Weekly Roundup: Food Cart Block, Adidas Campus Expansion, Taylor Works, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion will include a building at N Delaware and N Sumner, and a relocated vehicular entry from N Greeley Ave

The Oregonian reported on plans to redevelop a site at 936 SW Washington Stcurrently home to Portland’s largest and best known food cart pod—with a 33-story tower, which would include office space, hotel rooms and apartments. The site is currently owned by the Goodman family, who the Daily Journal of Commerce reports have projects aplenty in progress.* Other current developments of theirs include 230 AshEleven West, and the Moxy Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal has the latest information on OMSI‘s ambitious Central Eastside expansion ambitions.

The Willamette Week covered the City’s annual State of Housing in Portland report, which includes some hope for struggling renters.

The Portland Business Journal reported that neighbors are opposing the Adidas Campus Expansion plans in North Portland. The Portland Design Commission has however shown early support for the proposal.

Portland Public Schools has “thrown a curveball” at the Portland Diamond Project‘s plans for an MLB stadium in the Rose Quarter, reports the Willamette Week. The Portland Business Journal reports that the group behind the project isn’t vexed by the proposed bidding process for the site.

The Urban Works Real Estate blog published construction updates on the Taylor Works Building at SE 2nd & Taylor, which is undergoing a major renovation and alteration.

The Business Tribune wrote about Continuum Partners, the developer that has been chosen to lead the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

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Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

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Weekly Roundup: Meyer Memorial Trust HQ, Adidas Campus Expansion, Old Town heights, and more

Old Town Chinatown Block 33

An earlier scheme for the redevelopment of Old Town Chinatown Block 33 was presented to the Landmarks Commission in January 2017. The same architecture and development team are now working on a revised proposal that would orient the mass on the western half of the block, where they are seeking an increase in allowable height.

The Oregonian reported that the Adidas Campus Expansion will more than double the size of the company’s North American headquarters.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the public forum where the three developers* who are vying for the Broadway Corridor Development Opportunity introduced themselves. The Related Companies, Continuum Partners and McWhinney are competing to be chosen as the master developer for the 32-acre site.

Portland City Commissioner Chloe Eudaly reversed her vote on height increases at the waterfront. The change will allow the Riverplace Redevelopment to move forward.

The Oregonian wrote about the debate at City Council over whether heights should be increased on Old Town Chinatown Block 33

City Observatory published an open letter on housing affordability to Portland City Commissioner Nick Fish, written by Portland State University Emeritus Professor Ethan Seltzer. An editorial in the Oregonian argued that the Portland City Council needs to reset its compass.

The Oregonian reported on high-rise apartment units rented as hotel rooms, including at The NV, Block 17 and Park Avenue West.

Portland Architecture interviewed GBD Architects’ Kyle Andersen & Phil Beyl about the firm’s 50 LEED projects (and counting).

A guest editorial in the Oregonian, written by Mark Edlen and Denis Hayes, argued that wood skyscrapers are coming and should be built with Forest Stewardship Council certified wood.

The Skanner News broke the news that the Meyer Memorial Trust, the state’s second largest foundation, plans to build a new headquarters at N Vancouver and Tillamook.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a tax break for the developments that voluntarily choose to include affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

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