Weekly Roundup: Albina Vision, 2505 NE Pacific, Tanner Creek Tavern, and more

An aerial view of the Albina Vision (labels by Bike Portland)

BikePortland took a look at the Albina Vision, a concept plan to restore the historic Rose Quarter neighborhood and put biking and walking first.

As the City Council held its first hearing on the Central City 2035 Plan, the Oregonian looked at 9 key changes proposed.

Seattle based Security Properties has closed on the 4.7-acre PepsiCo site at 2505 NE Pacific St, writes the DJC.  The developer is “is in the process of interviewing architects to begin conceptual design for the multiphase redevelopment”. With news of the development breaking, theOregonian asked if Sandy Boulevard is the next Hawthorne?

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at chef David Machado’s Tanner Creek Tavern, which opened this week in the Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites.

Core and shell work has wrapped up at the Towne Storage Building. The DJC published photos of the  renovated building, before construction begins on the tenant improvement for software company Autodesk.

Lastly, a note on the frequency of posts here at Next Portland. As some people have noticed the number of posts published has gone down a lot in the last couple months. This isn’t a reflection of there being less to write about; it’s just that Next Portland is written by just one person, in my spare time, and I haven’t had the ability to commit time to the site in recent months. As things are getting back to normal I hope to be able to return to the regular posting frequency. There are many large projects that I haven’t yet had a chance to write about, but which I think Next Portland readers will enjoy learning about.

Weekly Roundup: Makers Row, Workmen Temple, Franklin High School, and more

Makers Row, designed by Risa Boyer Architecture, will include both commercial space and 19 apartment units

David Machado’s Tanner Creek Tavern has set a September 12 opening date, reports the Portland Mercury. The restaurant will be located in the Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites.

Portland Architecture wrote about the “tragic” United Workmen Temple demolition. The building is currently being demolished to make way for the 3rd & Taylor office building.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at the $49 million Faubion Elementary School, built in partnership between Concordia University and Portland Public Schools.

Portland Architecture visited the modernized Franklin High School.

The Hollywood Star News reported Makers Row in Cully is “nearing completion, with occupancy expected to start in late August“.

The Oregonian took a look at Amazon’s new Portland office in the 1320 Broadway building.

Mayor Ted Wheeler has hired a housing policy staffer, after nearly eight months in office, according to the Willamette Week.

Weekly Roundup: Sandy Blvd, Sky3, St Francis Park Apartments, and more

St Francis Park Apartments

The recently completed St Francis Park Apartments.

With a potential large development planned at the Pepsi bottling facility at 2505 NE Pacific, the DJC asked if it is Sandy Boulevard’s moment?*

The Willamette Week reported that “one of the largest and most popular food cart pods in Portland”, located at 2880 SE Division St, is closing to become apartments.

The Portland Tribune looked at the push by homeless advocates to ensure affordable housing developments include Permanent Supportive Housing units, such as those at the recently completed St Francis Park Apartments.

According to the Oregonian, Amazon will be opening a pickup location near PSU in the ground floor of the recently completed Sky3 tower.

The Willamette Week reported that critics are blasting a “plan to divert money earmarked for the black community to help a health care giant” at N Williams and Knott.

According to the Portland Business Journal “no fewer than 27 hotels have either opened since 2015 or are under construction or planned for the metro region”. The paper published a gallery of the some of the hotel projects that are adding thousands of rooms to Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: PSU Karl Miller Center, Ankeny Apartments, 3000 SE Powell, and more

PSU Karl Miller

Construction is wrapping up on the PSU Karl Miller Center, designed by Behnisch Architecten and SRG Partnership

The DJC reported that Portland is considering a voluntary inclusionary housing program*, at a cost of $50 million over 10 years, designed to create affordable units in projects submitted prior to the city’s mandatory inclusionary housing program.

The Portland City Council voted to approve a revised design for the Ankeny Apartments, overturning an earlier denial by the Design Commission, writes the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about 5 business takeaways from Portland’s proposed Central City 2035 plan.

The Oregonian reported on plans to tear down a SE Portland strip club at 3000 SE Powell Blvd to build affordable housing.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler has been slow to deliver on promise of affordable housing, according to the Oregonian.

In an interview with the Willamette Week city council candidate Jo Ann Hardesty’s described the N/NE Portland Preference Policy as “most ludicrous, arrogant, obnoxious policy imaginable.”

The Business Tribune looked at the PSU Karl Miller Center, which is set to open in 6 weeks. The DJC published photos of the nearly completed building.

Portland Monthly wrote about how Providence Park is about to get a major expansion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: N Williams and Knott, Convention Center Hotel, Providence Park, and more

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

A ceremonial groundbreaking was held for the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The DJC wrote about how after decades of broken promises, Prosper Portland and Emanuel Hospital announced plans to redevelop a site at N Williams and Knott. According to the paper the project is “likely to include some use by Legacy Health, along with a mix of affordable housing, retail and possibly office space.”

