Weekly Roundup: Riverplace Redevelopment, Cook Security Group HQ, 7 Dees, and more

Riverplace Redevelopment

The Riverplace Redevelopment would include towers of up to 400′ tall.

The Willamette Week broke the news of the potential Riverplace Redevelopment, which could include 2,500 units, with 500 of them priced to be affordable for people making 80% of area median income. The project is being designed by Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma & Associates and Portland-based GBD Architects. To move forward the project will require the support of the Portland City Council for an increase in the allowable heights on the site. Mayor Wheeler has confirmed he supports the development.

The Business Tribune reported on the ground breaking for the Cook Security Group HQ at 9225 NE Cascades Parkway.

The NW Examiner wrote about the Fremont Place apartment development, and how it will affect views of the Fremont Bridge from the Fields Park.

The 7 Dees garden center at 6025 SE Powell is set to be redeveloped as a 3-story self-storage building, reports the Portland Tribune.

Portland Architecture spoke to Hennebery Eddy Architects founder Tim Eddy on the occasion of the firm’s 25th birthday.

In the past 10 years, the City of Portland has collected $390 million in Systems Development Charges paid by developers, writes the Business Tribune.

Weekly Roundup: Japanese Garden, PDX Commons, Viking Pavilion, and more

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

The Cultural Crossing at the Japanese Garden opened this past weekend.

Portland Architecture wrote about the wonder of Kengo Kuma’s Cultural Crossing at the Portland Japanese Garden.

The Business Tribune reported on the retirees developing the PDX Commons, four-story co-housing condominium on SE Belmont St.

The Rothko Pavilion at the Portland Art Museum would prohibit biking, limit walking access near South Park Blocks, according to BikePortland.

The DJC looked at how PSU is looking to score big* with the Viking Pavilion.

The NW Examiner broke the news that a proposal for music venue at 2034 NW 27th Ave, which would have had a capacity of up to 3,000, has been withdrawn.

Oregon Business reported on how more manufacturers are needed to jumpstart mass timber industry.

The Oregon Office of Economic Analysis argued that the housing recovery is still incomplete.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: the NV, Zidell Yards, Goat Blocks and more

The NV

The NV apartments in the North Pearl by ZGF Architects

The Business Tribune wrote about The NVone of the growing number of residential towers in the North Pearl.

Eater PDX reported that pizzeria Please Louise will be going into the ground floor of the LL Hawkins building in Slabtown.

Urban Land Magazine analyzed how the mix of uses at the Goat Blocks made the development possible.

The Oregonian broke the news that up to 67 windows will be added to the nearly complete Yard tower at the east end of the Burnside Bridge. The cost of the revisions will mostly be covered by the City of Portland, through fee refunds.

ZRZ Realty has hired Thomas Henneberry, “a longtime real estate consultant from the D.C. area” to oversee development of the Zidell Yards, according to the Portland Business Journal. The firm last year received design advice for Zidell Blocks 4 & 6though do not intend to break ground on the buildings until tenants are secured.

BikePortland had a look at the 600 space Lloyd Cycle Station, developed as part of the Hassalo on Eighth project.

The Oregonian reported on developer Gerding Edlen’s plans for a 17 story tower at 5 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. The building would replace the building that has housed Fishels Furniture for decades.

The Business Tribune checked in on the construction progress at the Japanese Garden ExpansionThe new cultural village by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma is expected to be completed in April 2017.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works founder Brad Cloepfil, in advance of a retrospective exhibition about the firm’s work at Portland Art Museum.

The Business Tribune looked at the ongoing restoration of the former Oregonian publishing building at 1320 BroadwayThe renovation is set for completion on June 30th.

New restaurant Q, the successor to Veritable Quandary, will be located in the 2&Taylor building, according to the Portland Business Journal. The former Yamhill Marketplace and Bally’s Total Fitness underwent a major renovation in 2014, and is now home to Jama Software.

