News Roundup: Collective Oregon Eateries, Ankeny Apartments, Alberta Alive!, and more

The Collective Oregon Eateries food hall is currently under construction.

The Black real estate developer behind the Ankeny Apartments claims he was discriminated against by Prosper Portland, reports Willamette Week.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the proposed Multnomah County Behavioral Health Center which will be a “sustainable project for a vulnerable population“.

Eater Portland wrote about the Collective Oregon Eateries (or CORE), the “huge new food cart pod coming to SE 82nd“. CORE will initially open as a food cart hub, with an indoor food hall to follow.

The Skanner wrote about Self Enhancement, Inc and Community Development Partners’ plans for the Alberta Alive! development, which will include 52 units of affordable housing split on NE Alberta St, split between sites at NE 8th and Alberta and NE Grand and Alberta.

Building on History wrote about the City Council hearing regarding the re-adoption of Central City 2035 and heights in the New Chinatown / Japantown Historic District.

The Business Tribune profiled the planned rebuild of the PCC Metropolitan Workforce Training Center which include a new building at the corner of NE 42nd and Killingsworth and 90 units of affordable housing on the site of the current building.

News Roundup: Oregon Square, Flatworks, Hallock & McMillan, and more

Two new office buildings at Oregon Square, designed by GBD Architects, would include 370,000 sq ft of new office space.

American Assets Trust is looking at building two new office buildings* on Blocks 90 and 103 of the Lloyd District’s Oregon Square, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. A previous proposal for the site was approved in 2015, but never broke ground.

Sturgeon Development Partners is planning an eight story cross-laminated timber office building in the Central Eastside, writes the Oregonian. Flatworks, located at 234 SE Grand Ave, is being designed by TVA Architects.

Building on History wrote about the “small miracle” of the restoration of the Hallock & McMillan on SW Naito Parkway.

The coronavirus is clouding the forecast for Portland Public Schools’ $1.4 billion bond campaign, planned for the November ballot, reports the Oregonian. If the district moves forward with the measure it would seek to fund the reconstruction of Cleveland High School, Jefferson High School and Wilson High School.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

News Roundup: Northbound 30 Collaborative, Gilkey International Middle School, ART Tower, and more

The Northbound 30 Collaborative will include eight five-story mass-timber apartment buildings, with a total of 144 units over the entire site.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the “variations on a theme“* planned by Waechter Architecture and Jones Architecture for the Northbound 30 Collaborative at 2123 NW 30th Ave.

Hotelier and former Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland is selling a parcel land at 320 NE Lloyd Blvd, reports the Oregonian. The property was acquired from Metro in 2016 as part of settlement to legal action related to the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center. A proposal in 2018 to build a music venue, commercial space and a 14-story residential tower on the site never moved forward.

Portland plans to readopt the Central City 2035 Plan—which is not currently in effect—with the same building heights in the New Chinatown / Japantown Historic District, writes Building on History.

Portland Architecture spoke to Dietrich Wieland and Rich Mitchell of Mackenzie, on the occasion of the 60th anniversary for the architecture, engineering and design firm.

Metropolis wrote about how Hacker Architects put the French American International School on the path to net zero carbon with its new Gilkey International Middle School building.

Portland Monthly wrote about three large projects that are reshaping Portland neighborhoods: the Pepsi Blocks, Block 216 and the ART Tower.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Workshop Blocks, Broadway Tower, Social Distancing, and more

Workshop Blocks
Block A of the Workshop Blocks, on the left, will be the first of three buildings planned for the vacant lots on SE Water Ave.

Beam Development is moving forward with the Workshop Blocks (formerly known as the ODOT Blocks), reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. Last week the board of Prosper Portland, who own the site, voted to authorize a 99-year ground lease*. Beam plans to build 100,000 sq ft of industrial office space on Block A, which will be first of three buildings planned.

The Business Tribune reported on how construction workers are grappling with social distancing.

Portland Architecture spoke to Emerick Architects, who recently celebrated 20 years in practice.

The office portion of the Broadway Tower was sold by its developer, BPM Real Estate, reports the Business Tribune.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Hyatt Regency, Hyatt Place, Portland Building, and more

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center
The Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center sold for $190 milion in December. It is currently closed, due to the COVID-19 crisis.

It’s been a month since we last published a ‘weekly’ roundup. The news in March was almost entirely focused on COVID-19, with few stories of the kind we normally link to published. This roundup mostly includes stories from last week, as well as a few that we missed in the previous weeks.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about SERA Architects’ slightly different proposal* for 306 SE 8th. While the project was approved in 2017, the approval will expire before construction can start.

Portland Architecture visited the reconstructed Portland Building, where the interior changes are so significant that “one can hardly believe this is the same place.” A grand re-opening ceremony that was scheduled for March 19th was canceled, according to the Business Tribune.

