Weekly Roundup: Fariborz Maseeh Hall, Kellogg Middle School, Redfox Commons, and more

PSU Neuberger Hall
The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at Portland State University is now open in Fariborz Maseeh Hall. The buiding, formerly known as Neuberger Hall, now has large areas of glazing facing the street instead of solid concrete walls.

Portland Architecture wrote about the winners of this year’s American Institute of Architects’ Portland Architecture Awards. The Redfox Commons received a Honor Award; Tillamook Row received a 2030 Award for sustainability; the River District Navigation Center and Jarrett Street 12 were among the projects that received Merit Awards; Silica, the OHSU Center for Health and Healing South and the Oregon Conservation Center received Citation Awards; while 7 Southeast Stark received a Citation Award for an unbuilt project.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about another structural investment in education* at the Kellogg Middle School, where construction crews recently placed the first of 27 concrete tilt panels.

The Portland Business Journal took a look inside the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at Portland State University, which is now open in Fariborz Maseeh Hall (formerly known as Neuberger Hall).

Portland Public Schools may wait until 2021 to ask for new construction bond, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland Mercury checked out KEX Portland, the “brand new design-focused social hotel.”

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Weekly Roundup: Glisan Apartments, KEX Portland, Premier Gear, and more

Construction work at the KEX Portland is nearing completion. The renovated building will include an Icelandic-Northwestern restaurant.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at construction progress at the Glisan Apartments, an affordable housing development in Gateway by Northwest Housing Alternatives.

Eater Portland took a sneak peak a menus for Icelandic-Northwestern restaurant Vivian at the Burnside bridgehead hostel KEX Portland.

A proposed change to the Portland Clean Energy Fund would exclude construction companies from the definition of “retail”, reports the Portland Mercury.

In its Design Annual Portland Monthly looked at how the Design Commission shapes Portland’s building boom, behind the scenes. In a Q & A the architect behind the new Lincoln High School describes how it will be a “very urban school, not unlike something you might find in Chicago or New York.”

The Business Tribune wrote about the Premier Gear & Machine Works in Slabtown, which is being transformed into creative office space.

Weekly Roundup: District Office, J.K. Gill Building, Live Nation at Zidell Yards, and more

Renovation work will soon start at the J.K. Gill Building, which was acquired by Seattle-based developer Urban Renaissance Group after the Multnomah County Health Department left.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how construction crews are navigating challenges* in building the Central Eastside’s District Office.

Renovation work is starting at the J.K. Gill Building at 408 SW 5th Ave, reports the Portland Business Journal. The 1923 building was formerly home to the Multnomah County Health Department, who are now located at the Gladys McCoy Building.

The Design Commission believes that the proposed Live Nation at Zidell Yards has room for improvement, writes the Portland Business Journal.

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Weekly Roundup: Riverplace Redevelopment, Sideyard, Hyatt Centric, and more

The centerpiece of the Riverplace Redevelopment would be the “Portland Steps” at the corner of SW Montgomery Street and River Drive. The steps would lead people up to an elevated open space—and potentially to a bridge spanning over Harbor Drive to Naito Parkway.

Towers and terraces are imagined as part of the Riverplace Redevelopment, reports the Oregonian. At full build out the masterplan could include 2,500 apartments, 500 hotel rooms and 250,000 sq ft of office space.

Construction has finished* up at Sideyard, one of the “final pieces in the rapid redevelopment near the Burnside Bridge’s east end”, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

Masia by chef Jose Chesa will open as the anchor restaurant for the Hyatt Centric hotel, reports Portland Monthly.

The Business Tribune reported on how the $70 million renovation of Neuberger Hall, now known as Fariborz Maseeh Hall, has breathed new life and light into the Portland State University building.

Some businesses still bristling at having to pay Portland’s clean energy tax, reports the Oregonian. Included in the tax on “large retailers” are general contractors working on large projects, for clients including OHSU.

Portland Architecture looked at whether Sustainable Building Week can revive “Portland’s lost momentum”.

Portland Public Schools is eyeing a summer deadline to finalize details of a 2020 construction bond. The measure could include upgrades to Cleveland, Jefferson and Wilson high schools.

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Weekly Roundup: Álmr Apartments, Live Nation at Zidell Yards, Glass Lab, and more

The proposed Live Nation at Zidell Yards music venue went in front of the Design Commission for an initial meeting last week.

Plans for the 10,000 seat Live Nation at Zidell Yards music venue are moving forward, according to the Oregonian.

Work to convert the former Vivian Apartments into the KEX Portland Hostel nearing completion*, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The Oregonian wrote about developer C.E. John’s plans to construct a five story apartment building at 1137 NW 23rd Ave—a change in plans from an earlier proposal to renovate and expand the existing buildings on the site.

The Business Tribune wrote about how Glass Lab is offering a hip hub for start-ups. The building is named for the glass foundry formerly located into the recently renovated structure.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the winners of this year’s DeMuro Awards, given by Restore Oregon for excellence in preservation, reuse, and community revitalization. Projects honored in Portland included the Álmr Apartments at NW 21st and Irving; the AltSource Headquarters at 1120 SE Madison St; the Redd on Salmon St; and the Woodlark Hotel.

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Weekly Roundup: Adidas Campus Expansion, Hallock-McMillan, Wells Fargo Center, and more

Adidas Campus Village
The Adidas Campus Expansion will include the construction of a cycle track on N Greeley between N Going St and N Willamette Blvd.

