Weekly Roundup: Hyatt Place, The Canyons, Heartline, and more

The Canyons

The Canyons will include a Japanese style alley running through the site, where the public can past eleven live/work spaces with storefronts, intended to include essential services for seniors, workspaces for artisans, and other small businesses.

The Oregonian confirmed that Seattle-based developer Vibrant Cities plans to build a Hyatt Place branded hotel in the Pearl District.

The Esco site in NW Portland has sold to a consortium of developers — not including the group behind the Portland Diamond Project, writes the Oregonian.

The New York Times covered Heartline, the Pearl District building that “serves to unite the two halves of the surrounding neighborhood“.

Portland Monthly wrote about The Canyons, new housing concept on N Williams that “aims to change how some Portlanders age“.

The Portland Tribune reported that renovation costs for the shelter at 6144 SE Foster Rd have increased by $1 million.

Weekly Roundup: 10506 E Burnside St, Block 216, TwentyTwenty, and more

Block 216

GBD Architects’ design for Block 216 would rise to a height of 460 and include 35 floors.

Block 216 went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Advice Request hearing. According to the Daily Journal of Commerce the project team “plans to proceed to formal Type III design review in October with a goal of breaking ground in May 2019“.*

An 51-unit apartment complex at 10506 E Burnside St will be the first newly constructed building purchased with funds from Portland’s housing bond, reports the Willamette Week.

The Metro Council voted to send a $652.8 million affordable housing bond to the region’s voters, despite last minute opposition from Washington County Chair Andy Duyck.

Architecture firm West of West published their unselected designs for the ODOT Blocks in the Central Eastside, prepared for developer Lincoln Property Company.

Portland Architecture visited Portland State University’s new “ship in a bottle“, the Viking Pavilion.

As Multnomah County prepares to dispose of the 1914 Multnomah County Courthouse KATU reported that locals hope it is preserved after the sale.

Portland Monthly looked at TwentyTwenty and asked whether Portland’s condo market will make a come back.

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Weekly Roundup: Block 216, 525 SE MLK, Portland Diamond Project, and more

Block 216

Block 216 will be 33-story hotel, office and condominium tower.

The Oregonian reported that “Portland’s first ‘5-star’ hotel [is] planned” at Block 216, currently known for the large food cart pod on the site.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the demolition of the Portland Music building in the Central Eastside. The 86-year-old commercial building will be replaced by a new office building at 525 SE MLK.

The NW Examiner reported that the peace deal over the now approved Fremont Place Apartments could be “as contentious as the fight“.

The Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring major league baseball to Portland, is now looking at the Port of Portland’s Terminal 2, according to the Willamette Week. The Oregonian reported that Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and singer Ciara have joined the effort as minority investors.

Metro is poised to refer a $652.8 million housing bond to voters, writes the Oregonian.

Weekly Roundup: Platform, 72Foster, The Geode, and more

Allied Works’ Platform would include 140,000 SF of commercial office space with retail space on the ground floor.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the 72Foster, the four story affordable housing development currently rising in SE Portland.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about The Geode, the new creative office project on SE Division by Portland sculptor Martin Eichinger.

OPB wrote about how Portland State University’s campus is evolving to attract new generation of students, with projects that include Four+Montgomery, the Neuberger Hall Renovation, the Karl Miller Center, and the Viking Pavilion.

Portland Architecture interviewed Allied Works’ Brent Linden about Platform, the office building proposed for a half block site at 1130 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd.

As part of the final deliberations on the Central City 2035 plan the City Council voted to set heights in portions of Chinatown at 200′, reports OPB.

Weekly Roundup: Jupiter NEXT hotel, Allan Building, Multnomah County Central Courthouse, and more

The Allan Building would rise to to a height of seven stories and include over 70,000 sq ft of occupied space.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about two Central Eastside industrial office buildings* proposed by Intrinsic Ventures: the Allan Building at 2455 SE 11th Ave and SE 8th & Division building at 2445 SE 8th Ave.

The Willamette Week reported that the new Multnomah County Central Courthouse comes with a solar-energy system that will take more than a century to pay for itself.

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at the Jupiter NEXT hotel, which is scheduled to open next month.

Affordable housing developers face rising costs. The Willamette Week reports that Mayor Ted Wheeler isn’t plugging the hole.

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Weekly Roundup: Fremont Place, Block 76 West, ODOT Blocks, and more

Fremont Place

The revised design for the Fremont Place apartments will include a wider greenway trail and creative art studio spaces facing the river.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Block 76 West—the project formerly known as Sideyard—which is “being squeezed into hot spot“*.

In a 4-0 vote, the Portland City Council took a tentative vote to approve revised designs for the Fremont Place ApartmentsThe Pearl District Neighborhood Association had previously voted to drop their opposition to the project.

Longtime Central Eastside developer Beam has been picked to lead the redevelopment of the ODOT Blocks, reports the Oregonian.

