Metro Reports: Framework, George Besaw Apartments, Block 45, and more

Block 45

Block 45, as presented to the Design Commission in October of this year

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested by Jones Architecture for a project at 8608 N Lombard St:

New mixed-use building.

Early Assistance has been requested by Portland Parks and Recreation for the Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center at 4315 NW St Helens Rd:

Proposal at Forest Park Entrance and Nature Center. Planned improvements: 1) nature center with restrooms, 2)access drive and parking with ada spaces and bus parking; 3) trailhead and accessible pathways connect to forest park;4) street frontage improvements

Early Assistance has been requested by DECA Architecture for a project at 10414 NE Halsey St:

Proposal is to transform this two level structure (which is currently a hardware store and saddle shop with apartment unit on second level) to an urban winery with production, tasting room, offices and storage areas. Apartment unit with minor upgrades will stay as is.

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled by Abbasi Design Works for a renovation of the Old Fire Station Property at 510 NW 3rd Ave:

Proposal is to renovate the existing historic fire station landmark building to retail and office space and construction of new on-grade parking.

A project at 2014 SE 11th Ave has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

New four story 26,500 gsf building providing 34 apartment units and 1,771 sf of retail space on the ground level.A central apartment entry courtyard is proposed to be shared as a ped/public amenity.

Block 45 has been submitted for Type III Design Review by LRS Architects and Lever Architecture:

Proposal is for a new 12-story building with 7,500 square feet of ground floor retail and approximately 240 residential units. Project is a mix of affordable and market rate housing. No parking is proposed.

A project at 1332 N Skidmore St has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Holst Architecture:

2 new mixed-use buildings, 158 apartment units, 59 parking spaces with underground parking. 2 mods requested: parking area setbacks and landscaping; standards for all bicycle parking.

A project at 525 SE Martin Luther King Jr Blvd has been submitted for Type III Design Review by Hacker Architects:

Proposal is for new construction of a six story building above ground with two levels of underground parking. There will be five levels of office space above one level of retail or restaurant use.

A project at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave has been submitted for building permit review by William Wilson Architects:

New 4-story wood framed mixed use building including 232 unit apartment building with basement garage, and site improvement, interior trash room, shell commercial space(potential future restaurant)

Framework at 430 NW 10th Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 12-story, mixed-use building; five floors of office and five floors of residential over ground floor retail; see comments re: review by State of Oregon Building Codes Division;

An excavation and shoring permit for the Oregon Convention Center Hotel has been submitted for review:

Excavation and shoring, underground utilities, stuctural foundations, vertical structure only, vertical fire protection standpipe at stairs

A building permit was issued to GBD Architects for the George Besaw Apartments at 2323 NW Savier St:

New construction of new mixed use 4 story apartment building containing 51 residential units, with retail and services on the ground floor

A building permit was issued for a project at 9779 SE Market St:

New building with atrium, offices for administration and music department; music area includes auditorium, music and choir classrooms, and restrooms with storage area at mezzanine level; administrative office area includes reception area, offices, conference rooms, restrooms, mezzanine level above includes larger conference room, alumni center and current storage area

 

Convention Center Hotel Approved by Design Commission (images)

The Design Commission has approved the Oregon Convention Center Hotel, which represents one of the final hurdles for the long planned project. The Hyatt Regency branded hotel will include 600 guest rooms and 32,000 sq ft of ballroom and meeting room space. The ground level of the 14 story building will include public facing spaces including the main lobby, a restaurant, bar, the junior ballroom and a 24-hour retail market. The second and third floors will include the main ballroom, meeting rooms, a fitness center, and a Regency Club lounge. Guest rooms will be located in the body of the 180′-6″ tall tower, on levels 3 to 14.

The hotel is being developed by developer Mortenson, with a design team that includes ESG Architects and Mayer Reed Landscape Architecture. The $240 million hotel is being funded from a mix of public and private sources. $165 million will be invested by Hyatt/Mortenson Development, while Oregon Metro will contribute $60 million in bonds backed by lodgings tax revenue expected to be generated by hotel guests. Additional funding sources includes $4 million from Metro’s Convention Center reserves and $10 million from lottery funds.

Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

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Weekly Roundup: Convention Center Hotel, International School, Schools bond, and more

Convention Center Hotel

The proposed Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

The Business Tribune wrote about “Portland’s new international front porch“—the Convention Center Hotel. The Hyatt Regency branded hotel recently went in front of the Design Commission for its first Design Review hearing.

A change in policy at the Bureau of Development Services means that ranked properties on the city’s Historic Resources Inventory will now be subject to a 120 day demolition delay, even if the property owner requests that it be removed from the Inventory.

The Business Tribune wrote about how advocacy organization Restore Oregon wants to ensure that “we don’t want to lose those things that make Portland Portland” as the city grows.

As thousands of units per year get built in Portland, the DJC looked at how much parking developers are choosing to build. While investors once demanded a 1:1 parking to units ratio, 0.6:1—or less—has become common.

The Business Tribune reported that despite ongoing building boom, “Oregon’s construction industry ranked 47th overall in contribution to state GDP.”

Construction has finished on the International School Expansionreports the Portland Business Journal. According to the paper the school “kicked off the school year this week with a ribbon cutting ceremony for its new Learners’ Hall, a 10-classroom building for fourth- and fifth-grade students”.

The Willamette Week reported that parents are warning that delays to Portland Public Schools’ $750 million bond could doom it to failure. If passed, the bond would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School.

Weekly Roundup: Hotels booming, Multifamily cooling, Schools bond and more

129 SE Alder

129 SE Alder is the latest creative office development in the Central Eastside

The Oregonian reported that Portland’s hotel boom—which includes the Cornelius-Woodlark, Canopy Hotel, Porter Hotel, AC Hoteland the Convention Center Hotel—will by 2020 result in 40% more hotel rooms than there are now.

The Willamette Week opined that “Portland City Hall seems to have learned its lesson about parking minimums raising rents” as the City Council struck down a proposal to add parking minimums for new residential development in the Northwest Plan District.

The DJC reported* that the Metro area multifamily market is beginning to cool as “after years of apartment development, supply appears to be starting to make a dent in demand”.

Harsch Investment Properties revealed a new creative office projected planned for 129 SE Alder St (previously 110 SE Washington St) to the Portland Business Journal. The design of the 9 story building is by Works Partnership.

According to The Oregonian, Portland Public Schools will seek voter approval for a $750 million construction bond in November. If passed, the bond would pay for the rebuilds of Lincoln High SchoolMadison High School and Benson High School.

The Portland Business Journal reported that Mill Creek Residential Trust paid Meriwether Partners $13.2 million for the former Premier Press building in the Pearl, a significant increase over the $6.05 million paid for the property in 2014. The transaction will allow the mixed use project at 505 NW 14th Ave to grow larger, at the expense of the now cancelled 1440 Hoyt office development.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Focus: Portland’s Tallest Planned Buildings (2016)

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability).

Image from the Discussion Draft of the Central City 2035 Plan, showing a possible development scenario approximating future growth in the Pearl District over 20 years (Bureau of Planning & Sustainability). At least two of the sites shown as potentially developable have current proposals on them.

It is just over a year since Next Portland last did a roundup of the tallest buildings planned or under construction in Portland. At that time, we counted 25 buildings over 100′ in height planned. Today we count 40. Given the length of time it takes to complete a high rise building, many of the buildings on the 2016 were also on the 2015 list. Four buildings are no longer on the list this year, due to having been completed: Block 17, Pearl West, the Aster Tower and Park Avenue West. Seven buildings that were still in the design phase last year are now under construction. No building on last year’s list is known to have been cancelled.

Read on to see our complete list. Where possible, the heights given are the building height as defined in the Portland Zoning Code and published in the Design Commission’s Final Findings. In some cases the heights have been estimated.

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Weekly Roundup: Framework, Park Avenue West, Block 75 Phase II and more

The 12 story Framework building by Lever Architecture, planned for a site as NW 11th & Glisan in the Pearl

The 12 story Framework building by Lever Architecture, planned for a site at NW 10th & Glisan in the Pearl

In an article titled “Wooden Buildings as Strong as Steel” Newsweek wrote about how Portland is leading the nation in the adoption of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT). The article includes quotes from Ben Kaiser of PATH, architect and developer of Carbon12and Thomas Robinson of Lever who is the architect for Framework in the Pearl and Albina Yard.

An article and photo gallery in the Portland Business Journal showed how CLT is made. Riddle-based D.R. Johnson Lumber Co is currently the only domestic lumber mill certified as capable of producing the wood panels.

