Weekly Roundup: Lennox Apartments, NE Alberta & MLK, Fair Haired Dumbbell, and more

Lennox Apartments

The Lennox Apartments at SE 52nd and Holgate

The Portland Business Journal wrote about the 64 apartments coming to a “long-dormant corner of Southeast Portland”. The Lennox Apartments at 4455 SE 52nd Ave will also include 3,500 sq ft of ground floor retail space, which will be outfitted for a restaurant.

With the Design Overlay Zone Assessment Project (DOZA) getting underway, the DJC wrote about how “development has overloaded the system“*.

Places Over Time wrote about the dialog between two buildings that are about to go up on the same block in the Pearl: Framework and the Canopy Hotel.

Portland Architecture covered a talk given by Lever Architecture’s Thomas Robinson about Framework. The 12 story will be constructed of Cross Laminated Timber, which it make it the tallest mass timber building in the USA.

Oregon Business reported that winners of a recent Cross Laminated Timber contest included Framework and Carbon12.

According to The Oregonian, Natural Grocers won’t open at NE Alberta & MLK until February 2018—almost a full year later than expected.

The Portland Business Journal had a closer look at the next 689 apartments coming to the Lloyd District. The development at 1400 NE Multnomah recently had its first full Design Review hearing.

The New York Times wrote about the Fair Haired Dumbbella project that “keeps it funky, with design and funding“.

The Boys & Girls Club in Westmoreland has been sold, according to the Portland Business Journal. The building at 7119 SE Milwaukie Ave will be replaced with a new mixed use development.

Plans are moving forward for an office and hotel development in downtown, according to the Portland Business Journal. The projects at 3rd and Taylor and 3rd and Salmon respectively will bring 175,000 sq ft of office space and 20 story hotel to Downtown Portland. Demolition permits have now been filed for the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

Construction was recently completed at the Cosmopolitan on the ParkBisnow reports that the Pearl district high rise was 96% sold prior to completion.

*This article will be unlocked for the rest of this week. After this week it will only be viewable by DJC subscribers.

Metro Reports: 3rd & Taylor, Holiday Inn Express, 1400 NW 22nd and more

3rd and Taylor

The proposed office building at 3rd & Taylor, as presented to the Design Commission in November 2015

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits. We publish the highlights.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 2922 SE 82nd Ave:

Proposal for a 3-story enclosed mini-storage facility with drive-through acess.

Early Assistance has been requested for a project at 304 NE 99th Ave:

The proposal is for a 6-story, 58 residential unit building. Ground floor parking is proposed. A 7.5 foot pedestrian path is proposed along the north property line. A Type III Design Review is required.

Stack Architecture have submitted a project at N Crawford & N Charleston Ave for Design Review:

Design Review for a four-over-one apartment bldg with 1 level of parking on an undeveloped lot. Project includes 101 units with 40 parking spaces. Two modifications requested: one for ground floor window standard, and one to increase height.

Ankrom Moisan Architects have submitted the office portion of 3rd & Taylor for Design Review:

New 10 story creative office building with ground floor retail space, bicycle parking, and rooftop amenities.

A building permit is under review for a project at 233 NW 16th Ave:

New 5 story, 50 unit apartment building with groundfloor commercial, onsite storm water management

A foundation permit was issued for the Grove Hotel renovation and expansion:

partial – EXISTING BUILDING: demolish north theater addition (portion of building within the new tower footprint) and basement level, ground level, second level + third level- existing slab on grade, existing non-structural partitions, ceilings, finishes, etc. New footings for new shear walls. Install new basement level slab (new lower elevation). New shear walls. EXISTING AND NEW ADDITION UNDERGROUND UTILITIES: water, sanitary, storm, electrical piping. NEW ADDITION FOUNDATION (Foundation = below grade plus ground floor slab): New shoring- steel soldier piles + lagging, tiebacks, and shotcrete. Matt slab on rammed aggregate piers foundation (Geopiers). Basement foundation walls- Shoring becomes permanent basement foundation walls. Basement level cast-in-place concrete columns. Ground level PT slab (entry level at grade).