The Willamette Week asked whether it is appropriate for the new 2035 Comprehensive Plan to downzone areas of East Portland in the middle of a housing crisis.

Eater PDX reported that Danwei Canting Chinese food pop-up is likely going into the under construction Central Eastside 811 Stark building.

Weekly Roundup: 21 Astor, Convention Center parking garage, Providore Fine Foods and more

The proposed garage at the Convention Center Hotel

The proposed garage at the Convention Center Hotel

The Portland Business Journal reported that the board of the Portland Development Commission approved a resolution to build a $26 million garage adjacent to Convention Center HotelThe 425-stall parking garage will include 375 stalls dedicated to the hotel. The majority of the remaining stalls will be used by Trimet.

The City is looking for feedback on the Central City 2035 plan, according to the Portland Business Journal. The new plan will rewrite the zoning code for Downtown, the Pearl, the Lloyd District and other areas of Portland’s Central Business District, and was released for public comment this week. Public displays will happen at the Development Services Center from February 22nd to 26th and at the Olympic Mills Building from February 29th to March 4th.

An opinion piece by three employees of ECONorthwest, a regional economic consulting firm, asked if Oregonians really want housing that’s affordable. The authors argued that the first order of business should be to bring the supply of housing into line with demand, and that there are three options to achieve this: build out, build up, or do both.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about the pros and cons of the vacation of a piece of right-of-way in St Johns known as “Ivy Island”. The vacation, which went before City Council this week for a first reading, will allow the Union at St Johns development to move ahead.

Developer Bob Ball has set up a new company, Robert Ball Companies, and is moving forward with a new building at 915 NW 21st Ave. The 21 Astor mixed-use building will include 27 apartments and 4,500 sq ft of ground floor retail.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the under construction Albina Yard office building. The four-story, 16,000 sq ft building is using Oregon fabricated Cross-laminated timber for its primary structure.

Portland Architecture wrote about the lecture and interview given by Kengo Kuma at Portland Art Museum. The Japanese architect is the designer of the new buildings currently under construction at the Portland Japanese Garden.

The Oregonian reported that Patrick Quinton, director of the Portland Development Commission, will step down this year after 5 years leading the agency.

Deconstruction has begun on two 1920s houses at NE 45th and Fremont, according to the Hollywood Star News. The project is the first commercial development so far to take advantage of Bureau of Planning & Sustainability offered incentives for deconstruction over demolition. The buildings will be replaced by the Bridgetown mixed-use development, which include 50 units of housing and 6,000 sq ft of retail.

After news broke about the Ankeny Blocks development last weekend, Food Carts Portland noted that the project could threaten the food carts at SW 5th and Stark, SW 3rd and Washington and SW 2nd and Stark. Journalist Michael Anderson replied with an article published on Medium titled “Chill, Portland: The downtown food carts are not about to close“.

The Willamette Week wrote that like the house in ‘Up’, the Dockside Saloon will live forever in a slot in the Field Office by Hacker Architects.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how the onsite sewer and stormwater treatment system at Hassalo on Eighth saved the developers $1.5 million in City levied development charges. The NORM system treats 100 percent of the grey and black water created by the three residential buildings, along with the Lloyd 700 Office building.

Providore Fine Foods opened this week on NE Sandy, with vendors that include Pastaworks, Flying Fish Company and Oyster Bar, The Meat Monger, Little T Baker, Rubinette Produce Market, Emerald Petals and Arrosto. Eater PDX published photos of the completed interior.

 

Japanese Garden releases details of Kengo Kuma designed expansion (images)

The Portland Japanese Garden has launched a capital campaign to support its planned expansion, which will include a series of new buildings by acclaimed Japanese architecture firm Kengo Kuma and Associates. The project will leave the existing garden undisturbed, and will add a new cultural village as well a new ticketing area. The expansion of Garden will be Kengo Kuma and Associates’ first public project in North America. The Japanese firm is being assisted by local architects THA Architecture and landscape architects Walker Macy.

Portland Japanese Garden Kengo Kuma

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