Weekly Roundup: Vibrant!, Gladys McCoy, Providence Park, and more

NW 14th & Raleigh
The 93-unit Vibrant! development at NW 14th & Raleigh has opened. The building includes 40 units dedicated to formerly homeless individuals and families, with the rest of the 93 units available to those earning 30, 50 and 60 percent of area median income.

The 12-story Vibrant! affordable housing development opened in the Pearl*, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The quarter block tower was designed by Salazar Architect and LRS Architects for Innovative Housing Inc.

Multnomah County celebrated the opening of the Gladys McCoy Health Department Headquarters.

The Portland Timbers website published “Soccer and Witchcraft“, an interview architect Brad Cloepfil of Allied Works about designing the Providence Park Expansion.

A dedication ceremony was held for the skybridge which connects the OHSU Center for Health and Healing South to the original building, reports the Portland Business Journal. The bridge is dedicated to former OHSU patient Rhoni Wiswall, who passed away from pancreatic cancer.

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Weekly Roundup: Lexus Dealership, Block 76 West, De La Salle North Catholic High School, and more

Block 76 West
Block 76 West is under construction at the Burnside Bridgehead. The building will include retail space at the lower floors and office space above.

The International Mass Timber Conference is coming to Portland this week, reports the Business Tribune. The keynote speaker will be Paul Williamson, Managing Director, Modular Housing for Swan Housing in the UK.

The Burnside bridgehead building boom* continues with Block 76 West, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce. The five-story mixed-use building is being framed with Cross-Lamintated Timber, which has resulted in time savings of “several months”.

The Residential Infill Project, which would re-legalize duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes on almost all lots in Portland, passed the Planning and Sustainability Commission on Tuesday. Earlier in the week the Oregonian had reported on questions about how many new units of housing the project will deliver, and where in the city they will be built.

De La Salle North Catholic High School has found a new home at the southeast corner of NE 42nd and Killingsworth, reports The Skanner. A signed letter of intent give the school “a 50-year lease with two 25-year extensions.”

A large Lexus Dealership is coming to 3075 NE Sandy Blvd, reports KGW. The four story building will include an independent coffee shop on the ground floor with more showroom space on the second and third floors.

KATU reported that advocates for renters say developer behind the Norway I & II apartments at 6770 N Maryland Ave and 6780 N Maryland Ave is “using affordable [a] housing law loophole“.

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Metro Reports: Joe Etzel Field, 5115 SE Woodstock, 4931 NE 33rd, and more

A building permit is under review for the renovation of the University of Portland’s Joe Etzel Field.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers 
March 4th to March 10th, 2019.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at5115 SE Woodstock Blvd:

Project consisting of a 30 unit 4 story wood framed apartment building. The stormwater will be piped to drywells per SW-180 that will allow the water to infiltrate into the soil on site

Early Assistance has been requested by Atelier Siletz Architecture for a project at 526 SE 128th Ave:

Construct 2 new 3-story, wood framed, apartment buildings, to contain 14 units; a total of 28 units for the entire project (8 studios, 20, 1-bedrooms). There will be +/-5 new parking spots in front of the existing house, the exisitng house is to remain. There will also be a new 6′ walkway from the front of the property to the new buildings

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 4931 NE 33rd Ave:

Rehab of existing building and construction of new, mixed use commercial building in vacant lot. Leave existing building stormwater system unchanged. Stormwater for new lot to be handled onsite.

Early Assistance has been requested by HBX Studio Architecture for a project at 6221 SW Hood Ave:

Exploration of future development options, with the aim of maximizing development of the site. All stormwater to be handled on site

The University of Portland Joe Etzel Field renovation has been submitted for building permit review by SRG Partnership:

New seating and amenities for Joe Etzel field to include: press box, concessions, seating and restrooms. Meeting room, associated sitework and new landscaping between chiles center and stadium

Building permits were issued to Brett Schulz Architect for the Norway I & II apartments at 6770 N Maryland Ave and 6780 N Maryland Ave (previously 1340 N Dekum St):

New 3 story 15 unit apartment building to include 5 dwelling units per floor

New 3 story 15 unit apartment building to include 5 dwelling units per floor

Weekly Roundup: 5 MLK, Powellhurst Place, Garden Park Estates, and more

5 MLK
The concrete work at 5 MLK is expected to be complete in September. The 200′ tall building will include approximately 112,000 sq ft of office space, 220 residential apartments and 14,000 sq ft of retail space.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about construction of 5 MLK, the latest piece of the Burnside Bridgehead puzzle.*

The City Council will vote this summer on whether to expand bicycle parking requirements for new development, writes the Willamette Week.

