Weekly Roundup: Troy Laundry, Tree Farm, Westwind Apartments, and more

Plans presented to the Historic Landmarks Commission today show a renovation of the Troy Laundry building, and a new 6-story residential building built on the northern half of the block.

The Oregonian wrote about plans from Chicago-based developer AJ Capital Partners for the Troy Laundry building at 1010 SE Ash St. The renovated building might include a location of the private members club Soho House.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about buildings being planned with greenery on the exterior,* including Tree Farm in the Central Eastside and the new Westwind Apartments in Old Town.

Construction of new housing in Portland is still falling short of the need, reports Willamette Week.

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Weekly Roundup: Westwind Apartments, Sandy 28 and Tanner Point

The new Westwind Apartments, designed by Works Progress Architecture and Architecture Building Culture, will include 100 new deeply affordable SRO and studio units.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the new Westwind Apartments, which the Design Commission had a first look at last week*.

The Portland Chronicle checked in on the Sandy 28 Apartments, where a single house was replaced by 206 units.

An “Italy-meets-Portland food hall, neighborhood hub, and marketplace” named La Cooperativa is planned at the ground of Pearl District office building Tanner Point, reports Portland Monthly.

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Weekly Roundup: Scott Edwards HQ, PSU Science Building One, Nesika Illahee, and more

Architecture firm Scott Edwards will expand its existing headquarters on East Burnside.

Local tech entrepreneurs Christine and David Vernier have given Portland State University $4.5 million to support a major renovation of Science Building One, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland City Council was given an update on the Broadway Corridor last week. The Portland Business Journal wrote about the Healthy Communities Coalition’s efforts to ensure social benefits, including wage standards and diversity. The Oregonian reported that Portland Parks and Recreation will soon develop the block in front of PNCA, as a first step in the extension of the North Park Blocks.

OPB wrote about Nesika Illahee, a first of its kind affordable housing development for Native Americans that opened last week.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about architecture firm Scott Edwards’ plan to expand its headquarters* at 2525 E Burnside St so that it can fit all of its staff in one location.

Apple plans to take space ($) in the recently completed 7 Southeast Stark, reports the Portland Business Journal.

The Oregon Court of Appeals has upheld a ruling that Portland officials to need better justification for allowing 200′ tall buildings in parts the Chinatown-Japantown historic district, reports the Oregonian.

Hotels near the Block 216 construction site are handing out earplugs to their guests, reports Willamette Week.

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Weekly Roundup: Artists Repertory Theatre, Morningstar at Laurelhurst, Harbor Apartments, and more

If the Artists Repertory Theatre is able to meet their fundraising goals they will be able to start construction on a remodel of their Goose Hollow home this spring.

Refinements to the design of the Morningstar at Laurelhurst are needed before it can be approved*, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Oregon Arts Watch wrote about how arts groups are playing the real estate game. With half of their site in Goose Hollow sold to make way for the ART Tower, the Artists Repertory Theatre is planning a remodel of their building.

Willamette Week reported that the Oregon Harbor of Hope, the group behind the River District Navigation Center, has announced plans to develop affordable housing. The 153-unit Harbor Apartments will be built on a site at 148th and Burnside, purchased from the Northwest Baptist Network.

The Portland Art Museum announced a $10 million gift from philanthropist Arlene Schnitzer, reports OPB. The gift will help fund construction of the Rothko Pavilion, which will create an above ground link between the two wings of the museum.

Portland Architecture published the third article in a series about the best architecture of the decade, focusing on apartments, condos and affordability.

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Weekly Roundup: Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building, Residential Infill Project, Portland Public Schools, and more

Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building
A new skybridge would extend over SW 6th Ave, linking the existing Terwilliger Plaza building to their proposed Parkview Building.

The Recommend Draft of the Residential Infill Project had its first hearings in front of City Council last week. Advocates asked City Council to go further, and create options for six-plexes and eight-plexes if they are affordable, writes OPB.

A proposal for a skybridge that will link Terwilliger Plaza to their new Parkview Building received a thumbs up from the Design Commission*, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The final decision on the skybridge will be made by City Council.

Portland Public Schools wants to remake three high schools, writes the Oregonian. Initial concepts have been developed for Wilson High School, Jefferson High School and Cleveland High School.