After almost 30 years of plans, ground finally broke on the Convention Center Hotel, writes the Portland Business Journal.

In a cover story about how Portland is changing, the Willamette Week looked at 7 places where this city could soon go big.

The Design Commission last week approved the Providence Park Expansionaccording to the Oregonian.

City Observatory looked at how luxury housing becomes affordable, with historic examples in Portland.

With very few new projects submitted to-date under the city’s new inclusionary zoning ordinance, BikePortland looked at Urban Development Group’s plans to swap parking for affordable housing at 2548 SE Ankeny St, 316 NE 28th Ave and 2789 NE Halsey St.

The Portland Tribune reported on slips in the schedule for two city initiatives designed to tackle housing affordability: adoption of the Residential Infill Project, which is now delayed until late 2018; and spending of the voter approved affordable housing bond.

Weekly Roundup: 3000 SE Powell, Laurel 42, Lloyd Center, and more

Lloyd West Anchor Remodel

Work has wrapped up on the original scope of the Lloyd Center remodel, however future phases will now include repurposing the anchor building formerly occupied by Nordstrom.

The DJC reported that unreinforced masonry building owners are fuming over a mandatory seismic retrofit proposal*.

Portland For Everyone interviewed “Surly Urbanist” Jamaal Green about building a pro-housing political alliance.

The Business Tribune reported on a study that ranks Portland No. 21 out of 50 metro areas in terms of hardest cities to add necessary new apartments.

According to the Willamette Week, the Portland Housing Bureau will purchase a property at 3000 SE Powell Blvd, which could be developed into as many as 300 units of affordable housing.

Oregon could “lose $80 million a year in federal housing funding in the proposed White House budget”, writes the Oregonian.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about Laurel 42, the six story project with mechanical parking rising in Hollywood.

The Business Tribune reported that Pearl West, Portland’s first post-recession office building, has been sold by its developer to LaSalle Investment Management.

The Oregonian wrote about how the Lloyd Center Remodel is a lot bigger than originally planned. The new entry plaza and helical stair opened last week, but will be joined in the future by the West Anchor Remodel and East Anchor Remodel, where a new cinema will replace a portion of the space currently occupied by Sears.

The DJC published construction photos of the Field Officecurrently rising in Northwest Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Eleven West, Housing Bond, Office Development, and more

Eleven West is being designed by ZGF Architects, who also designed the nearby Twelve West tower

The Oregonian wrote about Eleven West, the 24-story tower with swimming pool planned for downtown Portland’s West End.

The Willamette Week wrote about how Mayor Wheeler has “blown past a deadline his own office set for starting to spend a $258 million bond approved by voters last November to build and rehab affordable housing units”.

Portland Architecture took a look at the offices of Stoel Rives and Simple, respectively located in Park Avenue West and Clay Creative.

The Portland Business Journal looked at how the Goat Blocks are bringing “new flair to a transforming neighborhood.”

An analysis by the Business Tribune showed that the real estate market in Portland is moving towards the construction of office space.

Weekly Roundup: Canopy Hotel, Oregon’s Development Spree, Best of Portland, and more

Canopy Hotel

Construction has topped out on the Canopy Hotel, designed by ZGF Architects

The Oregonian took a look at Oregon’s development spree, which include “21 cranes, 15 hotels [and] 10,000 jobs”.

Construction has topped on the Pearl District’s Canopy HotelThe DJC published photos of the progress to date.

Portland Architecture interviewed Brian Cavanaugh of Architecture Building Culture.

The Portland Business Journal looked at how the Goat Blocks are bringing “new flair to a transforming neighborhood.”

Next Portland came in third place for “Best Local Blog” in the annual Willamette Week “Best of Portland” Readers’ Poll. Thank you to everyone who voted for us.

Weekly Roundup: Jupiter Hotel, Jasmine Block, Neuberger Hall, and more

Jupiter Hotel

Construction is underway on the Jupiter Hotel expansion, designed by Works Progress Architecture.

The DJC wrote about construction progress* at the Multnomah County Central Courthousewhich is being built on the site of a former highway ramp.

The Oregonian wrote about the $5 million gift given to Portland State University, which will enable the Neuberger Hall Renovation to move forward.

Portland State University will receive $51 million in state bonds, writes the Portland Business Journal. The money will enable the Jasmine Block development at SW 4th & Montgomery to move forward.

The DJC published photos of the under construction Jupiter Hotel on E Burnside St.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Laurel 42, Fair-Haired Dumbbell, Portland Building, and more

Laurel 42

Laurel 42 by LRS Architects is being constructed at the corner of NE Halsey St and 43rd Ave

The Oregonian reported that the developers behind the Convention Center Hotel will break ground on the project on July 14th.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how the Fair Haired Dumbbell is coming to artistic life.

The Business Tribune covered the first historic review resource review hearing for the Portland Building.

The DJC reported on Laurel 42, the new mixed-use building coming to the Hollywood District*.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.