Metro Reports: SW Park & Columbia, St Thomas More Catholic School, 7 Southeast Stark, and more

7 Southeast Stark

A Type II Adjustment Review has been submitted for 7 Southeast Stark, which is being developed by Harsch Investment Properties

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested by Fosler Portland Architecture for a project at 9628 SE Holgate Blvd:

Proposal is to construct 2 new multi-family units (2-3 units in each building). Phase 1 to be duplex. Phase 2 to be a triplex. Existing house to remain. Stormwater disposal to be flow thru planters.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project west of 11709 SE Powell Blvd:

Proposal for a tri-plex

7 Southeast Stark (previously 87 SE Stark St) has been submitted for Type II Adjustment Review by Works Progress Architecture:

Construction of a new mixed-use building (see CO 17-160571). Adjustment to loading standards (33.266.310) needed.

The rebuild of St Thomas More Catholic School at 3521 SW Patton Rd has been submitted for Type III Conditional Use Review:

For a proposal to rebuild the existing school facilities and parish hall at the St. Thomas More site at SW Humphrey and Greenleaf. A new 44-space parking structure, with school facilities above, is also proposed.

SW Park and Columbia has been submitted for building permit review by GBD Architects:

7 stories (5 over 2 construction) consisting of 73 dwelling units. Ground floor contains parking for 12 cars and 38 bikes, leasing office, a residential lobby, builidng services and 3 residential loft units. Floors 2-7 include 70 residential units, amenity room and roof terrace on the top floor

A project at 4726 SE Belmont St has been submitted for building permit review by Mentrum Architecture:

New 3 story, 12 unit apartment building with 56 S.F. Detached trash enclosure, includes associated sitework

A project at 915 N Killingsworth Ct has been submitted for building permit review:

New three story, 9 unit apartment building (no parking) associated site work and trash enclosure less than 120 sf ft – on same taxlot as existing SFR

A building permit was issued to Edge development for a project at 4305 N Montana Ave:

New 3 story apartment building with 10 units

Weekly Roundup: Hotels booming, Multifamily cooling, Schools bond and more

129 SE Alder

129 SE Alder is the latest creative office development in the Central Eastside

The Oregonian reported that Portland’s hotel boom—which includes the Cornelius-Woodlark, Canopy Hotel, Porter Hotel, AC Hoteland the Convention Center Hotel—will by 2020 result in 40% more hotel rooms than there are now.

The Willamette Week opined that “Portland City Hall seems to have learned its lesson about parking minimums raising rents” as the City Council struck down a proposal to add parking minimums for new residential development in the Northwest Plan District.

The DJC reported* that the Metro area multifamily market is beginning to cool as “after years of apartment development, supply appears to be starting to make a dent in demand”.

Harsch Investment Properties revealed a new creative office projected planned for 129 SE Alder St (previously 110 SE Washington St) to the Portland Business Journal. The design of the 9 story building is by Works Partnership.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools will seek voter approval for a $750 million construction bond in November. If passed, the bond would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Mill Creek Residential Trust paid Meriwether Partners $13.2 million for the former Premier Press building in the Pearl, a significant increase over the $6.05 million paid for the property in 2014. The transaction will allow the mixed use project at 505 NW 14th Ave to grow larger, at the expense of the now cancelled 1440 Hoyt office development.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Centennial Mills, 3rd & Taylor, Veritable Quandary and more

Centennial Mills

A sculpture park adjacent to the renovated Feed and Flour Mills was one of the options being explored for Centennial Mills by Harsch Investment Properties

With the fate of Centennial Mills uncertain, the Pearl District Neighborhood Association held a meeting to discuss the future of the site. Presenters included Jordan Schnitzer of Harsch Investment Properties, who had previously been selected as the developer for the property. The PDC allowed the memorandum of understanding between them and Harsch to expire in November, leaving open the possibility that all the buildings on site will be demolished. More information about the future of the property can be found at www.millmeeting.org.

Residents have started moving into the Union Apartments by GBD Architects, according to a story in The Oregonian.

Two historic buildings set to be demolished to make way for the 3rd and Taylor development have gained a temporary reprieve, according to the Portland Business Journal. The developers have agreed not to demolish the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple or the Hotel Albion until at least April 30. The developers made the agreement with advocacy group Restore Oregon, who in return withdrew their appeal to the Land Use Board of Appeals. A blog post at the Restore Oregon site states that “while the development team continues to assert that saving the buildings is not financially feasible, they have been engaging with Restore Oregon and others about options that could retain the Workmen Temple.”

A topping out ceremony was held for the 21-story Yard building, with 30 people in attendance including Congressman Earl Blumenauer. The Skylab designed project has been gaining a lot of attention lately due to the changes made between the design review process and the issuance of the project’s building permit. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that the situation could lead to changes to the City’s design review process in response.

The Oregonian reported that the restaurant Veritable Quandary will close this summer in order to make way for the new Multnomah County CourthouseThe County will demolish the restaurant building. The adjacent Jefferson Station building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, will remain.

The Willamette Week noted that Commissioner Steve Novick has called out environmental activists for  failing to make the case that bigger and more dense housing can reduce car use.

The Portland Chronicle wrote that an apartment project proposed at 2915 SE Division St would likely see the demolition of a 106-year-old home.