A building permit was issued to Works Partnership for work at 1400 NW 22nd Ave:

Change of occupancy from film production to office – shell only. ASCE 41 seismic upgrade. Second story exterior: new brick cladding, new windows. First story exterior:new storefront and accessible entrances. Alteration of interior space to create open courtyard. New roof with new deck. Interior improvements include: new restroooms and bike storage, all new stairs, new ramps. Enclose trash and utility room. Relocate mezzanine to be used as office. **separate tenant improvement permits required.**

A building permit was issued for the Holiday Inn Express @ Cascade Station:

New 4 story, 104 room holiday inn express to include breakfast area, laundry room, fitness room, check-in/lifestyle lounge, covered patio, pool with patio and bike parking w/associated parking, utilities and landscaping. 189 sq foot detached trash enclosure

Weekly Roundup: Albina Yard, Slate, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and more

4703 N Albina

Construction is underway on the Albina Yard office building, which is using Cross-laminated Timber

Venerable restaurant Besaw’s reopened last week at the LL Hawkins apartment building in Slabtown. Eater PDX published photos of the new interior.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about the demolition of a number of houses in order to make way for a mixed use development at 2301 NW Savier. The new building by GBD Architects will wrap around the building that was formerly home to Besaw’s restaurant.

BikePortland reported that a “gear sphere” sculpture was set to be installed outside the under construction Cook Street Apartments by LRS Architects.

OHSU is in the early stages of planning for a major expansion of the Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal.

The Portland Chronicle wrote about the potential demolition of a building at 3336 SE Belmont St, slated to be replaced by a three-story mixed use building by BKL/A Architecture.

Construction is about to begin on the Works Partnership designed PDX Commons senior co-housing at SE 43rd and Belmont. The site was formerly the location of the Good Food Here food cart pod. As The Oregonian reports more than half of the carts have now relocated across the street to form the Bite on Belmont pod.

As the Pine Street Market gets ready to open The Oregonian published their ultimate guide to the vendors planned for the Old Town food hall.

Portland Architecture published their notes from the Centennial Mills public forum, which explored how the historic building complex might still be saved.

The developers behind 3rd and Taylor have laid out their plans for the block, wrote the Portland Business Journal. The design review package for the hotel portion of the project has been submitted by Ankrom Moisan Architects. The office building is planned to move forward separately in the coming months.

In [mis]representation Places over Time wrote about the tools architects use to visualize their designs, how these can shape the design itself, and how it is easy to present a false sense of reality.

Coworking firm CENTRL Office will expand into the Slate building at the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The 10 story building by Works Partnership is scheduled to open later this year.

Construction is underway at the Lever Architecture designed Albina YardThe 4 story office building is the first commercial building in the United States to make use of domestically fabricated Cross Laminated Timber as a structural element. A video posted last week shows the progress made so far:

Weekly Roundup: Centennial Mills, 3rd & Taylor, Veritable Quandary and more

Centennial Mills

A sculpture park adjacent to the renovated Feed and Flour Mills was one of the options being explored for Centennial Mills by Harsch Investment Properties

With the fate of Centennial Mills uncertain, the Pearl District Neighborhood Association held a meeting to discuss the future of the site. Presenters included Jordan Schnitzer of Harsch Investment Properties, who had previously been selected as the developer for the property. The PDC allowed the memorandum of understanding between them and Harsch to expire in November, leaving open the possibility that all the buildings on site will be demolished. More information about the future of the property can be found at www.millmeeting.org.

Residents have started moving into the Union Apartments by GBD Architects, according to a story in The Oregonian.

Two historic buildings set to be demolished to make way for the 3rd and Taylor development have gained a temporary reprieve, according to the Portland Business Journal. The developers have agreed not to demolish the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple or the Hotel Albion until at least April 30. The developers made the agreement with advocacy group Restore Oregon, who in return withdrew their appeal to the Land Use Board of Appeals. A blog post at the Restore Oregon site states that “while the development team continues to assert that saving the buildings is not financially feasible, they have been engaging with Restore Oregon and others about options that could retain the Workmen Temple.”

A topping out ceremony was held for the 21-story Yard building, with 30 people in attendance including Congressman Earl Blumenauer. The Skylab designed project has been gaining a lot of attention lately due to the changes made between the design review process and the issuance of the project’s building permit. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that the situation could lead to changes to the City’s design review process in response.

The Oregonian reported that the restaurant Veritable Quandary will close this summer in order to make way for the new Multnomah County CourthouseThe County will demolish the restaurant building. The adjacent Jefferson Station building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, will remain.

The Willamette Week noted that Commissioner Steve Novick has called out environmental activists for  failing to make the case that bigger and more dense housing can reduce car use.

The Portland Chronicle wrote that an apartment project proposed at 2915 SE Division St would likely see the demolition of a 106-year-old home.

 

Focus: 25 Office Buildings Planned for Portland

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

Pearl West by Hacker / GBD Architects, the first new office building to break ground in the Central City after the recession

While Portland has long been considered a desirable place to live, it has traditionally lagged its suburbs—Washington County particulary—in income and job growth. Following the recession this appears to have changed. Employers increasingly desire a location in central Portland. As commercial vacancy rates have dropped and rental rates gone up there has been a sudden influx of new office proposals.

