Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, Nesika Illahee, Nature Conservancy, and more

Portland Diamond Project

The Portland Diamond Project has proposed an MLB stadium on the banks of the Willamette.

The Portland Diamond Project has an agreement with the Port of Portland to build an MLB stadium on the Terminal 2 site, reports the Oregonian. The paper also reported that Mayor Wheeler said the city “wouldn’t pay for a stadium or buy a team” but could “absorb some costs related to transportation and other infrastructure such as utility service”, and looked into what we know (and don’t know) about the proposal.  BikePortland looked at the access issues around the proposed riverfront stadium. The Portland Business Journal asked its readers what they think about the stadium.

The Business Tribune reported on Nesika Illahee (formerly known as Holman 42), which includes units reserved for members of federally recognized tribes.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how the Nature Conservancy is “sprucing up its Oregon headquarters with tons of timber“.

TMT Development, best know its development of downtown high rises, has completed The Marilyn at 2310 SE Hawthorne Blvd. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the 59-unit mixed use building.

The Oregonian reports that the City Council declined to block the affordable housing development proposed at 1727 NW Hoyt St.

The Oregonian looked at whether the site under the Broadway Bridge is too contaminated for the Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter.

The Portland Timbers will play their first 12 games on the road in 2019 due to construction of the Providence Park Expansion, reports the Oregonian. The club now  “expects the expansion project to be completed by late May or early June 2019.”

Weekly Roundup: Broadway Corridor, Beatrice Morrow, NW 18th & Hoyt, and more

“Play” is one of three concepts being explored for the Broadway Corridor. In this concept the North Park Blocks are extended to Johnson, with a flexible open space that can be used for sports and community gatherings.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that Portland officials are in the early stages of trying to recruit an anchor tenant* for the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

The Business Tribune wrote about the Beatrice Morrow, an 80 unit affordable housing development by Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives (PCRI). Over time the goal is for “75 percent of the families that rent units in the building to move on to home ownership with the help of PCRI”.

Japanese retailer Muji has now opened in the Meier & Frank Building. The Business Tribune wrote about the Japanese retailer is “adding a next chapter to the story of retail in Portland“. Eater Portland reported that “beloved” Ladd’s Addition coffee shop Upper Left Roasters will also open in the building.

The Northwest District Association has appealed the approval of the affordable housing at NW 18th and Hoyt because they think it’s “ugly”, reports the Portland Mercury. The City Council will consider the appeal on Thursday.

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Weekly Roundup: ART Tower, Muji at Meier & Frank, The Hoxton, and more

The ART is the first high-rise building to be approved that is subject to Inclusionary Housing. The tower will include 314 units in its 21 floors.

The Design Commission last week approved the ART Tower, which will be located on the northern half of the Artists Repertory Theatre block in Goose Hollow. The Daily Journal of Commerce reports that there were “rave reviews for ‘a very distinguished building’.”*

The Hoxton hotel last week opened in the renovated and expanded Grove Hotel. The Portland Business Journal took a first look inside.

The Oregonian looked inside the Radisson Red hotel, which opened last week in the Broadway Tower.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of Japanese retailer MUJI’s space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

OPB wrote about how the Albina Vision is hoping to bring big changes to the Portland Public Schools site in the Rose Quarter.

Having now been approved by the voters, Metro’s housing bond program is set to launch in summer, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Metro Housing Bond, Multnomah County Courthouse, Beatrice Morrow, and more

Multnomah County Central Courthouse

The new Multnomah County Central Courthouse has now reached its full height of 325′.

The Oregonian reported that voters approved a $652.8 million bond for affordable housing in the Portland metro area and a constitutional amendment which will allow funds to be leveraged with private money and federal tax credits.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on the demolition* of one of the old Oregonian publishing buildings, which is making way for Canvas at the Press Blocks.

The Oregonian took a look inside one of the units at The Carson in Slabtown.

The last structural beam has been lifted to the top of the new Multnomah County Central Courthouse, reports the Oregonian.

The Beatrice Morrow, an affordable housing development targeted to displaced residents of NE Portland, has opened on NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

The Portland Diamond Project has withdrawn their offer for the Portland Public Schools Site, to clear the way for the Albina Vision. The group says they will announce a preferred location for an MLB stadium site by end of the month.

Eater Portland took a look at the menus for the Radisson Red’s Ouibar and Kitchen, which will be located in the Broadway Tower.

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Weekly Roundup: Block 216, Neuberger Hall, Garlington Center, and more

Block 216

The Block 216 tower had its first Type III Design Review hearing last Thursday. Cart owners have been told they might need to vacate the 10th & Alder lot as soon as May.

With the surface parking lots currently home to downtown food carts being replaced by developments that include the Moxy Hotel and Block 216advocates have called for a ‘culinary corridor’ along the midtown Park Blocks right of way.

The Southeast Examiner looked at the “phantom laundromat” at 2731 SE Belmont St. A building permit for a 5-story 46 unit apartment building on site is currently ‘approved to issue’, however a demolition permit for the existing structure has expired.

