Weekly Roundup: 140 SW Columbia, Heartline, Iron Fireman, and more

140 SW Columbia St

140 SW Columbia will include 349 residential units, directly to the east of the KOIN tower.

Construction on the 20-story tower at 140 SW Columbia will begin by the end of the year, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reported vacation management company Vacasa has moved into a new home, occupying all the office space at HeartlineThe Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the GBD Architects-designed tenant improvement.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the Iron Fireman building, where a second phase of core-and-shell improvements is wrapping up.

Mayor Wheeler has selected Shannon Callahan as the permanent director of the Portland Housing Bureau, according to the Oregonian. Callahan had been serving as the interim director since 2017.

Hey Love, the ’60s- and ’70s-style fern bar-inspired cocktail joint, has opened inside the Jupiter NEXT hotel, reports the Portland Mercury.

Weekly Roundup: 7 Southeast Stark, 1727 NW Hoyt, Press Blocks, and more

7 Southeast Stark

7 Southeast Stark will include four floors of office space above 6 levels of structured parking.

The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at construction progress at 7 Southeast Stark, the 10-story mixed use building being squeezed into a parcel between I5 and the Union Pacific railroad tracks*. Plans for a nearby 9 story office building at 129 SE Alder, also designed by Works Progress Architecture for Harsch Properties, have been put on hold.

Construction on the Press Blocks will start this month, reports the Oregonian. The first phase of development will include the half block office building, now known as Canvas. Construction on the 23-story tower is expected to start in 2019, however financing has yet to be secured.

The Northwest Examiner wrote about the impact of the ethics complaints leveled against Historic Landmarks Commissioner Wendy Chung, over her involvement in the review of the affordable housing development at 1727 NW Hoyt St.

The City of Portland is moving to preserve and create new affordable homes near the proposed SW Corridor MAX line, reports the Oregonian.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress at the TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch.

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Weekly Roundup: Redd on Salmon, Garlington Place, TwentyTwenty, and more

The Redd

The Redd East involves the adaptive reuse of a 1918 ironworks building in the Central Eastside.

Construction is nearing completion on the east building at The Redd on Salmon Street, the two-block food distribution hub by the Ecotrust. The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the progress made to date.

In what is believed to be a first for Portland, a quarter of the units at the TwentyTwenty Condominiums are being marketed exclusively to buyers who live in Asia, reports the Oregonian.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the recently completed Garlington Place Apartments in Northeast Portland. The 52 unit development includes a mix of homes designated as affordable to people earning under 60% of median family income, for veterans, and for clients of the adjacent health clinic in critical need.

The Oregonian reported that the 148-unit affordable housing development at 1727 NW Hoyt St was approved by the Historic Landmarks Commission. Housing activist and attorney Alan Kessler has filed a lawsuit against the City of Portland, over the high cost of extracting public records, according to the Willamette Week. Kessler had requested records related to the involvement of one of the members of the Landmarks Commission during early Design Advice Request meetings.

Weekly Roundup: 9747 NE Glisan, Multnomah County Courthouse, Pepsi Blocks, and more

The Design Commission has approved an affordable housing development at 9747 NE Glisan St, designed by MWA Architects for Northwest Housing Alternatives.

The Oregonian reported on the Design Commission’s approval of a 159-unit affordable housing project at 9747 NE Glisan St.

With woonerfs proposed at the Pepsi Blocks and Block 216, the Daily Journal of Commerce looked at the Dutch inspired urban design trend.*

NBP Capital plans to buy and renovate the historic Multnomah County Central Courthouse, reports the Oregonian. The building is being sold for $28 million plus 2 years of free rent to the County.

Hat Yai 2.0 will have vegetables, table service, and elbow room, reports Eater Portland. The Thai restaurant is set to open in the Modera Belmont by the end of November.

The Portland Business Journal reports that Muji has opened a pop up shop to give Portlanders a sneak peek at what’s to come when it opens in the Meier and Frank Building.

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Weekly Roundup: KEX Portland, Hoxton Hotel, Broadway Tower, and more

The KEX Portland will be located in the historic Vivian Apartments at 110 NE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. A building permit for the addition, seismic upgrade and change of occupancy is currently under review.

Eater Portland reports that the KEX Portland hostel at will include a restaurant, bar, and rooftop patio bar run by Iceland’s Ólafur Ágústsson, the food and beverage director Iceland’s only Michelin-starred restaurant.

Submarine Hospitality, owners of Ava Gene’s and Tusk, will open a new restaurant and two bars in The Hoxton Hotel (formerly known as the Grove Hotel).

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the Portland Housing Bureau latest rules for affordable housing in condominium developments*, which have been revised from an initial draft that received strong criticism from developers.

The Radisson Red hotel in the Broadway Tower will open in November, reports the Oregonian.

Portland Art Museum director Brian Ferriso and Hennebery Eddy co-founder Tim Eddy spoke to Portland Architecture about the latest designs for the Portland Art Museum Rothko Pavilion.

The Portland Housing Bureau will use housing bond funds to buy, tear down and replace the Westwind Apartments at 333 NW 6th Ave, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: OHSU KCRB, the Silica, PSU Karl Miller Center, and more

OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building

Construction has wrapped up on the OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building.

