N Skidmore St will be replaced by the Overlook apartments, which will include 158 residential units.

The first new build affordable housing project financed with the voter approved $258 million housing bond will be on the site of the former Safari Showclub at 3000 SE Powell, writes the Oregonian.

The Multnomah County Health Department HQ has topped out, according to the Business Tribune. Completion is scheduled for early 2019.

By a 3-1 vote the Portland Art Museum received city council blessing to enclosure a pedestrian plaza and move forward with the Rothko Pavilion.

Weekly Roundup: The Porter, Riverplace Parcel 3, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The Xport Rooftop Lounge will be one of the dining options in the Porter Hotel, currently nearing completition at SW 2nd and Jefferson

Eater Portland wrote about the four unique dining options planned at Hilton’s new downtown hotel, The Porter.

The Willamette Week covered 6 cities that are “smarter than Portland about housing.”

A 200 bed shelter at 320 NW Hoyt St is inching forward, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Oregonian wrote about a city council vote on whether to subsidize affordable housing at Riverplace Parcel 3. Later that day the council voted 4-0 to move forward with the development.

Mayor Wheeler ousted the director of the Portland Housing Bureau, Kurt Creager.

BikePortland wrote about the Portland Art Museum’s return in front of city council, in order to ask permission to modify an easement and allow construction of the Rothko Pavilion.

Weekly Roundup: 1177 NE 21st, Block 45, Rothko Pavilion, and more

The under construction building at 1177 NE 21st Ave was designed by Hacker architects for PHK Development

OPB reporting on how Portland Art Museum is adapting plans for the Rothko Pavilion in order to win over critics.

According to the Oregonian the bidder that intended to purchase an Alaska ferry for use as a floating hotel at 2260 NW Front Ave has backed out of the deal.

The Willamette Week reported that Lents will get a new craft beer bar with food carts, in a currently under construction development at 9316 SE Woodstock Blvd.

The Hollywood Star News reported on the construction of a seven-story, 162-unit condominium project at 1177 NE 21st Ave.

The DJC published photos of the self storage building rising at 910 SE 7th Ave.

Prosper Portland, the agency formerly known as the Portland Development Commission, struggles to make money from the property it owns, writes the Oregonian.

Portlanders for Parking Reform wrote about how a project at 1717 SE Tenino St will include less affordable housing but more parking spaces, as a result of city regulations.

The NW Examiner looked at conflicting opinions of Pearl District residents regarding views of the Fremont Bridge that would be blocked by the Fremont Place apartment tower, which is currently going through design review.

The Portland City Council approved financing and transfer of the land for Block 45With all 240 units now planned to be affordable, the building will be city’s largest single building affordable housing development in 50 years.

The Portland Mercury reported on how the Republican tax plan would eliminate eliminate private activity bonds, a tool commonly used to fund affordable housing projects across the country.

The Willamette Week looked at a potential conflict between two of Governor Brown’s priorities, timber towers and clean air.

Weekly Roundup: Flatiron, Meier & Frank, Riverplace, and more


Construction is underway on Works Progress Architecture’s Flatiron Building

The DJC published photos of Flatiron, the under construction office building at N Mississippi & Cook whose shape is “reminiscent of the iconic Flatiron Building in New York City“.

Portland Architecture wrote about two proposals for two developments with buildings far taller than currently allowed: Kengo Kuma’s Riverplace Redevelopment; and the William Kaven proposal for the Post Office Redevelopment.

The Oregonian reported that Oregon State University will occupy the second floor of the re-purposed Meier & Frank Building.

The Business Tribune reported that Portland-based ZGF Architects was named the #1 ranked firm for sustainability in the nation by Architect magazine.

Weekly Roundup: DeMuro Awards, Heartline, Housing Bond, and more

Mason Erhman Annex / Zellerbach Paper Company Building

The seismic strengthening of the Mason Ehrman building and the concurrent renovation of the annex was given a DeMuro Award by preservation advocacy group Restore Oregon.

Eater Portland reported that Bamboo Sushi sister-restaurant Quickfish Poke Bar will open a second location next year in Heartlinethe Pearl District building formerly known as Block 136.

The Portland Mercury wrote about the Moxy Hotel, the 11 story building which would replace a portion of the 10th & Alder food cart pod.

Regional government Metro is weighing a 2018 bond measure to raise money to build affordable housing, reports the Oregonian.

Restore Oregon announced the winners of its annual DeMuro Awards for excellence in preservation, adaptive reuse, and community revitalization. Projects in Portland that received honors include the Swift Agency Headquartersthe Mason Ehrman Annex and Tower Seismic Strengthening and the Overland Warehouse.

As Portland moves closer to a mandatory seismic retrofit policy for unreinforced masonry buildings, the Portland Mercury reported that affected building owners are asking to be exempted from the city’s mandatory relocation payment law.

Weekly Roundup: Blackburn Building, Post Office Towers, PCC Bond, and more

A proposal for the Post Office site in the Pearl could include up to 5 million square feet of development

Without waiting for an answer from Amazon, Portland moved forward with a Request for Qualifications aimed at developers interested in the Post Office Site. Shortly afterwards architecture firm William Kaven unveiled designs for two towers of up to 970′ on the Pearl District propertywhich would rise to a height over twice the 400′ limit recently approved by city council.