The Hyatt Place at the Oregon Convention Center sold in December for $190 million, reports Willamette Week. Despite public investment in the project, none of the profit returned to the taxpayer.

Construction is “chugging along like it’s still 2019,” reports Willamette Week, and “some workers say that’s dangerous“.

The Northwest Examiner wrote about the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences and, in something of a new concern for the paper, wondered whether “available building sites that could have been used for permanent housing will instead be reserved for tourists and business travelers“. The paper also reported that plans for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center have been canceled, with only a parking lot now set to be built at the site on NW St Helens Rd.

Willamette Week looked at why so many huge self-storage complexes have cropped up in Portland.

Portland Architecture visited Tree Farm, where they found that color and whimsy enliven and ordinary office.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Pepsi Blocks, Morrison Market, Inclusionary Zoning, and more

Pepsi Blocks Phase 1A
The first phase of the Pepsi Blocks will soon be submitted for building permit review, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. It’s one of the large developments that’s moving forward, at a time when fewer mid-size developments are happening.

Eater Portland wrote about the Morrison Market, the “mysterious new food hall in Southeast Portland“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce covered how costs are escalating for multifamily development*, with a resulting dip in production.

The City of Portland wants to bring in an outsider to see how effective inclusionary zoning has been since 2017 ($) reports the Portland Business Journal.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Troy Laundry, Tree Farm, Westwind Apartments, and more

Plans presented to the Historic Landmarks Commission today show a renovation of the Troy Laundry building, and a new 6-story residential building built on the northern half of the block.

The Oregonian wrote about plans from Chicago-based developer AJ Capital Partners for the Troy Laundry building at 1010 SE Ash St. The renovated building might include a location of the private members club Soho House.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about buildings being planned with greenery on the exterior,* including Tree Farm in the Central Eastside and the new Westwind Apartments in Old Town.

Construction of new housing in Portland is still falling short of the need, reports Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Westwind Apartments, Sandy 28 and Tanner Point

The new Westwind Apartments, designed by Works Progress Architecture and Architecture Building Culture, will include 100 new deeply affordable SRO and studio units.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the new Westwind Apartments, which the Design Commission had a first look at last week*.

The Portland Chronicle checked in on the Sandy 28 Apartments, where a single house was replaced by 206 units.

An “Italy-meets-Portland food hall, neighborhood hub, and marketplace” named La Cooperativa is planned at the ground of Pearl District office building Tanner Point, reports Portland Monthly.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Scott Edwards HQ, PSU Science Building One, Nesika Illahee, and more

Architecture firm Scott Edwards will expand its existing headquarters on East Burnside.

Local tech entrepreneurs Christine and David Vernier have given Portland State University $4.5 million to support a major renovation of Science Building One, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland City Council was given an update on the Broadway Corridor last week. The Portland Business Journal wrote about the Healthy Communities Coalition’s efforts to ensure social benefits, including wage standards and diversity. The Oregonian reported that Portland Parks and Recreation will soon develop the block in front of PNCA, as a first step in the extension of the North Park Blocks.

OPB wrote about Nesika Illahee, a first of its kind affordable housing development for Native Americans that opened last week.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about architecture firm Scott Edwards’ plan to expand its headquarters* at 2525 E Burnside St so that it can fit all of its staff in one location.

Apple plans to take space ($) in the recently completed 7 Southeast Stark, reports the Portland Business Journal.

The Oregon Court of Appeals has upheld a ruling that Portland officials to need better justification for allowing 200′ tall buildings in parts the Chinatown-Japantown historic district, reports the Oregonian.

Hotels near the Block 216 construction site are handing out earplugs to their guests, reports Willamette Week.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Artists Repertory Theatre, Morningstar at Laurelhurst, Harbor Apartments, and more

If the Artists Repertory Theatre is able to meet their fundraising goals they will be able to start construction on a remodel of their Goose Hollow home this spring.

Refinements to the design of the Morningstar at Laurelhurst are needed before it can be approved*, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Oregon Arts Watch wrote about how arts groups are playing the real estate game. With half of their site in Goose Hollow sold to make way for the ART Tower, the Artists Repertory Theatre is planning a remodel of their building.

Willamette Week reported that the Oregon Harbor of Hope, the group behind the River District Navigation Center, has announced plans to develop affordable housing. The 153-unit Harbor Apartments will be built on a site at 148th and Burnside, purchased from the Northwest Baptist Network.

The Portland Art Museum announced a $10 million gift from philanthropist Arlene Schnitzer, reports OPB. The gift will help fund construction of the Rothko Pavilion, which will create an above ground link between the two wings of the museum.

Portland Architecture published the third article in a series about the best architecture of the decade, focusing on apartments, condos and affordability.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.