According to the Oregonian Blue Star Donuts will open a “massive new downtown Portland flagship” in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Oregonian published images of what the MLB stadium proposed as part of the Portland Diamond Project could look like.

Foundation work is underway on 250 Taylor, which will be the new home for NW Natural. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress to date.

The Portland Tribune reported that ‘World-class’ Portland school rebuilds are still planned despite $100M funding gap.

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Weekly Roundup: Food Cart Block, Adidas Campus Expansion, Taylor Works, and more

The Adidas Campus Expansion will include a building at N Delaware and N Sumner, and a relocated vehicular entry from N Greeley Ave

The Oregonian reported on plans to redevelop a site at 936 SW Washington Stcurrently home to Portland’s largest and best known food cart pod—with a 33-story tower, which would include office space, hotel rooms and apartments. The site is currently owned by the Goodman family, who the Daily Journal of Commerce reports have projects aplenty in progress.* Other current developments of theirs include 230 AshEleven West, and the Moxy Hotel.

The Portland Business Journal has the latest information on OMSI‘s ambitious Central Eastside expansion ambitions.

The Willamette Week covered the City’s annual State of Housing in Portland report, which includes some hope for struggling renters.

The Portland Business Journal reported that neighbors are opposing the Adidas Campus Expansion plans in North Portland. The Portland Design Commission has however shown early support for the proposal.

Portland Public Schools has “thrown a curveball” at the Portland Diamond Project‘s plans for an MLB stadium in the Rose Quarter, reports the Willamette Week. The Portland Business Journal reports that the group behind the project isn’t vexed by the proposed bidding process for the site.

The Urban Works Real Estate blog published construction updates on the Taylor Works Building at SE 2nd & Taylor, which is undergoing a major renovation and alteration.

The Business Tribune wrote about Continuum Partners, the developer that has been chosen to lead the Broadway Corridor redevelopment.

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Weekly Roundup: Portland Diamond Project, 126 NE Alberta, 1727 NW Hoyt, and more

A proposed development at 1727 NW Hoyt St, designed by Carleton Hart Architecture for Northwest Housing Alternatives, would include 149 units of affordable housing.

The Oregonian reported that the management group behind the Portland Diamond Project, which hopes to bring Major League Baseball to the city, have put in offers for two sites: the Portland Public Schools Blanchard Education Service Center near the Rose Quarter and the Esco Industrial site in Northwest Portland. The paper also reported that the group has spent $30,000 lobbying city hall to date. The Willamette Week reported that the offer to PPS would include giving the school district the former Banfield Pet Hospital Headquarters on 82nd Avenue.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about how the threat of a large apartment building at 1727 NW Hoyt St has led one neighbor to dig deep into history.

Portland for Everyone wrote about how an upzone at 126 NE Alberta St would turn a parking lot into 50 below-market-rate homes. An op-ed in the Oregonian described the proposal as the “21st-century version of red-lining“.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported on plans for to build the Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter at the Broadway Bridge. The proposal is latest in a number of plans for the site*, which have included One Waterfront Place and the Broadway Bridge-Naito Parkway Apartments. In an article about the project the Portland Tribune revealed that plans for a shelter in an existing building at 320 NW Hoyt St have now been abandoned due to the high costs of converting the building to a new use.

OPB reported on Portland Community Reinvestment Initiative Inc’s plans to plans to bring African-American families back to North Portland.

The Portland Business Journal published a visual tour of CENTRL Office’s latest space in the 12th & Morrison office building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Redfox Commons.  The project involves the conversion of the Old Freeman Factory in Northwest Portland into creative office space.

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Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

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Weekly Roundup: PSU Viking Pavilion, Fremont Place, Providence Park, and more

PSU Viking Pavilion

Construction has wrapped up on the PSU Viking Pavilion

In a 3-2 vote the City Council re-opened the door for approval of the Fremont Place Apartments, according to the Oregonian.  The Northwest Examiner asked why the issue was all about protecting views of the Fremont Bridge… until it was not?

The Business Tribune reported that the Bridgetown Lofts have been sold to Madison Park Financial Corporation for $55 million.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the affordable housing under construction at NW 14th & Raleigh in the Pearl.

Before its opening last week, the Oregonian had a sneak peak at the PSU Viking Pavilion.

The Portland City Council voted to increase building heights on Old Town Chinatown Block 33 to 160′, reports the Portland Mercury.

Work is wrapping up* on first-phase of Providence Park Expansion, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce. The second phase is expected in time for the opening of the spring 2019 MLS season.

Portland Monthly looked at Carbon 12the new condo tower that “is both sustainable and seismically strong.”

Portland Architecture talked with Carrie Strickland about the new era at Works Progress Architecture.

The Willamette Week reported that the Oregon ballot measure to fix housing finance prohibition has passed its first milestone.

The Oregonian reported on the Mayor’s conclusion that efforts to aid Portland’s black neighborhoods are an “abject failure”.

According to the Portland Business Journal Hilton has throw open the doors of its newest Portland luxury hotel, The Porter.

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