The Portland Business Journal covered Block 75 Phase IIthe next high-rise building planned for the Burnside Bridgehead. The Works Partnership designed building is the latest partnership between Beam Development and Urban Development + Partners.

The Oregonian noted that a Travel Portland found that hotel prices have soared since 2010. The rising rates have led to a hotel construction boom, as Next Portland covered last year.

Construction is underway on the expansion of the SERA designed NW Portland International HostelIn a story about the project KGW wrote that the hostel is trying “to keep up with the booming tourism in the Rose City”.

The Portland City Council approved a realignment to the route of the proposed extension of SW Bond between the Tilikum Crossing and SW River Parkway. The extension, which will begin construction this year, allows OHSU projects including the Knight Cancer Research Building to move head.

The first residential tenants are moving into Park Avenue Westreported the Portland Business Journal. The TVA Architects designed building is now the fourth tallest building in Portland.

The Portland Development Commission is increasing its contribution to projects in Lents by $6.3 million, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects include the Asian Health and Services Center by Holst Architecture, Oliver Station by Ankrom Moisan Architects and 9101 SE Foster Rd by Hacker Architects. The developers behind Oliver Station have gained control of the Chevron station at SE 92nd and Foster, enabling the project to occupy the full block.

Commissioner Steve Novick wrote about an idea that is rapidly gaining traction as a way to bring affordability back to Portland’s neighborhoods. “Missing middle housing” is new term for old styles of development, currently prohibited in most of Portland, at a density between that of single family detached houses and large mid-rise apartment buildings. These include housing types such as rowhomes, courtyard apartments, triplexes, built to the same height and scale as single-family homes.

A post at Portland Shoupistas asked if the PDC’s $26 million garage at the Convention Center Hotel  will be a money maker or a money loser. Though planned as  revenue generator, the post points out that “just to break even, this garage will need to generate more than $12 per space every day of every year for 20 years, starting in 2020.”

KOIN reported that “Ivy Island may not be ‘gateway’ to St. Johns for long“. A street vacation in the St Johns neighborhood was approved this week. The vacation will allow the mixed use Union at St Johns building by Jones Architecture to move ahead, while creating a safer road layout.

 

Weekly Roundup: 21 Astor, Convention Center parking garage, Providore Fine Foods and more

The proposed garage at the Convention Center Hotel

The proposed garage at the Convention Center Hotel

The Portland Business Journal reported that the board of the Portland Development Commission approved a resolution to build a $26 million garage adjacent to Convention Center HotelThe 425-stall parking garage will include 375 stalls dedicated to the hotel. The majority of the remaining stalls will be used by Trimet.

The City is looking for feedback on the Central City 2035 plan, according to the Portland Business Journal. The new plan will rewrite the zoning code for Downtown, the Pearl, the Lloyd District and other areas of Portland’s Central Business District, and was released for public comment this week. Public displays will happen at the Development Services Center from February 22nd to 26th and at the Olympic Mills Building from February 29th to March 4th.

An opinion piece by three employees of ECONorthwest, a regional economic consulting firm, asked if Oregonians really want housing that’s affordable. The authors argued that the first order of business should be to bring the supply of housing into line with demand, and that there are three options to achieve this: build out, build up, or do both.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about the pros and cons of the vacation of a piece of right-of-way in St Johns known as “Ivy Island”. The vacation, which went before City Council this week for a first reading, will allow the Union at St Johns development to move ahead.

Developer Bob Ball has set up a new company, Robert Ball Companies, and is moving forward with a new building at 915 NW 21st Ave. The 21 Astor mixed-use building will include 27 apartments and 4,500 sq ft of ground floor retail.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the under construction Albina Yard office building. The four-story, 16,000 sq ft building is using Oregon fabricated Cross-laminated timber for its primary structure.

Portland Architecture wrote about the lecture and interview given by Kengo Kuma at Portland Art Museum. The Japanese architect is the designer of the new buildings currently under construction at the Portland Japanese Garden.

The Oregonian reported that Patrick Quinton, director of the Portland Development Commission, will step down this year after 5 years leading the agency.