The state of the art OHSU Knight Cancer Research Building opened last Friday, reports the Oregonian. The Daily Journal of Commerce looked at how the project team came together to aid the fight against cancer*, using an integrated project delivery method. The Portland Business Journal took a first look inside the $160 million building.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of The Silica, a heavy timber and glass building at 4073 N Williams Ave.

An article in Architect magazine covered how Carbon12 managed to rise over code and financing hurdles.

Metropolis magazine wrote about how the PSU Karl Miller Center quickly became the center of Portland State University’s campus.

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Weekly Roundup: LISAH, Moxy Hotel, Heartline, and more

LISAH Kenton

LISAH (Low Income Single Adult Housing) intends to provide dignified permanent supportive housing at a lower construction cost, using modular construction and shared common spaces.

Happy Labor Day. Because we didn’t do a weekly roundup last week, here are the news articles that caught our eye over the past fortnight.

The Kenton Women’s Village, a tiny home village for homeless women, will have to move by next year. According to the Oregonian Transition Projects has secured the funding for the first phase of LISAH (Low Income Single Adult Housing) , which will comprise of “36 studio and 36 one-bedroom apartments that would rent from $300 to $700 a month.”

Portland Monthly reported on the closure of Nong’s Khao Man Gai original location, to make way for the Moxy Hotel.

Willamette Week reported on Portland’s hotel-building spree, and asking whether visitors can keep up.

QuickFish poke has opened in the Pearl District building Heartlineaccording to Urban Works Real Estate.

The Portland Mercury asked if Portland Inclusionary Housing rule is really hurting developers.

Curbed reported that Oregon “recently approved an addendum to its building code that allows timber structures to be built over six stories without having to acquire special permission”.

Weekly Roundup: Block 216, The Carson, Rothko Pavilion, and more

Block 216

The GBD Architects designed Block 216 tower would rise to a height of 455′, making it one of the tallest buildings in Portland.

The Oregonian published the latest images of Block 216, the hotel, office and residential tower proposed for the 10th & Alder food cart block. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that the project team faced tough questions from the Design Commission at its second Design Advice Request hearing*.

New construction has sent a flood of new apartments onto the market, leading to a month’s free rent becoming standard, writes the Willamette Week.

The Willamette Week reported that The Carson “appears to be among the first apartment complexes in the U.S. to feature Amazon smart-home technology in every apartment“.

The Portland Art Museum Rothko Pavilion has been redesigned to incorporate an open passage between the Park Blocks and SW 10th Ave, writes the Oregonian.

Portland Monthly wrote about the District Office, the six-story, cross-laminated timber building that “reflects a booming Central Eastside“.

The Overlook Neighborhood opposes new rules for how developers notify neighbors about coming construction projects, reports the Portland Mercury.

The Willamette Week reported that Oregon GOP gubernatorial candidate Knute Buehler opposes the Metro housing bond.

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Weekly Roundup: Lloyd Live Nation, Gladys McCoy Building, WorldMark, and more

Live Nation is planning a new concert venue in the building that was formerly home to the Lloyd Center’s Nordstrom.

Healthy progress” is being made on Multnomah County’s new Gladys McCoy Health Department Headquarters, reports the Daily Journal of Commerce.*

A new music venue by Live Nation is proposed as part of the Lloyd West Anchor Remodel, reports the Oregonian.

The Oregonian reports that despite problems with faulty cross-laminated timber panels at Oregon State University’s Peavy Hall, the product  “remains hot with developers“, including Beam Development, who are using it at their District Office project in the Central Eastside.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the newly completed Asian Health and Service Center in Lents.

Portland Architecture visited the Pearl District’s Canopy Hotel to look at the custom printed aluminum panels on the hotel’s facade.

Wyndham Destinations confirmed that they are building the WorldMark Portland on SW Naito Parkway. According to the Portland Business Journal the property will have “condo-style suites“.

An October opening date has been set for the Powell Blvd Target at 3031 SE Powell, reports the Oregonian.

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Weekly Roundup: Lincoln High School, Oregon Harbor of Hope, Broadway Corridor, and more

Lincoln High School

The new Lincoln High School will be built at the west side of the campus, allowing the existing school to remain open during construction. The new school is being designed by Bora Architects.

The Lincoln High School Rebuild went in front of the Design Commission for the first time. The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about the reception it received.*

Eater Portland reported that Bamboo Sushi offshoot QuickFish will open its third location in Heartline on August 15th.

The Oregon Harbor of Hope homeless shelter and navigation center is half a million dollars over budget, reports the Oregonian.

The Portland Housing Bureau is teaming with three other public agencies to provide more than $12 million for projects that combine housing and mental health services, writes the Portland Business Journal.

A group called the Healthy Communities Coalition is pushing for a massive number of affordable units at the Broadway Corridor, according to the Willamette Week.

Cafe Hey Love Superette has opened in the lobby of Jupiter NEXT Hotelwith coffee, pastries and CBD lattes, writes Eater Portland.

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