The vast majority of these are speculative projects, where the developer starts work on the project without a specific tenant in mind. Only three of the buildings—the Daimler Trucks North America HQ, the Multnomah County Health Department HQ and the Seven Corners Community Collaborative—are planned for a specific end user.

Click through to see our roundup of the major projects going on right now, arranged in no specific order. Where a significant portion of the building will be used for functions other than office, the area of the office floors alone has been given. Note that the area of any building may not be directly comparable to another due to differences in methods for how floor area is calculated.

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Focus: Our 25 Most Popular Posts of the Year

The Goat Blocks

LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, the subject of our second most viewed post of 2015

2015 is the first full calendar year Next Portland has been in operation, and it’s been a year of huge growth for the site. As the year draws to a close it seemed like a good time to look at what the most popular posts of the year were. If there’s an overall trend evident it’s that posts about tall or large buildings do well. The single most popular post was the round up of the 25 tallest buildings planned or under construction. Posts about high rise buildings under construction—including Block 136, The Cosmopolitan, The NV (formerly The Overton), and Yard (formerly Block 67)—feature prominently in the list. The giant development at Oregon Square makes the list three times, and the redevelopment of the USPS site in the Pearl is included three times. The most popular post about a single project covered LOCA @ The Goat Blocks, a superblock development currently under construction in inner Buckman.

Other posts to make the top 25 were more surprising. The list includes the Worldmark by Wyndham and The Society Hotel, both relatively small hotel projects in Old Town. The initial post about 3rd & Taylor likely performed so well not because of the scale of the project, but because Next Portland was the first place to write about the potential demolition of the Hotel Albion. At only 8 stories Carbon12 wouldn’t come close to making the list of the tallest buildings planned for Portland, but is notable for the fact that the high rise structure will be built out of wood.

Were there any posts you particularly enjoyed reading this year? Let us know in the comments. Here is the full list of our most popular posts of 2015:

1 – Focus: 25 Tallest Buildings Planned or Under Construction

2 – LOCA @ The Goat Blocks

3 – Burnside Bridgehead, Pt II: Block 67

4 – Focus: 20 New Hotels Proposed For Portland

5 – Worldmark by Wyndham set to receive Design Advice

6 – Carbon12, an 8 story wood building, proposed for N Williams

7 – Concepts released for redevelopment of USPS site

8 – Pre-Application Conference scheduled for SW 3rd & Taylor

9 – Under Construction in Old Town: The Society Hotel

10 – Cook Street Apartments

11 – Lloyd Cinemas redevelopment returns in front of Design Commission (images)

12 – The Fair Haired Dumbbell

13 – Burnside Bridgehead, pt I: Block 75

14 – PDC identifies preferred concept for Post Office site

15 – Block 136 heading to Design Review

16 – Under Construction in South Waterfront: Block 37

17 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part II: The Overton

18 – Design Commission approves Oregon Square

19 –Design Commission reviews Oregon Square

20 – Oregon Square update

21 – North Pearl High-Rises, Part I: The Cosmopolitan on the Park

22 – Design Commission approves The Porter hotel

23 – 4th & Harrison returning for Design Advice

24 – Grand Belmont returns before Historic Landmarks Commission

25 – Hyatt Regency at the Oregon Convention Center

 

Weekly Roundup: 12th & Morrison office, Grant High Modernization, the Truman Apartments and more

1139 SW Morrison by Design Department and LRS Architects

1139 SW Morrison by Design Department and LRS Architects

The Portland Business Journal took a first look at the 6 story office building planned by Menashie Properties for a site at 1139 SW Morrison. The building is being designed by Design Department and LRS Architects.

Construction is underway on the PSU School of Business Administration.  The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the work underway.

The Oregonian published 5 takeaways from Portland’s plan for next 20 years of growth.

Portland Architecture interviewed the architects and developer behind the development at 3rd and Taylor, which threatens the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple and the Hotel Albion.

The Oregonian reported on the new 20 story condo tower planned for Block 20 of the Hoyt Street Yards in the Pearl. The building would have 150 residential units and 190 parking spaces.

The James Beard Public Market is set to close on the deal to acquire the land at the west end of the Morrison Bridge, according to The Oregonian. The current schedule envisions the market opening to the public in 2020.

Design work has begun on the Grant High School Modernization, one of the projects funded as part of the $482 million bond passed in 2012. Grant Magazine published the first conceptual drawings of what the rebuilt school will look like.

The Portland Chronicle published images of The Truman apartments at SE 44th and Hawthorne. Construction on the 30 unit building is due to begin in early 2016.

