Weekly Roundup: Ankeny Apartments, Makers Row, Old Fire Station, and more

Ankeny Apartments

The City Council heard the appeal for the Ankeny Apartments

The Business Tribune reported on the City Council’s deliberations over the appeal for the Ankeny Apartmentswhich were denied by the Design Commission earlier this year.

The DJC wrote about plans by the Portland Development Commission to rehabilitate* the long vacant Old Fire Station Property in Old Town Chinatown.

According to the Oregonian the 111-year old Chamberlain Hotel building, formerly home to Shleifer Furniture, will house a temporary homeless shelter while plans progress for its renovation into a hotel.

CityLab published an article about the Burnside Bridgehead, titled Portland’s Next Density Spurt, where projects such as Yard, Slate and the Fair-Haired Dumbbell are re-shaping the skyline.

Eater PDX reported that Japanese restaurant Kuu will open in Slate this summer.

The Hollywood Star News reported that the Makers Row development in Cully is nearing completion.

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Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

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Weekly Roundup: Hampton Inn, Custom Blocks, Garlington Center, and more

Custom Blocks

Interior of the Custom Blocks development, by developer Capstone Partners and architect Scott Edwards Architecture.

Eater PDX reported that chef David Machado will open Tanner Creek Tavern this summer in the Pearl District Hampton Inn & Suites.

The Business Tribune looked at the transformation of the Goat Blocks.

Places over Time studied the past, present and future of the Lloyd Districtwhich is being transformed by developments such as Oregon Square, 1400 NE Multnomah, 1510 NE Multnomah and Block 45.

The Custom Blocks at 1340 SE 9th Ave and 925 SE Main St are the latest industrial buildings in the Central Eastside to be converted to creative office use. The Business Tribune looked at how the buildings are evolving.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the Garlington Center affordable housing / health care development has been awarded $4.5M in tax credits.

Oregon Business reported that Portland is getting ready to issue $9 million of bonds to fund future affordable housing projects, backed by revenues from short term rentals such as airbnb.

Weekly Roundup: Carbon12, Framework, 38 Davis, and more

Carbon12

Path Architecture’s Carbon12 has now reached its full height, making it the tallest timber building in the USA

The Oregonian reported that new apartment construction has finally slowed rent growth — at least, at the high end.

While a proposed timber high rise in Manhattan has been cancelled, the DJC wrote about two tall Cross Laminated Timber buildings in Portland* that are moving ahead quickly: Carbon12 on N Williams; and Framework in the Pearl.

The Business Tribune had a look at moovel North America’s new headquarters at the Overland Warehouse in Old Town / Chinatown. Similarly, Portland Architecture toured Ankrom Moisan’s new home a few blocks away at 38 Davis.

Delays in getting new height limits approved as part of the Central City 2035 Plan are having knock on delays to Old Town Chinatown Block 33reported the Business Tribune.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at what’s in store for the creative office space at the Meier & Frank Building, soon to be vacated by Macy’s.

Breakside Brewery unveiled its “Humongous, Hop-Focused Slabtown Brewery” at the Slabtown Marketplace, reported Portland Monthly.

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Weekly Roundup: Pearl East, 1725 SE Tenino, 5035 NE Sandy and more

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan, by Mackenzie

The Pearl East Building at NW 13th & Glisan is currently being reviewed by the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission. According to the DJC the Commission appeared inclined to support the project*, but granted a request by a neighbor to extend the public comment period.

‘Portland For Everyone’ wrote about two buildings in Sellwood-Moreland, at 1707-1725 SE Tenino St and 5965-6003 SE Milwaukie Ave that could be the first buildings to include affordable housing through the Portland’s new Inclusionary Zoning ordinance. Though vested under the old code, the developer is exploring the option of removing the previously required parking spaces and adding affordable units.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about the new development at 5035 NE Sandy Blvd, on the site formerly home to der Rheinlander. The 32,000 sq ft building will include 24,000 square feet leased by Portland Clinic and 6,000 to 8,000 sq ft of ground-floor retail space.

The Willamette Week wrote about how “early signs point to trouble for a record-setting Portland Public Schools bond“. If passed, the $790 bond would include funding to renovate Benson High School and Madison High School, and to raze and rebuild Lincoln High School and Kellogg Middle School.

Oregon Business published images of Portland’s “latest Insta-worthy hotel“, the AC by Marriott.

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Weekly Roundup: Custom Blocks, AC by Marriott, 4W and more

AC Hotel Portland

The AC by Marriott at SW 3rd & Taylor has opened.

The DJC broke the news* that the 4W tower at 419 SW Washington St is on hold as developer Greystar struggles to gain financing for the project.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about Portland’s latest creative office development: the Custom Blocks at 1340 SE 9th Ave and 925 SE Main St.

Portland Architecture sat down wtih Holst Architecture’s new owners to discuss the firm’s evolution.

The Rose City Park neighborhood association has weighed in on the proposed apartments at 5036 NE Sandy Blvd, reports the Hollywood Star News.

The Portland Chronicle reported that a demolition permit has been issued for the 1965 warehouse with the ‘Machine’ mural at 4018 N Williams Ave. The 5 warehouse will be replaced with a 5 story mixed use building with retail on first floor and 64 residential units above.

In Oregon Business economist Joe Cortright argued that the key to solving Portland’s affordability problems is a greater supply of new units.

KGW reported that the AC by Marriott in Downtown Portland has opened.

