Weekly Roundup: Hawthorne 31, Hi-Lo Hotel, High Schools, and more

The Hi-Lo Hotel, located in the Oregon Pioneer Building, is set to open at the end of the month. The building is also home to iconic Portland restaurant Huber’s.

Portland voters approved the $790 million Portland Public Schools bond, which will pay for the rebuild or modernization of Benson High SchoolMadison High SchoolLincoln High School and Kellogg Middle School.

At three and a half months into Portland’s Inclusionary Housing program, the Business Tribune looked at the policy’s success so far.

SE Hawthorne now has a second poke bowl restaurant, at the ground floor of the Hawthorne.31 Apartments, writes Eater PDX.

Demolition began on the former Club 21 building, reported the Portland Mercury. The site is being redeveloped as the Jantzen Apartments.

Portland Monthly looked at the Field Office, a “radical new Portland office [that] blends work and nature“.

The Hi-Lo Hotel and Alto Bajo restaurant will open May 31st, according to Eater PDX.

Weekly Roundup: ArLo Apartments, Franklin High School, 539 SW 10th, and more

ArLo Apartments

The ArLo Apartments by Fairfield Residential will be built on the site formerly home to Interstate Lanes, which closed last year.

The Willamette Week reported on a proposal for a hotel at 539 SW 10th Avea site currently currently occupied by food carts, including the original Nong’s Khao Man Gai.

OPB reported that Portland Public Schools gave a preview look at the remodeled Franklin High School.

The Business Tribune wrote about changes coming to Portland’s Design Review process, following City Council adoption of the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project Report.

Portland Art Museum has raised a $27 million for the Rothko Pavilion, according to the Willamette Week, despite the fact that it currently lacks the legal right to build the project.

House Bill 2007, which is intended to speed up the approval process for affordable housing, is running into neighborhood opposition, writes the Portland Tribune.

The DJC wrote about the growing pains of the North Pearl*.

As Portland grows bowling alleys are being squeezed out, reports OPB. The former Interstate Lanes are being redeveloped as the ArLo Apartments, while the AMF alley at 3031 SE Powell is set to be converted to a Target.

Portland Shoupistas wrote that Mayor Wheeler has said that the debate between parking and housing “is over“.

Lastly, Next Portland is a finalist for “Best Local Blog” in the Willamette Week’s Best of Portland Readers’ Poll.” If you enjoy our coverage of local architecture and development we’d appreciate your vote.

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Weekly Roundup: Providence Park, Karl Miller Center, Madison High School, and more

The proposed 4,000 seat expansion of Providence Park

The Portland Timbers released images of the Providence Park Expansion , which the Portland Mercury noted is “influenced by the iconic near-vertical stands at La Bombonera in Buenos Aires and the Shakespearean Globe Theater in London.”

The Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s 2017 State of the City Design Report.

The Oregonian wrote about how Oregon is pushing for wooden skyscrapers, including Carbon12 and Framework, to revive the state’s timber industry.

As the Portland City Council approved tax breaks for seven new buildings, in exchange for affordable housing, The Oregonian reported that Commissioner Nick Fish questioned whether the proposals go far enough. The exemptions were granted for Con-way Block 290, 2216 NW Pettygrove St, SW Park and Columbia, SW 3rd & Ash, The Atomic Orchard Lofts at 2520 NE Sandy Blvd, Old Town Chinatown Block 33, and Woody Guthrie Place at 5728 SE 91st Ave.

BikePortland reported that amid stiff opposition, the city council ordinance required for the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion was placed on hold.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how PSU is on the final stretch of work on the Karl Miller Centerthe expansion of renovation of the university’s School of Business Administration.

The Portland Tribune reported on an error by Portland Public Schools that resulted in the award of a design contract for the Madison High School Modernization to a firm that scored lower in the evaluation process.

Weekly Roundup: 1645 SE Nehalem, Tesla Showroom, Rothko Pavilion, and more

Construction of the Rothko Pavilion as currently proposed would require City Council permission to alter an existing pedestrian easement.

In “So many projects, too little time”, the DJC looked at the speed of Portland’s Design Review process*.

BikePortland took a look at the newly built trail adjacent to the planned Tesla Showroom at 4330 SW Macadam Ave.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the four-story self-storage building that’s coming to a site at 627 SE Division Place.

BikePortland reported that the city’s bicycle and pedestrian advisory committees have expressed opposition to the Portland Art Museum’s Rothko Pavilion.

The DJC published photos of the expanded Japanese Garden.