Deconstruction has begun on two 1920s houses at NE 45th and Fremont, according to the Hollywood Star News. The project is the first commercial development so far to take advantage of Bureau of Planning & Sustainability offered incentives for deconstruction over demolition. The buildings will be replaced by the Bridgetown mixed-use development, which include 50 units of housing and 6,000 sq ft of retail.

After news broke about the Ankeny Blocks development last weekend, Food Carts Portland noted that the project could threaten the food carts at SW 5th and Stark, SW 3rd and Washington and SW 2nd and Stark. Journalist Michael Anderson replied with an article published on Medium titled “Chill, Portland: The downtown food carts are not about to close“.

The Willamette Week wrote that like the house in ‘Up’, the Dockside Saloon will live forever in a slot in the Field Office by Hacker Architects.

The Portland Business Journal wrote about how the onsite sewer and stormwater treatment system at Hassalo on Eighth saved the developers $1.5 million in City levied development charges. The NORM system treats 100 percent of the grey and black water created by the three residential buildings, along with the Lloyd 700 Office building.

Providore Fine Foods opened this week on NE Sandy, with vendors that include Pastaworks, Flying Fish Company and Oyster Bar, The Meat Monger, Little T Baker, Rubinette Produce Market, Emerald Petals and Arrosto. Eater PDX published photos of the completed interior.

 

Weekly Roundup: Toyoko Inn, Post Office redevelopment, Legacy Central Lab and more

Toyoko Inn

SW 3rd & Oak, the planned location of a Toyoko Inn

The Oregonian reported that the board of the Portland Development Commission approved the terms of a Purchase and Sale Agreement for the United States Post Office site in the Pearl District. The City will pay $88 million to acquire the 13.4 acre site.

At the same meeting, the PDC board also approved the sale of a site at SW 3rd and Oak to Toyoko Inn. The Japanese hotelier plans to build a 300 to 400 room hotel on the site, which would be the company’s first West Coast location.

Demolition crews have begun work at the former home of the Oregon Ballet Theater. The building is demolished to make way for the Modera Belmont apartments.

Places over Time published their analysis of 2015 in Portland architecture and development.

The Portland Business Journal reported that despite an ongoing lawsuit, Metro still expects that the Convention Center Hotel will open in 2018.

Demolition is underway on the former Plaid Pantry and Sammy’s Flowers on NW 23rd and Glisan, according to the Portland Chronicle. The buildings will be replaced by a new Restoration HardwareRevised designs for the project will be presented to the Historic Landmarks Commission on January 25th.

Legacy Health held a grand opening for its new Legacy Central Lab building in the Lloyd District. The 62,000 sq ft building sits on a site previously used as a surface car park.

The Oregonian reported that builders are weighing lifting their opposition to overturning Oregon’s 17 year old ban on inclusionary zoning.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the Ballou & Wright building in the Pearl is set to undergo a $10 million makeover into creative office space. The historic structure was most recently used as Hanna Andersson’ headquarters. The children’s clothing retailer recently moved to a building in Kerns.

The Iron Fireman building at 4784 SE 17th will be converted into creative office space, according to the Portland Journal. The 115,000 sq ft was most recently home to aircraft parts manufacturer PECO Manufacturing, who have moved to a site in Clackamas County.

 

Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of the Year

The Goat Blocks

LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, the subject of our second most viewed post of 2015

2015 is the first full calendar year Next Portland has been in operation, and it’s been a year of huge growth for the site. As the year draws to a close it seemed like a good time to look at what the most popular posts of the year were. If there’s an overall trend evident it’s that posts about tall or large buildings do well. The single most popular post was the round up of the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction. Posts about high rise buildings under construction—including Block 136, The Cosmopolitan, The NV (formerly The Overton), and Yard (formerly Block 67)—feature prominently in the list. The giant development at Oregon Square makes the list three times, and the redevelopment of the USPS site in the Pearl is included three times. The most popular post about a single project covered LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, a superblock development currently under construction in inner Buckman.

Other posts to make the top 25 were more surprising. The list includes the Worldmark by Wyndham and The Society Hotel, both relatively small hotel projects in Old Town. The initial post about 3rd & Taylor likely performed so well not because of the scale of the project, but because Next Portland was the first place to write about the potential demolition of the Hotel Albion. At only 8 stories Carbon12 wouldn’t come close to making the list of the tallest buildings planned for Portland, but is notable for the fact that the high rise structure will be built out of wood.