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Weekly Roundup: Convention Center Garage, 1320 Broadway, Clay Creative, and more

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The Portland Development Commission funded garage proposed adjacent to the Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The DJC reported that multifamily design work is waning* following the rush to submit developments before the implementation of the new inclusionary housing rules.

Portland for Everyone said that to ensure Portland’s new anti-eviction rule has teeth the city needs to raise its devastatingly low vacancy rates.

Portland Shoupistas argued that the Portland Development Commission’s plans for new parking garages in Old Town and at the Convention Center Hotel put the agency at odds with the city’s climate action and transportation goals.

Portland Architecture spoke to Restore Oregon executive director Peggy Moretti about changes to state administrative rules that make protecting Oregon’s historic buildings just a little easier.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at the University of Oregon’s new spaces inside the recently completed Old Town building 38 Davis.

Eater PDX reported that Ristretto Roasters have opened in the former Oregonian building at 1320 Broadway and that Stacked Sandwich Shop is open at Clay Creative, headquarters of online bank Simple.

The Business Tribune wrote about the partnership between Portland Parks and Recreation and ZRZ Realty to deliver a health and wellness-oriented South Waterfront at the Zidell Yards.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Eastside Distilling will not be moving forward with plans for an expansion at 1805 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Press Blocks, Vista Pearl, Swift Headquarters, and more

Image of the Press Blocks development in Goose Hollow, from the project’s second Design Advice Request hearing in October 2016 (image by Mithun)

According to the Portland Business Journal the sale of the former Oregonian printing facilities in Goose Hollow has closed. Urban Renaissance Group and Security Properties paid $20 million for the site, which is set to be redevelopment as the Press Blocks.

The Business Tribune wrote about the new leadership at Holst Architecture.

After more than 20 years, Mark Edlen has handed over the reins at Gerding Edlen, reports the Portland Business Journal.

The NW Examiner reported that the amount of ground retail at the Vista Pearl (formerly Block 20) will be reduced from what was originally approved.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation is looking for feedback on what type of bike parking should be required at new apartment buildings, reported BikePortland.

The DJC wrote about how local architecture firms make decisions on whether to speak up on political issues.*

The prospect of lower corporate taxes under President Trump is having a chilling effect on one of the main sources of financing for affordable housing developments, wrote the Portland Mercury. Local projects affected include Innovate Housing’s NW 14th & Raleigh development, which now has a $1.8 million funding gap.

The Portland Business Journal took a look at the Swift Headquarters, completed last year in the former Rose City Awnings building in NW.

As part of their Architect’s Questionnaire series, Portland Architecture interviewed Nat Slayton of ZGF Architects.

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Weekly Roundup: Central Courthouse, Crusher Court, Crane Count, and more

William Kaven Architecture received Design Advice from the Historic Landmarks Commission for Old Town Chinatown Block 33

The team behind Old Town Chinatown Block 33 received Design Advice from the Portland Historic Landmarks Commission. The DJC wrote about the reaction they received*.

BikePortland reported that the bike lanes on NW Naito / Front will be extended from NW 9th Ave to NW 19th Ave, with funding coming in part from the developers behind the Field Office.

Guerrilla Development’s New New Crusher Court will open in February, according to the Hollywood Star News.

Major construction on the Multnomah County Central Courthouse will begin soon, when crews from Hoffman Construction begin excavation, reported the Portland Business Journal.

The Seattle Times reported that Seattle had more cranes on its skyline than any other US city and over twice as many as Portland. Portland nevertheless has more cranes than San Francisco, Denver, Austin, New York or Boston.

The Portland Chronicle reported than deconstruction is underway at the 1889 building at 3336 SE Belmont St, set to be replaced by a new 3 story mixed use building.

Portland for Everyone posted a preview of Portland’s 2017 policy decisions to Open Housing.

The Portland Business Journal that Kurt Fischer Structural Engineering, who are working on The Woodlark Hotel have opened a Portland office to focus on the project and to tap into new opportunities in the region.

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Weekly Roundup: Robert Sacks, Schools Bond, SolTerra, and more

A potential massing for a rebuilt Lincoln High School, by Bora Architects. Under this option the existing school would remain in operation while a new building is constructed where the football field is currently located.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools now plans to include complete modernization of three high schools, Lincoln, Benson and Madison, in its May 2017 bond measure.

In the wake of the NW Portland natural gas explosion, the DJC wrote about developer Robert Sacks’ plans to move forward*.  Allied Works Architecture, who designed the damaged building 2281 NW Glisan, are preparing drawings that will allow the building to be rebuild. They are also working on designs for a new three-story building building at 510 NW 23rd Ave to replace the 111-year-old building that was destroyed.

Places Over Time looked at the 2016 works of architecture and urban planning that have “creatively added to the livability, artistry, and longevity of Portland’s built environment“, including Albina Yard, Pearl West and Milwaukie Way.

A 100-bed winter shelter has opened in the Washington Center, reported The Oregonian. The building is currently sitting vacant while developer Greystar and architects ZGF prepares plans for the 4W Tower.

The Portland Chronicle reported that a 106-year-old apartment complex and automotive repair shop at 1335 SE Stark St will be torn down to make way for a four-story, 39-unit apartment complex.

The DJC reported that design-build firm SolTerra has split into two businesses and laid off design professionals.

The Business Tribune asked developers if they would still build housing in PDX under the inclusionary zoning policy.

The Portland Business Journal looked at the 34 most prominent real estate projects to watch in 2017.

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