Portland Shoupistas reported that proposed changes to buildings planned at 1717 SE Tenino5965 SE Milwaukie and 1645 SE Nehalem—which would see 46 parking stalls removed from plans in favor of the addition of 40 affordable units—may not happen, due to the Bureau of Development Services’ interpretation of what counts as “frequent service” transit.

The Oregonian looked at whether Portland can build its way out of a housing crunch.

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Weekly Roundup: Ankeny Apartments, Makers Row, Old Fire Station, and more

Ankeny Apartments

The City Council heard the appeal for the Ankeny Apartments

The Business Tribune reported on the City Council’s deliberations over the appeal for the Ankeny Apartmentswhich were denied by the Design Commission earlier this year.

The DJC wrote about plans by the Portland Development Commission to rehabilitate* the long vacant Old Fire Station Property in Old Town Chinatown.

According to the Oregonian the 111-year old Chamberlain Hotel building, formerly home to Shleifer Furniture, will house a temporary homeless shelter while plans progress for its renovation into a hotel.

CityLab published an article about the Burnside Bridgehead, titled Portland’s Next Density Spurt, where projects such as Yard, Slate and the Fair-Haired Dumbbell are re-shaping the skyline.

Eater PDX reported that Japanese restaurant Kuu will open in Slate this summer.

The Hollywood Star News reported that the Makers Row development in Cully is nearing completion.

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Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

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Weekly Roundup: Hampton Inn, Custom Blocks, Garlington Center, and more

Custom Blocks

Interior of the Custom Blocks development, by developer Capstone Partners and architect Scott Edwards Architecture.

Eater PDX reported that chef David Machado will open Tanner Creek Tavern this summer in the Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites.

The Business Tribune looked at the transformation of the Goat Blocks.

Places over Time studied the past, present and future of the Lloyd Districtwhich is being transformed by developments such as Oregon Square, 1400 NE Multnomah, 1510 NE Multnomah and Block 45.

The Custom Blocks at 1340 SE 9th Ave and 925 SE Main St are the latest industrial buildings in the Central Eastside to be converted to creative office use. The Business Tribune looked at how the buildings are evolving.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the Garlington Center affordable housing / health care development has been awarded $4.5M in tax credits.

Oregon Business reported that Portland is getting ready to issue $9 million of bonds to fund future affordable housing projects, backed by revenues from short term rentals such as airbnb.

Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

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Weekly Roundup: Pearl East, 1725 SE Tenino, 5035 NE Sandy and more

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan, by Mackenzie

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan is currently being reviewed by the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission. According to the DJC the Commission appeared inclined to support the project*, but granted a request by a neighbor to extend the public comment period.

‘Portland For Everyone’ wrote about two buildings in Sellwood-Moreland, at 1707-1725 SE Tenino St and 5965-6003 SE Milwaukie Ave that could be the first buildings to include affordable housing through the Portland’s new Inclusionary Zoning ordinance. Though vested under the old code, the developer is exploring the option of removing the previously required parking spaces and adding affordable units.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about the new development at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd, on the site formerly home to der Rheinlander. The 32,000 sq ft building will include 24,000 square feet leased by Portland Clinic and 6,000 to 8,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

The Willamette Week wrote about how “early signs point to trouble for a record-setting Portland Public Schools bond“. If passed, the $790 bond would include funding to renovate Benson High School and Madison High School, and to raze and rebuild Lincoln High School and Kellogg Middle School.

Oregon Business published images of Portland’s “latest Insta-worthy hotel“, the AC by Marriott.

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Weekly Roundup: Custom Blocks, AC by Marriott, 4W and more

AC Hotel Portland

The AC by Marriott at SW 3rd & Taylor has opened.

The DJC broke the news* that the 4W tower at 419 SW Washington St is on hold as developer Greystar struggles to gain financing for the project.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about Portland’s latest creative office development: the Custom Blocks at 1340 SE 9th Ave and 925 SE Main St.

Portland Architecture sat down wtih Holst Architecture’s new owners to discuss the firm’s evolution.

The Rose City Park neighborhood association has weighed in on the proposed apartments at 5036 NE Sandy Blvd, reports the Hollywood Star News.

The Portland Chronicle reported that a demolition permit has been issued for the 1965 warehouse with the ‘Machine’ mural at 4018 N Williams Ave. The 5 warehouse will be replaced with a 5 story mixed use building with retail on first floor and 64 residential units above.

In Oregon Business economist Joe Cortright argued that the key to solving Portland’s affordability problems is a greater supply of new units.

KGW reported that the AC by Marriott in Downtown Portland has opened.

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