As the first buildings subject to the city’s inclusionary housing ordinance come online, the Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how different developers are complying with the mandate*.

Excess land from MAX construction could become affordable housing, writes the Oregonian.

The Business Tribune looked at the “projects aplenty” at Portland State University, including the Fourth and Montgomery Building and the Neuberger Hall Renovation.

Lonely Planet wrote about the KEX Portland, the “ultra-chic Icelandic hostel” planned at the Burnside Bridgehead.

Portland Monthly wrote about the Garlington Center, which brings health care and housing under one roof.

Fearing rent control, Portland developers are backing Loretta Smith, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Magnolia II, The Hoxton, Carbon12, and more

Magnolia 2

The Magnolia 2 will include 50 new affordable apartment unit, directly adjacent to the first phase, which was completed in 2013.

Eater Portland looked at The Hoxton, “Chinatown’s new restaurant-packed hotel [that] is as cozy as it is chic.”

The Oregonian wrote about the two affordable housing measures Portland area voters are deciding on this year.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how affordable housing developer Innovative Housing is partnering with a pre-apprenticeship program to provide workforce training during construction of the Magnolia II Apartments at 3250 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

The Oregonian looked at who is moving into nation’s tallest timber building, Carbon12.

Weekly Roundup: The Silica, The Woodlark, Old Town Chinatown, and more

Cornelius-Woodlark

The Woodlark Hotel is set to open in December.

Four year’s after the adoption of the $57 million Old Town Chinatown action plan, the Oregonian reported that almost none of what was planned has happened.

Eater Portland reported that downtown will soon have a spot for for Czech breakfast pastries at The Woodlark hotel.

The Portland Tribune reports that rents in Portland have dropped 2.7% year-on-year, which is the steepest decline in the nation

The Design Commission presented their annual State of the City Design Report* to City Council last week, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Business Tribune wrote about The Silica, the latest addition to N Williams Ave.

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Weekly Roundup: 140 SW Columbia, Heartline, Iron Fireman, and more

140 SW Columbia St

140 SW Columbia will include 349 residential units, directly to the east of the KOIN tower.

Construction on the 20-story tower at 140 SW Columbia will begin by the end of the year, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reported vacation management company Vacasa has moved into a new home, occupying all the office space at HeartlineThe Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the GBD Architects-designed tenant improvement.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the Iron Fireman building, where a second phase of core-and-shell improvements is wrapping up.

Mayor Wheeler has selected Shannon Callahan as the permanent director of the Portland Housing Bureau, according to the Oregonian. Callahan had been serving as the interim director since 2017.

Hey Love, the ’60s- and ’70s-style fern bar-inspired cocktail joint, has opened inside the Jupiter NEXT hotel, reports the Portland Mercury.

Weekly Roundup: 7 Southeast Stark, 1727 NW Hoyt, Press Blocks, and more

7 Southeast Stark

7 Southeast Stark will include four floors of office space above 6 levels of structured parking.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at construction progress at 7 Southeast Stark, the 10-story mixed use building being squeezed into a parcel between I5 and the Union Pacific railroad tracks*. Plans for a nearby 9 story office building at 129 SE Alder, also designed by Works Progress Architecture for Harsch Properties, have been put on hold.

Construction on the Press Blocks will start this month, reports the Oregonian. The first phase of development will include the half block office building, now known as Canvas. Construction on the 23-story tower is expected to start in 2019, however financing has yet to be secured.

The Northwest Examiner wrote about the impact of the ethics complaints leveled against Historic Landmarks Commissioner Wendy Chung, over her involvement in the review of the affordable housing development at 1727 NW Hoyt St.

The City of Portland is moving to preserve and create new affordable homes near the proposed SW Corridor MAX line, reports the Oregonian.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress at the TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch.

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Weekly Roundup: Redd on Salmon, Garlington Place, TwentyTwenty, and more

The Redd

The Redd East involves the adaptive reuse of a 1918 ironworks building in the Central Eastside.

Construction is nearing completion on the east building at The Redd on Salmon Street, the two-block food distribution hub by the Ecotrust. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress made to date.

In what is believed to be a first for Portland, a quarter of the units at the TwentyTwenty Condominiums are being marketed exclusively to buyers who live in Asia, reports the Oregonian.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the recently completed Garlington Place Apartments in Northeast Portland. The 52 unit development includes a mix of homes designated as affordable to people earning under 60% of median family income, for veterans, and for clients of the adjacent health clinic in critical need.

The Oregonian reported that the 148-unit affordable housing development at 1727 NW Hoyt St was approved by the Historic Landmarks Commission. Housing activist and attorney Alan Kessler has filed a lawsuit against the City of Portland, over the high cost of extracting public records, according to the Willamette Week. Kessler had requested records related to the involvement of one of the members of the Landmarks Commission during early Design Advice Request meetings.