Were there any posts you particularly enjoyed reading this year? Let us know in the comments. Here is the full list of our most popular posts of 2015:

1 – Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

2 – LOCA @ The Goat Blocks

3 – Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67

4 – Focus: 20 New Hotels Proposed For Portland

5 – Worldmark by Wyndham set to receive Design Advice

6 – Carbon12, an 8 story wood building, proposed for N Williams

7 – Concepts released for redevelopment of USPS site

8 – Pre-Application Conference scheduled for SW 3rd & Taylor

9 – Under Construction in Old Town: The Society Hotel

10 – Cook Street Apartments

11 – Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment returns in front of Design Commission (images)

12 – The Fair Haired Dumbbell

13 – Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75

14 – PDC identifies preferred concept for Post Office site

15 – Block 136 heading to Design Review

16 – Under Construction in South Waterfront: Block 37

17 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton

18 – Design Commission approves Oregon Square

19 –Design Commission reviews Oregon Square

20 – Oregon Square update

21 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park

22 – Design Commission approves The Porter hotel

23 – 4th & Harrison returning for Design Advice

24 – Grand Belmont returns before Historic Landmarks Commission

25 – Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

 

Metro Reports: Convention Center Hotel, 419 E Burnside, Con-Way Leland James Center and more

419 E Burnside

419 E Burnside

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits. We publish the highlights.

Otak Architects have requested Early Assistance for a project at 1500 NE Irving St:

New building – 2 options: either new office building – or new residential building. Hoping to meet community design standards.

Scott Edwards Architecture have requested Early Assistance for a project at 1205 SE Morrison St:

Proposing new 4-story apartment building with ground-floor covered parking and community space

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 6400 SW Canyon Ct:

Proposed project is for 267 apartment units located in four buildings with structured parking under and on-site parking and related site improvements.

Leeb Architects have requested Early Assistance for a project at 5327 N Interstate Ave:

Proposal for new apartment complex with underground parking and ground floor commercial

Polyphon Architecture & Design have scheduled a Pre-Application Conference to discuss a project at 710 E Burnside St:

Pre-application conference to discuss new 11-story mixed use building, which will require Type III DZ.

Works Partnership have submitted the expansion of the Jupiter Hotel for Design Review:

Proposal is for a six story development to expand the Jupiter Hotel.

The Convention Center Hotel has been submitted for Design Review:

Proposal for new hotel and adjacent parking garage, with adjustment for parking and loading entrances

SERA Architects have submitted the Con-way Leland James Center Renovation for building permit review:

Re-skin exterior of building, new metal stud walls tto support brick veneer, and windows. create office core for future TIs, add 4th floor penthouse with decks and green space. add vehicle ramp to basement for new tenant parking. ***NO OCCUPANCY UNDER THIS PERMIT***

Demo interior of unoccupied bldg, includes all MEP and non supoorting walls, and all exterior siding.

The first building permits were issued for 419 E Burnside:

Demolish free standing canopy and 20’x 25′ office for used car sales lot. Demolish stormwater facility located on parking lot. Associated with 14-216353-CO and 14-216353-FND-01-CO.

Excavation, shoring and foundation at basement. Basement slab, basement columns and wall, first floor post tensioned concrete slab, below grade utilities.

A building permit is under review for a project by Carleton Hart Architecture at 110 SW Arthur St:

New, 3-story multi-family project with 39 units of studio and 1 bedroom apartments.

A building permit was issued to Boora Architects for partial demolition of the YMCA building at 2815 SW Barbur Blvd:

partial – a) demolition of exterior east and north facades; b) demolition of interior partitions and casework; and c) demolition of exterior site elements to the east and north of the building. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing contractors to obtain separate demolition permits.) No occupancy during construction.

A building permit was issued to Waterleaf Architecture & Interiors for a portion of the Lloyd Center Remodel:

adding new plaza space and mall entry facing Multnomah Street, including a new curainwall, a new sprial entry stair located inside the Mall, a new pedestrian bridge over the plaza, a new internal traffic ramp, pedestrian stair at the SW parking structure and required bike parking.

A building permit was issued to Colab Architecture for a project at 1510 N Sumner St:

New construction of 25-unit apartment building with partial ground floor retail; interior bike parking; attached trash enclosure with eco roof above, no onsite parking