The Portland Housing Bureau announced funding for two affordable developments in East Portland, totaling 126 new units. Powellhurst Place at 5403 SE 122nd Ave will consist of 65 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The 63 apartments at the Garden Park Estates at 3124-3234 SE 136th Ave will be rehabilitated or completely replaced, with 61 new apartments added.

Governor Brown signed the nation’s first statewide rent control law, reports the Oregonian. The law, which comes into effect immediately, caps rent increases in units over 15 years old at 7 percent plus inflation.

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Metro Reports: PAE Living Building, Lloyd East Anchor, Dekum Apartments East and West, and more

Lloyd Center owner Cypress Equities is now proposing a revised concept for the east end theater addition to the mall. Instead of incorporating the Sears building into the new cinema, as originally proposed, a taller cinema will be built to the south of the Sears anchor building. The Sears building will be retained and renovated into an office building.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers February 18th to February 24th, 2019. 

Early Assistance has been requested by Allusa Architecture for a project at 1535 NE 41st Ave:

16 unit apartment building in the Hollywood Pedestrian District, CM3d zone. Lobby with mail area on the first floor with interior long term bike parking in the back of the structure.

Early Assistance has been requested to discuss alterations to the previously approved project at 1339 NW 19th Ave:

Add 19 units to the project resulting in a total of 126 units. Exterior design modifications to the building’s exterior. See LU 17-111569 DZM

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled to discuss a revised concept for the Lloyd East Anchor:

The redevelopment of the East end of the Lloyd Center will be composed of two major projects. 1. Renovate and expansion of the existing 145,000 sf anchor building (former Sears). 2. Construction of a 70,000 sf theater building containing 13 theaters.

A project at 2148 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd has been submitted for a Type II Historic Resource Review by Ankrom Moisan Architects:

29,000SF 2-story brick office building to be the headquarters for Harder Mechanical Contrators. Building is on the Southeast corner of MLK and Thompson. Private surface parking to the east/behind the building with enterance off of Thompson. Site is non-contributing to the Eliot Conservation District.

The PAE Living Building has been submitted for a Type III Historic Resource Review by ZGF Architects:

The project consist of a 54,000 gsf, 5-story core and shell office building in the historical district, at SW 1st Ave and SW Pine St. The building house PAE’s Portland office and other tenants. It includes retail spaces ata the ground floor.

A project at 6306 N Maryland Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

Build 3 story 18 units apartment building. Mechanical separate.

A building permit was issued to Architecture Building Culture for the Dekum Apartments East at 577 NE Dekum St (previously 533 NE Dekum St):

New 4 story, 22 unit apartment building, includes associated sitework

A building permit was issued to Architecture Building Culture for the project at Dekum Apartments West at 505 NE Dekum St (previously 6800 NE Grand Ave):

New 4 story, 22 unit apartment building, includes associated sitework

A building permit was issued to EPR Design for a project at 1270 N Wygant St (previously 4735 N Minnesota Ave):

New 3-story 9 unit apartment building with trash room and bike room;with associated site work.

Weekly Roundup: 1715 NW 17th, Culinary Corridor, Weatherly Building, and more

The former Premier Gear & Machine Works building is being converted to creative office space by LRS Architects and Sturgeon Development Partners.

With the pending construction of Block 216 set to displace the 10th and Alder food carts, the city is studying the possibilities for a ‘Culinary Corridor’*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how an old gear and machine works factory at 1715 NW 17th Ave will become some of Portland’s newest creative office space.

The Oregonian wrote about the 12-story tower proposed adjacent to the Weatherly Building.

The proposal to re-legalize duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes throughout Oregon could be undermined by existing private deeds that prohibit anything other than single family homes, writes the Oregonian.

Senate Bill 10, sponsored by Senate President Peter Courtney, would require cities to allow dense development along major transit routes, writes the Oregonian. Portland would be required to allow up to 75 units per acre with a quarter mile of frequent transit, and up to 45 units per acre within a half mile.