Design Commission offers advice for 3rd and Taylor (images)

Ankrom Moisan Architects have gone before the Design Commission with proposals for a nearly full block development at SW 3rd and Taylor. The project for Onder Development would include a 20 story hotel building on the southern half of the block and a 10 story office building on the northern half of the block. The potential loss of two historic buildings on the site has brought significant attention to the project, including a mention by the Historic Landmarks Commission during their State of the City Presevation Report to the City Council last week.

3rd and Taylor

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Weekly Roundup: 3rd and Taylor, Clay Creative, Centennial Mills and more

3rd and Taylor

The proposed developed at SW 3rd and Taylor by Ankrom Moisan Architects

Restore Oregon announced that they filed concurrent appeals to the City and to LUBA, arguing that the City erred in removing the Albion Hotel and Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple from the Historic Resource Inventory. The buildings are threatened by the development at 3rd and Taylor.

Online bank Simple will be the anchor tenant for Clay Creativeaccording to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The new space will be “nearly double the size of Simple’s current home and will be able to accommodate 500 people.”

Writing about Framework, the proposed 12 story building in the Pearl, the Portland Mercury looked at how the use of wood in high rise construction could “help solve the city’s affordability problem, create living-wage jobs in rural communities, and help save the planet”

The Portland Business Journal reported that the concrete slab for the AC Hotel by Marriott was poured last weekend. The pour included 1,100 cubic yards of concrete, enough “to cover a football field with a six-inch slab.”

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75which has now reached its maximum height. The project is scheduled for completion in mid-2016.

The Portland Development Commission has walked away from a deal with Harsch Investment Properties for development on the site of Centennial Mills, determining that it wasn’t financially viable. Partial demolition is currently underway on the long vacant site. The current demolition work will leave the feed and flour mills in place, but with no plan in place for what to do with them a decision will need to be made in the new year whether to also demolish those buildings.

In a piece on Division Street, KGW looked at how it “got so popular and why the growth is causing problems for people who live, work and dine at Portland’s new restaurant row”.

The Portland Chronicle reported that demolition is likely imminent on two single family homes at 1515 SE 44th, which will be replaced by a four-story mixed-use development with 30 residential units facing SE Hawthorne Blvd.

Weekly Roundup: United Workmen Temple Building, Post Office Redevelopment, Porter Hotel and more

930 SW 3rd

The mixed use development at 930 SW 3rd Ave, which originally proposed to incorporate the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple

Restore Oregon noted that two downtown buildings have been removed from the City’s Historic Resources Inventory. The buildings are on the site of a proposed mixed use development at 930 SW 3rd Avewhich will include a 20-story hotel and 10-story office building. As part of the development the Hotel Albion (which includes the Lotus Café and Cardroom) will be demolished. The Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple Building will be incorporated into the development will also be demolished.

In a 5-0 vote, the Portland City Council adopted the Broadway Corridor Framework Plan, which will form the vision for how the 14 acre Post Office site in the Pearl will be developed. The acquisition of the site, worth between $135 and $177 million according to developer Mark Edlen, will cost the City up to $80 million.

Construction will begin by the end of the year on the 299 room Porter Hotel at SW 2nd and Jefferson. The 16 story building will be included in Hilton’s “Curio” collection of hotels.

The Society Hotel opened this week in Old Town / Chinatown. The Portland Mercury published photos of the low cost hotel meets hostel, and described the “gorgeous rooftop deck” as the project’s “crowning jewel”.

Shortly after acquiring trucking company Conway, XPO Logisitics laid off 101 Portland based workers. Though headquartered in Ann Arbor until its acquisition, Conway was a large landowner in Northwest Portland. What effect, if any, the acquisition will have on the redevelopment of the Conway Masterplan area is currently unclear.

Kaiser is planning a 700 space parking garage at 500 NE Multnomah in the Lloyd District. According to BikePortland the structure “aims in part to free up space on Kaiser’s other parking lots, which could then be developed or sold in order to continue the surge of big developments [in] the Lloyd District”.

The Portland Chapter of the AIA held its annual design awards last weekend. Portland Architecture wrote about the winning projects, which included Lever Architecture’s Treehouse and Allied Works’ PNCA 511 Building.

In a post titled ‘The City of Fabric Buildings‘ Places over Time noted how curious it is that “Portland has developed such an international reputation as a city without the assistance of any real place-specific visual aides”.

Design work is about to start on the Multnomah County Health Dept HQwhich will be located on a site near Union Station. The new building will be “nine stories and run between $85 million to $95 million” according to a report in The Oregonian.

Portland Monthly reported that health food “haven” Prasad opened a second location at the Portland Rock Gym, which recently completed a major expansion.

NOTE: This post has been revised to reflect that the Temple building will be demolished, as shown on drawings published on the City Auditor’s website Monday.