Weekly Roundup: Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Residential Infill Project, $250 million housing bond and more

Image of a potential "north end party deck" at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Image of a potential “north end party deck” at Veterans Memorial Coliseum, identified as one of the potential improvements by the 2015 study into the building.

Veterans Memorial Coliseum was declared a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Described by Curbed in article about the designation as “one of the finest International-Style civic buildings in the west”, the fate of the building remains unclear. A report published last year identified a number of options for the building, ranging from demolition to major improvements, however the Portland City Council has yet to take any action on the report.

As work on the Residential Infill Project wraps up, the Oregonian reported that Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is readying their recommendations for changes to the Zoning Code. Developers “would be required to reduce the scale of homes they build in Portland’s single-family zones and would be allowed to construct more duplexes, triplexes and other forms of so-called ‘middle housing’.”

The Portland Chronicle reported on the ten story building at 1500 SW Taylor St, likely to replace the 1892 Holman House in Goose Hollow.

BikePortland broke that the news that Tesla Motors will build a missing section of the Willamette Greenway Trail, as part of their new showroom and repair center at 4330 SW Macadam. Initial plans submitted to the City indicated that they would not build the trail.

The Portland Development Commission will own a new mixed income building in Lents Town Center at 9101 SE Foster Rd. The public agency is taking over development from the original owner, Williams & Dame.

The City Council is getting ready to ask voters to approve a $250 million bond measure, to fund affordable housing. If approved, the measure would add $75 a year to the taxes owed on a typical single family home.

Central City Concern published a blog post about their current affordable housing developments. Miracles Central is scheduled to open in August of this year, with the Hill Park Apartments at 110 SW Arthur following in Spring of 2017.

Bloomberg wrote about D.R. Johnson, the Riddle, OR company that is the first domestic manufacturer of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) panels. CLT is new to the United States, but has a long history of use in Europe. Current CLT projects in Portland include Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

KGW had a sneak peak inside the nearly complete Yard tower at the Burnside Bridgehead.

The Oregonian reviewed a Portland Art Museum exhibition about Portland-based Allied Works Architecture.

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