The DJC looked at the Albina Vision, a plan for the Rose Quarter which would see it become more than just an entertainment district.*

The Oregonian looked at the OMSI Masterplan, which could be Portland’s next big waterfront development. The paper also revealed that the James Beard Public Market is still looking at the possibility of locating on the site.

Voters approved a $185 million Portland Community College bond, which will be spent on a renovation of its workforce training facility in the Cully and an expansion of the health technology building at its Sylvania campus.

The DJC published construction photos of the Asian Health & Service Center, currently taking shape in Lents.

Central City Concern broke ground on the Blackburn Building, previously known as the Eastside Health Center, at 25 NE 122nd Ave. The building will include housing and medical services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

The Bureau of Development Services is building an $800,000 communications team, reports The Oregonian.

BikePortland reported that Portland Art Museum is getting ready to unveil new plans for the Rothko Pavilion, after facing opposition to an early iteration of the design.

Despite plans for NAYA Generations to provide a place for Native American seniors and foster families to live, the development doesn’t currently house a single foster family, reported the Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported on the high-end historic buildings that benefit from $8 million a year in tax breaks.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Jupiter Hotel Expansion, ROSE/APANO Mixed Use, Amazon HQ 2, and more

A ground breaking ceremony was held for SERA Architects’ ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use Development at SE 82nd & Division. The building will include 48 residential units and commercial space.

Eater Portland reported that Dig A Pony co-owners have announced a new bar inside the Jupiter Hotel Expansion.

The Oregonian looked at Portland’s proposal to Amazon for its second headquarters project. Sites identified as available for development include the Post Office Site and the Ankeny Blocks.

Taller buildings in downtown Portland were called “inevitable” in a KATU report.

The first tenants for the Field Office have been announced, reports The Oregonian. The Children’s Garden and marketing agency Adpearance will move into the development, currently under construction on NW Front Ave.

Weekly Roundup: N Williams and Knott, OMSI Masterplan, Fair-Haired Dumbbell, and more

OMSI Masterplan

The OMSI Masterplan by Snøhetta and Mayer/Reed recently went in front of the Design Commission

The DJC reported that development at N Williams and Knott will wait a little longer* as a Prosper Portland oversight committee scrutinizes plans for the property.

Portland Architecture reported on the winners at the 2017 AIA Portland Architecture Awards. Projects in Portland that received prizes included the Japanese Garden Expansion and Pearl West.

The OMSI Masterplan could involve re-aligning SE Water Avenue and adding a two-way cycle track, according to BikePortland.

City Observatory noted that “‘For Rent’ signs are popping up all over Portland, signaling an easing of the housing crunch and foretelling falling rents.”

“With its wildly colorful artist-painted exterior, the Fair-Haired Dumbbell gives Portland a reason to smile,” according to an article in the Business Tribune.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: 250 Taylor, Lloyd West Anchor, Eastside Office, and more

525 SE MLK

The Eastside Office at 525 SE MLK will be framed with mass timber

The Willamette Week broke the news that Live Nation plans to open a concert venue in the Lloyd West Anchor building, formerly home to Nordstrom.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how “Portland’s anti-McMansion compromise is filling in details and nearing a final vote.”

NW Natural will move from Old Town into the 250 Taylor office building in 2019, reports the Portland Tribune.

The Portland City Council approved a resolution outlining priorities for how the $258 million housing bond should be spent, according to the Oregonian.

According to the Portland Tribune the city council will this week review a map showing any potential conflicts held by members of the West Quadrant Plan Stakeholders Advisory Committee. The plan, adopted by council in 2015, informs the larger Central City 2035 Plan currently before council.

The Business Tribune wrote about two cross-laminated timber buildings being designed by Hacker, including the Eastside Office at 525 SE MLK.

As the Portland area sets itself up as a center for mass timber construction, the Business Tribune asked what is it, and where can we see it?

As Adidas gets ready for a major expansion in Portland, the Oregonian sat down with executive Mark King to discuss the sportswear company’s future plans.

Weekly Roundup: Riverplace Redevelopment, Cook Security Group HQ, 7 Dees, and more

Riverplace Redevelopment

The Riverplace Redevelopment would include towers of up to 400′ tall.

The Willamette Week broke the news of the potential Riverplace Redevelopment, which could include 2,500 units, with 500 of them priced to be affordable for people making 80% of area median income. The project is being designed by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma & Associates and Portland-based GBD Architects. To move forward the project will require the support of the Portland City Council for an increase in the allowable heights on the site. Mayor Wheeler has confirmed he supports the development.

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the Cook Security Group HQ at 9225 NE Cascades Parkway.

The NW Examiner wrote about the Fremont Place apartment development, and how it will affect views of the Fremont Bridge from the Fields Park.

The 7 Dees garden center at 6025 SE Powell is set to be redeveloped as a 3-story self-storage building, reports the Portland Tribune.

Portland Architecture spoke to Hennebery Eddy Architects founder Tim Eddy on the occasion of the firm’s 25th birthday.

In the past 10 years, the City of Portland has collected $390 million in Systems Development Charges paid by developers, writes the Business Tribune.