Weekly Roundup: Robert Sacks, Schools Bond, SolTerra, and more

A potential massing for a rebuilt Lincoln High School, by Bora Architects. Under this option the existing school would remain in operation while a new building is constructed where the football field is currently located.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools now plans to include complete modernization of three high schools, Lincoln, Benson and Madison, in its May 2017 bond measure.

In the wake of the NW Portland natural gas explosion, the DJC wrote about developer Robert Sacks’ plans to move forward*.  Allied Works Architecture, who designed the damaged building 2281 NW Glisan, are preparing drawings that will allow the building to be rebuild. They are also working on designs for a new three-story building building at 510 NW 23rd Ave to replace the 111-year-old building that was destroyed.

Places Over Time looked at the 2016 works of architecture and urban planning that have “creatively added to the livability, artistry, and longevity of Portland’s built environment“, including Albina Yard, Pearl West and Milwaukie Way.

A 100-bed winter shelter has opened in the Washington Center, reported The Oregonian. The building is currently sitting vacant while developer Greystar and architects ZGF prepares plans for the 4W Tower.

The Portland Chronicle reported that a 106-year-old apartment complex and automotive repair shop at 1335 SE Stark St will be torn down to make way for a four-story, 39-unit apartment complex.

The DJC reported that design-build firm SolTerra has split into two businesses and laid off design professionals.

The Business Tribune asked developers if they would still build housing in PDX under the inclusionary zoning policy.

The Portland Business Journal looked at the 34 most prominent real estate projects to watch in 2017.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

2 thoughts on “Weekly Roundup: Robert Sacks, Schools Bond, SolTerra, and more

  1. So the new apartment at SE 14th and Stark will have three times as many units as the existing one. Still, this is the first instance I’ve seen of an apartment being demolished to build another apartment. Most new apartments are built where parking lots, vacant lots, one story warehouses or bungalows once stood. Seems unnecessary to demolish existing apartments when inner SE contains no lack of surface parking lots, which are a total waste of close-in real estate. I’d rather see those get filled in first.

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