Weekly Roundup: OMSI Masterplan, Lloyd Center, Jefferson Station, and more

The OMSI masterplan envisions realigning SE Water Avenue to run along the perimeter of the site.

As much as 2 million square feet of development in the Central Eastside is proposed as part of the OMSI Masterplan, reports the Oregonian—the equivalent of two U.S. Bancorp Towers. The masterplan went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Advice Request meeting last week.

The Broadway Corridor Masterplan also had its first Design Advice Request meeting. Commissioners praised “the change it would bring to the area but [took] issue with the intended use of the city’s Green Loop,”* according to the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Business Tribune published an interview with outgoing Lloyd Center manager Bob Dye. Work is set to start soon on the Lloyd West Anchor Remodel, which will include a Live Nation venue. The center recently presented revised plans for the Lloyd East Anchor Remodel to the Design Commission.

The Willamette Week reported that the cost of building new schools and affordable housing could rise under the Portland Clean Energy Fund, due the fact that large construction companies are being classified as “retail businesses.”

The Business Tribune spoke to 10 food carts about their plans for where they will go after construction starts on Block 216. The Oregonian wrote about 10 carts that turned downtown Portland’s biggest food cart pod into a tourist destination.

A Portland preservationist, and former chair of the Historic Landmarks Commission, wants the Jefferson Station building removed from the National Register of Historic Places, reports the Oregonian. The shell of the historic building is being incorporated into the new Multnomah County Central Courthouse.

The Business Tribune wrote about Opsis Architecture at 20.

Multnomah County hopes to create an alternative to jail or the emergency room for mentally ill homeless people at the recently purchased 333 SW Park Ave building, writes the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: PDX Concourse E, Block 216, Wells Fargo Center, and more

Construction is well underway at the PDX Concourse E Extension. The expanded concourse is set to open to the public in 2020.

The Business Tribune wrote about how the PDX Concourse E Extension is making Southwest Airlines at home.

The Daily Journal of Commerce broke the news that vendors at the 10th & Alder food cart pod have until June 30th to vacate the site. The carts and surface parking will be replaced by the Block 216 hotel, office and condominium tower.

After nearly 20 years in business, Myhre Group Architects will soon shut down, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the N Williams Center, which will include 60 units of affordable housing.

Eater Portland reports that Los Angeles “restaurant vet” Doug Miriello is opening a food hall at the Wells Fargo Center.

The Portland Diamond Project has received a 6-month extension to further study the Port of Portland Terminal 2 site, reports the Oregonian.

The Parking Minute argued against reducing parking minimums only where directly adjacent to transit, citing the example of the Dairy Apartments planned at 801 NE 21st Ave.

Weekly Roundup: Eastside Innovation Hub, 7 Southeast Stark, Tanner Point, and more

A new top story will be added to an existing building at SE 8th & Alder as part of its conversion into the Eastside Innovation Hub.

The Business Tribune wrote about two bioscience buildings planned by Summit Development: the Eastside Innovation Hub at 808 SE Alder, which will add a new story to an existing building; and the New Industrial Revolution Center, a 10-story cross-laminated timber building planned at 920 SE Stark St.

The Daily Journal of Commerce visited 7 Southeast Stark, an under construction building that is “either a major new office project with ample parking, or a major new parking project with an office component.”*

Portland Architecture wrote about two recent office buildings designed by Hacker, including Tanner Point at the north end of the Pearl.

With three attempts at redeveloping Centennial Mills ending in failure, Brian Libby argued in the Business Tribune that it should become an industrial ruins park.

A man who was in an apparent mental crisis scaled the construction crane at 5 MLK and remained at the top for more than five hours, reports the Oregonian.

Fast food restaurant Super Deluxe will open a second location in the Pearl District’s Heartline building, reports Eater Portland.

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Weekly Roundup: Lincoln High School, 333 SW Park, 72 Foster, and more

Bora presented the latest design for the Lincoln High School rebuild to the Design Commission on Thursday of last week.

The changes made to Lincoln High School were received warmly by the Design Commission*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Up for Growth claims that Portland’s Inclusionary Housing policy is slowing the development of apartments projects, writes the Portland Tribune. The Portland House Bureau however disagrees.

OPB Think Out Loud spoke to a range of people about HB 2001, the bill that would end local bans on duplexes, triplexes and fourplex in low density zones.

Multnomah County bought a building at 333 SW Park for use as a mental health and addiction resource center. The county however lacks the “funds to operate it or a detailed plan for what to do with it“, according to the Willamette Week.

The Business Tribune wrote about 72 Foster, a recently completed 101-unit affordable housing development that also includes ground floor retail.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building, Live Nation South Waterfront, The Canyons, and more

The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will be located across the street from the existing building, and include a skybridge over SW 6th Ave.

A resident-run retirement community is planning a $100 million expansion, reports the Oregonian. The Terwilliger Plaza Parkview Building will rise to 10 stories and include 127 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

Live Nation is in talks with the Zidell family to build a 10,000-seat performance venue in South Waterfront, according to the Oregonian.

Turner Construction is rushing to complete work* on the Providence Park Expansion in time for the Portland Timbers’ home opener on June 1, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Prosper Portland has selected the “Play” concept for the Broadway Corridor, writes the Oregonian. The concept would see the former post office “replaced with sports fields and basketball courts flanked by high-rises.”