Property magnate Greg Goodman objects to Multnomah County’s proposed $4.3 million purchase of a building at 333 SW Park Ave, according to the Willamette Week.

BikePortland asked whether the Oregon Department of Transportation’s I-5 Rose Quarter plan is compatible with the Albina Vision. In the Business Tribune architecture critic Brian Libby argued for making the vision a reality.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Andrea Durbin, executive director of the Oregon Environmental Council, is set to be the new director of the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

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Weekly Roundup: Weatherly Building, The Redd, Residential Infill, and more

Weatherly Building
A new 12-story office building designed by Perkins+Will is proposed adjacent to the Weatherly Building, as part of a project that will also include the seismic retrofit of the 1927 landmark stucture.

A 12-story mixed-use office and retail building at 510 SE Morrison St, adjacent to the Weatherly Building, has been proposed by developer Unico. At an initial Design Advice meeting the Landmarks Commission “recommended changes to the building’s massing, materials and height“*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Oregonian reported that Portland is drafting new historic preservation rules intended “to wrest back local control“.

The second phase of the The Redd will completely open on March 2, according to a story in the Business Tribune.

NBP Capital has acquired the former Sunshine Dairy site at 801 NE 21st Ave, writes the Portland Business Journal (subscription required). An Early Assistance application was submitted in January for a 7-story building with 300-350 residential units.

Neighborhood activists thought the Residential Infill Project would protect neighborhoods from McMansions, but “did not see the fourplexes on the horizon“, writes the Portland Tribune. The project, which will go in front of City Council this summer, is seeing the strongest opposition in neighborhoods that “tend to be more affluent and the least affected.”

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Weekly Roundup: Hallock-McMillan Building, Beatrice Morrow, the Hoxton, and more

Hallock-McMillan Building
Work has started on the restoration of the Hallock-McMillan Building. Design work for the restoration is being led by Emerick Architects, for building owner Russell Fellows Properties.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the rehabilitation of the Hallock-McMillan Building. The city’s oldest commercial building is “receiving a major renovation intended to restore the look and feel of the original brick masonry and cast iron.”

The Willamette Week reported that months after completion the Beatrice Morrow, an affordable housing development on NE MLK, was mostly empty despite applications from more than 1,500 people.

Portland Architecture spoke to Surround Architecture’s Mark VanderZanden and Ennismore’s Chris Stringfellow about how the old Grove Hotel became The Hoxton.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter and navigation center, reports the Portland Tribune.

Weekly Roundup: OHSU Schnitzer Campus Block 6, PAE Living Building, Holden of Pearl, and more

Block 6 will be the next part of the OHSU Schnitzer Campus to be built out. The building will front onto SW Bond Ave, which is currently under construction.

The Portland Business Journal reported on the OHSU Schnitzer Campus Block 6, which form the next phase of the hospital’s South Waterfront development (subscription required). The hospital intends to build a $75 million parking structure with 1,200 spaces. The Portland Housing Bureau and a developer will fund the construction of a $40 million 121-unit affordable housing component.

The PAE Living Building proposal for Old Town drew praise* from the Historic Landmarks Commission, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Oregonian wrote about the Holden of Pearl, the senior living tower proposed in the Pearl District.

Craig Cheek of the Portland Diamond Project spoke to the Oregonian about the baseball stadium, ticket prices and state bonds.

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Weekly Roundup: 230 Ash, Everett House, Historic Hotels, and more

SW 3rd & Ash
230 Ash is currently under construction in Old Town, and will include 133 residential units over ground floor retail.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about an “exciting time” for 230 Ash, the first of the Goodman family’s ‘Ankeny Blocks’* to be developed. The project is currently being framed, and is expected to be complete in October.

The Willamette Week wrote about a “beloved urban hot tub oasis” that is now under threat, now that the parking spaces it leased at 2821 NE Everett St is being redeveloped into a 118-unit apartment building.

Mayor Wheeler supports Speaker Kotek’s proposal to end the ban on duplexes, triplexes and fourplexes in Oregon cities of over 10,000 people, writes the Willamette Week. He also offered “measured support” for the tenant protections and rent control bill proposed.

The Business Tribune wrote about the Hoxton Hotel and Woodlark Hotelfind authenticity and ambiance in historic architecture“.

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