Adidas will construct a cycle track on N Greeley Ave, reports Bike Portland. Construction is expected to cost $1.26 million. Adidas will receive a a $1 million credit towards the System Development Charges owed against the permits for the Adidas Campus Expansion.

The Oregonian wrote about Gordon Sondland, the Portland hotelier and Ambassador to the European Union, who is now linked the Ukraine scandal. Sondland’s company Provenance Hotels is the owner of a number of Portland hotels, including The Woodlark.

Portland Architecture spoke to Hallock-McMillan Building owner John Russell, and architect Brian Emerick, about the process of restoring Portland’s oldest commercial building

The Oregonian looked at whether Portland State University could co-locate its football team at the rebuilt Lincoln High School. Adding an 8,000 seat stadium to the relocated field would be possible—if the university’s athletic department can find the $65 million required.

The 47-year old landmark Wells Fargo Center and Exchange Building are in the middle of a extensive renovation. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress on site.

The Portland Mercury looked at the whether the Portland Diamond Project can succeed where others have failed and bring Major League Baseball to Portland.

The Business Tribune wrote about how two nearby projects, the Redfox Commons and the renovation of the Fairmount Apartments, have made a historic Northwest Portland intersection come alive again.

Weekly Roundup: Portland Proper Hotel, Dundon-Berchtold Hall, Alta at 18th, and more

The 9-story Portland Proper Hotel is proposed for a site at NW 13th Ave and Irving St in the Pearl District.

The Portland Proper Hotel had its first presentation to the Design Commission*, with the brick cladding drawing particular praise, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.

The University of Portland has unveiled the latest addition to its campus, the “$34M stunner” Dundon-Berchtold Hall, writes the Portland Business Journal.

The City of Portland declared that it’s on track to meet housing bond’s goals, according to the Oregonian. At a press conference it was announced that nine projects will receive funding through the bond: 115th at Division Street in Powellhurst-Gilbert; Alta at 18th in Northwest; Anna Mann House in Kerns; Cathedral Village in Cathedral Park; The Joyce Hotel in Downtown; Las Adelitas in Cully; NE Prescott in Cully; the Stark Street Project in Glenfair; and the The Westwind in Old Town.

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Weekly Roundup: Amara, Mann House, Block 25, and more

815 W Burnside St
Work has started on Amara, a 7-story building on W Burnside between NW Park Ave and 9th Ave.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Laurelhurst’s Mann House could become affordable housing. Nonprofit developer Innovative Housing is under contract to purchase the mansion, with plans to turn it into 80 apartments. Rents would be affordable to families with incomes of between 30 and 60 percent of the median family income.

Old Town’s Greyhound Station has closed, reports the Oregonian. The two-acre is now listed for sale as a redevelopment site.

Two proposals in Old Town Chinatown are moving forward*, according to the Daily Journal of Commerce. At Block 25 Key Development is proposing an eight story cross-laminated timber building and a nineteen story tower. The project team includes Japanese firms Shigeru Ban Architects and Earthscape, along with Portland’s GBD Architects. At 4th & Burnside Colas Development is proposing a building of between five and seven stories, with a multicultural food venue; office space on the second floor for Colas and the Bing Kong Tong Chinese Benevolent Association; and housing above that.

New apartments are coming to a site formerly occupied by a Firestone auto shop, reports the Portland Business Journal. Amara at 15 NW Park Ave will include 138 residential units.

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Weekly Roundup: Willamette Blocks, Rocket Empire Machine, River District Navigation Center, and more

The Willamette Blocks proposal by developer Alamo Manhattan was presented to the Design Commission last week.

The Willamette Blocks proposal in South Waterfront (previously known as the Landing at Macadam) is facing a blacklash* from nearby residents, writes the Daily Journal of Commerce.

OPB covered the River District Navigation Center (previously known as the Oregon Harbor of Hope) which opened after the largest-ever single contribution to Portland and Multnomah County’s shelter system.

The Portland Tribune wrote about a work session on the Housing Opportunity Initiative—the combined package of the Residential Infill Project, Better Housing By Design and the Anti-Displacement Action Plan. Later in the year City Council will consider a plan to allow up sixplexes on lots currently zoned single family, if half of the units in the structure are affordable.

A new food hall and brewpub will open in Montavilla’s Rocket Empire Machine, writes Eater Portland.

The Land Use Board of Appeals (LUBA) has remanded the Central City 2035 Plan, over the issue of building heights allowed in Chinatown. In 2018 City Council settled on a 200′ height limit for parts of the district, replacing previous zoning that ranged from 100′ to 425′. Critics said that a 200′ height limit is too high. LUBA decided that the City did not adopt adequate findings to explain why 200′ complied with its adopted policies.

The Nature Conservancy showcases its mission with revamped Portland headquarters, writes the Portland Business Journal.

Portland Architecture considered height limits in the Pearl and Old Town, with the Hyatt Place and Allison Residences in mind.

The Oregonian reports that after “a brief reprieve, Portland-area rents are starting to tick up again.”

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Weekly Roundup: Division 28 Homes, Oregon Harbor of Hope and Live Nation South Waterfront

Hacker Architects are designing the Division 28 Homes, which were recently presented to the Design Commission.

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the Division 28 Homes, a 10-unit mixed-use building that “looks to foster a sense of community.”*

The Live Nation South Waterfront venue is raising concerns about noise and traffic, reports the Business Tribune.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope shelter and navigation center has opened in the Pearl, reports the Oregonian.

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