A proposed bill in the Oregon legislature aims to create more lower priced condominium units. Developments that go through a more stringent envelope inspection would see the period for lawsuits reduced from 10 years to six, and require approval from a majority of homeowners to initiate a lawsuit.

The 101 affordable apartments at 72 Foster are now complete. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the development, which has an “intergenerational focus.”

The Business Tribune wrote about how at The Canyons developer Ben Kaiser is creating a “community with no limits on age or accessibility.”

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: OHSU Hospital Expansion, Alberta Commons, 4th & Burnside, and more

The OHSU Hospital Expansion Project involves construction of a 14-story tower on the site of the former Dental School.

At an initial meeting the Design Commission indicated that plans for the OHSU Hospital Expansion Project require more work to meet city guidelines,* writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

As work progresses on the Adidas Campus Expansion construction cranes are the latest flashpoint in clash between Adidas and neighbors, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland is asking for proposals to redevelop two properties in Old Town. The NW 4th & Burnside is known for being the former home of Right 2 Dream Too. Block 25 at the north end of Chinatown is currently used as surface parking for NW Natural.

The Skanner spoke to three minority-owned businesses moving into the Alberta Commons development at NE MLK and Alberta.

The Portland Diamond Project is approaching a deadline to “start paying real money to reserve a marine cargo terminal for its billion-dollar baseball park — or give up on building at the site,” reports the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: PUC Affordable Housing Initiative, Raleigh Slabtown, Orchards of 82nd, and more

Portsmouth Union Church Affordable Housing
Portsmouth Union Church intends to build 20 units of affordable housing on their N Lombard St property.

An article published at Medium wrote about the PUC Affordable Housing Initiative at 4775 N Lombard. Portsmouth Union Church is one of 435 faith based organizations in Portland with property that could be used for affordable housing.

Portland is taking another look at low-rent SRO hotels to ease its housing problems, writes the Oregonian. While many private SRO units have been lost in recent years, the Portland Housing Bureau plans on funding the redevelopment of the Westwind Apartments in Old Town and construction of Findley Commons on SE Powell.

The Orchards of 82nd (previously known as the ROSE/APANO Affordable Mixed Use) opened in February and now houses 47 families, writes Metro News.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at the construction of Raleigh Slabtown, which is employing a prefabricated wall-panel system.

The Portland Tribune wrote about how state law makers are building the political foundation for a series of housing bills.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: Centennial Mills, 72 Foster, Oregon Harbor of Hope, and more

The recently completed 72 Foster building includes 101 units of affordable housing. It will also include a pizza restaurant at its ground floor.

Prosper Portland’s efforts to redevelop Centennial Mills have once again fallen through, with developer Lynd Corporate choosing not to move forward with a project on the site, reports Willamette Week.

The Oregonian reported that Portland Public Schools construction costs could top $1 billion and that “district officials lack ‘rationale or explanation’ for low-ball estimates.”

An appeal of the design review approval* for the Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter and navigation center went in front of the Design Commission, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held for Northwest Housing Alternatives’ latest affordable housing development at 9747 NE Glisan St, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Pizzeria Otto will open a second location in the ground floor of 72 Foster, reports the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: NIR Center, 5020 Condos, Providence Park, and more

The NIR Center includes two connected buildings with a total of 347,000 sq ft of space for
early- and mid-stage bioscience and technology companies.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look (subscription required) at the New Industrial Revolution Center, a 10-story biotech incubator planned at 920 SE Stark.

Inclusionary housing production is lagging goals,* writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

A partnership between Proud Ground and Habitat for Humanity Portland/Metro East will enable to the 5020 Condos to cater to residents harmed by urban renewal, reports the Portland Business Journal.

Portland Architecture published a conversation with Base Design + Architecture, a young firm whose work includes a modular building at 1590 SE Holgate that is set to break ground soon.

The Portland Diamond Project released new renderings of the proposed riverfront baseball stadium.

The Oregonian looked at what an expanded Providence Park will mean for parking and traffic near the stadium.

Build-your-own poke shop Olia Poke & Tea will open in the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building, reports Eater Portland.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Weekly Roundup: One Pacific Square, Assembly Brewing, Redfox Commons, and more

A major renovation of the ground floor level and street plaza spaces is planned at One Pacific Square. NW Natural will vacate approximately 180,000 sq ft of space in the building when it moves to 250 Taylor.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about how owners of large office buidings are “revving up renovations” as more new office space comes on the market.* Older buildings including the Wells Fargo Center and One Pacific Square have major renovations planned. The recently completed but as yet unleased 9North Building is being renamed Tanner Point, and will undergo a retail makeover and other interior renovations.

Newly opened Assembly Brewing at 6112 SE Foster Rd is bringing pub beers and Detroit-style pizza to Foster-Powell, reports the Oregonian.

The Business Tribune wrote about the Redfox Commons, a former farm equipment manufacturing facility in Northwest Portland that has received a new life.

Portland halted unpermitted tunneling work by OHSU at their riverfront Schnitzer campus, according to the Oregonian.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.