Portland Architecture published the second part in a series about the best architecture of the 2010s.

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Weekly Roundup: Best Architecture of 2010s, Hyatt Place, Multnomah County Courthouse, and more

Multnomah County Central Courthouse
Construction at the Multnomah County Central Courthouse is scheduled to wrap up in spring 2020.

The passenger loading and drop off zone for the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences will not be placed on the future Flanders Bikeway, reports BikePortland.

The new Multnomah County Central Courthouse is nearing completion*, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly says she won’t vote for the Residential Infill Project without added tenant protections, reports Willamette Week.

Writing in the Business Tribune, Brian Libby discussed Portland’s best architecture of the 2010s.

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Weekly Roundup: Broadway Corridor, KEX Hotel, and the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The planned extension of NW Johnson St through the former post office site will include wide sidewalks and a two-way cycle track.

The long awaited Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center opened last week, reports the Oregonian. The new hotel includes 600 guest rooms and 39,000 sq ft of meeting areas.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about how NW Johnson will become the main street* of the Broadway Corridor.

The Portland Business Journal took a look inside the KEX Hotel, which brings a slice of Iceland to Portland’s Eastside.

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Weekly Roundup: Hyatt Place, Willamette Blocks, Lents Commons, and more

The Willamette Blocks proposal went in front of the Design Commission last week, but Commissioners found it was not yet ready to approve. The project will return in front of the Commission in February.

The proposed location for valet parking at the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences could interfere with the long-awaited Flanders Bikeway, writes Willamette Week.

Work still remains* before the Willamette Blocks proposal in South Waterfront can be approved, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

In a sizzling real estate market, city-owned storefronts have stood vacant for nearly two years at Lents Commons, reports Willamette Week.

Portland City Council voted unanimously last week to add exemptions to the Portland Clean Energy Fund, reports the Portland Business Journal. Businesses such as general contractors will no longer be classified as retailers, subject to the voter-approved gross receipts tax.

The Oregonian looked at who paid $6.9 million for a penthouse at the Cosmopolitan on the Park.

Weekly Roundup: RiverPlace Redevelopment, Byline, Lloyd Center, and more

The latest proposal for the RiverPlace Redevelopments includes more publicly accessible open space at street level.

Plans for the RiverPlace Redevelopment continue to evolve, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce. The eight acre site could include up to six high buildings, with offices, a hotel, senior living units, apartments and condominiums.

Three years after it was approved by the Design Commission, the lender pulled the plug on the Byline development at the Lloyd Cinemas parking lot—and demanded $36 million back, reports the Oregonian.

Willamette Week wondered whether the Lloyd Center will last another Christmas. Plans for the Lloyd West Anchor Redevelopment and East Anchor Redevelopment, which would replace the former Nordstrom and Sears spaces respectively, have yet to start construction.

The December issue of the Northwest Examiner wrote about the Unicorn Bed Apartments, an apartment development designed for single mothers, and new plans for the Northwest Children’s Theater on the site where the Modera Nicolai had previously been proposed.

Willamette Week reports that City Council will this week consider an ordinance that amends the definition of “retailer” so that it no longer includes businesses such as general contractors, who would otherwise be subject to the Portland Clean Energy Community Benefits Initiative.

The Planning and Sustainability Commission is proposing that Portland’s new Citywide Design Guidelines include language that encourages buildings to provide space to “rest and be welcome”—which could be interpreted to mean sleeping and pitching tents.

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Weekly Roundup: Tree Farm, KEX Portland, Portland Diamond Project, and more

Tree Farm
Trees are being installed at the Tree Farm building, currently under construction at SE 3rd & Morrison.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reports that strawberry trees have arrived at the Tree Farm office building, where they are being installed into 54 steel tree planters*, each of which weighs 2,200 lbs.

The Oregonian wrote about how Dottir, the restaurant at the KEX Portland, is bringing a taste of Reykjavik to Portland.

The Portland Diamond Project has a six month extension on their due diligence for the Terminal 2 site, reports OPB. The extra time will allow the group to study transportation options for the Northwest Portland site.

Portland officials drafted a policy to keep homeless people from camping outside popular event spaces, including the covered sidewalk at Providence Park, according to Willamette Week.

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