Weekly Roundup: Pepsi Blocks, Las Adelitas, Old Portland Holdouts, and more

Las Adelitas at 6723 N Killingsworth St, designed by Salazar Architect for Hacienda CDC, will include 140 units of affordable housing.

The infamous Sugar Shack strip club at in Cully will be demolished to make way for 140 units of affordable housing at Las Adelitas, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reports that the Portland is weighing a new strategy for how spend the funds from the 2016 affordable housing bond, following voter approval of Measure 102. The change could affect plans for 3000 SE Powell Blvd and 5827 NE Prescott St, two sites the Housing Bureau had intended to develop itself. The sites may now be turned over to outside affordable housing developers.

The Design Commission has approved the masterplan* for the Pepsi Blocksreports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The development could include up 1,297 units across the five acre site.

The Buiness Tribune wrote about four Old Portland holdouts, where new development surrounds existing buildings: the Field Officewhich wraps around the Dockside Saloon; Fire District No. 3, which formerly housed Touché and is now being incorporated in the Modera Glisanthe Dandy Warhols’ Odditorium, which sits on the remaining quarter block not occupied by the Broadstone Revealand the Auditorium Buildingwhich will be surrounded by 250 Taylor office building and the Hyatt Unbound hotel.

Portland Architecture interviewed Kyle Anderson of GBD Architects, whose projects include Hassalo on Eighth, Oregon Square and Block 216.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Hotel Cornelius, The Redd, Ankeny Lofts and more

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Hotel Cornelius Lobby (image via Portland Preservation). The interior no longer remains.

  • The Portland City Council held a public hearing on the proposed West Quadrant Plan, a component of the Central City 2035 Plan. The Oregonian had “10 takeaways from the 20-year plan for the westside.”
  • The Portland Design Commission this week reviewed Hazelwood Plaza and offered Design Advice on Modera Belmont.
  • Portland Monthly wrote about The Redd on Salmon St, an empty warehouse in the Central Eastside which the Ecotrust intends to convert into an “incubator for artisan food businesses.”
  • The Oregon confirmed that the adjacent Woodlark Building and Hotel Cornelius will be converted into a hotel operated by Provenance Hotels. A Pre-Application Conference for the project was held in December.
  • The Zipper, Guerrilla Development’s latest project, is taking shape on NE Sandy. The collection of micro-restaurants will open in March.
  • Major construction on the Lloyd Center Remodel begins in March. A story in the Oregonian said that brokers are shying away from traditional tenants, and are looking instead at “boutiques, restaurants, brewpubs, exercise studios and possibly a grocery store or a farmers market.”
  • Portland Architecture published photos of Colab’s recently completed Ankeny Lofts 2/3.
  • The 657-unit, three-building Hassalo on Eighth project will have a topping off ceremony on Monday, with Mayor Charlie Hales and Congressmen Earl Blumenauer present.
  • The Portland Chronicle published construction photos of Urban Development Group’s 27th & Ankeny project.
  • Randy Gragg asked whether the PNCA 511 Building will spark a renaissance in Old Town. The first students moved into the building this week.
  • The Portland Business Journal had a look at the under construction Erickson Saloon & Fritz Hotel project.
  • New Seasons has pre-leased 15,000 sq ft retail space in the Cook Street Apartments, to address a parking shortage at their North Williams store.
  • Hacienda CDC has a number of community projects in progress on the east side, including the Portland Mercado.

Under Construction on SE Foster: the Portland Mercado (images)

The Portland Mercado is under construction at SE 72nd and Foster. The project, by Hacienda CDC, will create a Latino themed food market, with approximately 20 vendors. An existing building will be converted into a market hall, with an associated commissary kitchen. A taproom will sell beers and wines from across Latin America. Outside, there is space for up to 8 food carts. The intent of the project is that it will also intended to function as a hub for Latino culture in Portland. According to a profile of the project in Portland Monthly, the inspiration for the project comes from Minneapolis’ Mercado Central.

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