Metro Reports: 9747 NE Glisan, Centennial Mills, Riverplace Redevelopment, and more (UPDATED)

9747 NE Glisan

Northwest Housing Alternatives’ project at 9747 NE Glisan, designed by MWA Architects, as presented to the Design Commission in February 2018 at its second design advice hearing.

Every week, the Bureau of Development Services publishes lists of Early Assistance applications, Land Use Reviews and Building Permits processed in the previous week. We publish the highlights. This post covers May 21st to May 27th, 2018. NOTE: This post originally included building permit intakes and issuances from the subsequent week. It has been updated to include the correct projects.

Early Assistance has been requested by GBD Architects for the Riverplace Redevelopment:

Proposal is for a master plan development of approx. 8 acres.

A Pre-Application Conference has been scheduled by SERA Architects to discuss the redevelopment of Centennial Mills:

Master Plan – the developer intends to pursue a voluntary CC Master Plan (33.510.255) to establish the development framework for a mixed-use waterfront redevelopment.

A project at 11858 NE Halsey St has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Northpoint Development:

Demolition of existing commercial structure, site improvements, and construction of a new 4-story, 132,818 SF self-storage building with accessory office space, parking lot, utilities and landscaping.

A project at 5145 SE Mcloughlin Blvd has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Fosler Portland Architect:

Construct a new 19-unit, 3-story apartment building (approximately 9,000 sq ft on the southern 1/3 property (in RH zone).

A project at 5316 SE 18th Ave has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Design Department Architecture:

2-story, 8 unit, apartment building.

A project at 5308 SE 18th Ave has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Fosler Portland Architect:

Construct a new 17-unit, 3-story apartment building (approximately 7,800 sq ft).

A project at 4212 N Interstate Ave has been submitted for Type II Design Review by Design Department Architecture:

Proposal is for a 4-story wood frame building. 3 retail spaces on the ground floor. 15 residential units above, 5 units per floor

A project at 1715 SW Salmon St has been submitted for Type III Design Review by SERA Architects:

Construction of a new 170,000 sq ft, 8-story mixed use building with 178 market rate apartments, ground floor retail, and a 4-stacker mechanical parking system
(80 parking spaces). Two loading spaces are proposed in the structured parking area. The units are a mix of 2 bed, 1 bed, 1 bed loft, and studio units and meet the inclusionary zoning requirements.

A project at 9747 NE Glisan St has been submitted for Type III Design Review:

Proposal is for 159 unit affordable housing. One modification for the transit street setback.

A project at 3075 NE Sandy Blvd has been submitted for for Type III Design Review by Mackenzie:

New Lexus dealership to include vehicle showroom, service area, parking, and commercial space.

An addition to the Yale Union building at 800 SE 10th Ave has been submitted for for Type III Design Review by Dowl:

Renovation of the Yale Union property that involves assemby occupancy, seismic and systems upgrades and building addition to east side of property

A Type Ix land division has been submitted to facilitate a project at 7428 N St Louis Ave:

Proposal for a two-parcel partition to be developed with a 12-unit apartment building on each parcel.

A project at 4229 SE Woodstock Blvd has been submitted for building permit review:

Addition of 3 story mixed use building to existing 1 story building; shell only; demo portion of existing 1 story building; new addition to include 1 apartment unit and commercial space; 2 floor to include commercial office space; and 1st fl to include retail and office areas;

A project at 431 NE Church St has been submitted for building permit review by Wright Architecture:

New 3 story apartment building with 19 units and associated site work. No off street parking.

A project at 1511 SE Holgate Blvd has been submitted for building permit review by Base Design & Architecture:

Construct new 4 story (28) unit apartment building with associated site work;

A project with two buildings at 7106 and 7126 N Greenwich Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 3 story, 12 unit apartment building with attached 138 S.F. Trash enclosure, includes associated sitework *** mechanical permit to be separate ***

New 3 story, 12 unit apartment building with attached 138 S.F. Trash enclosure, includes associated sitework *** mechanical permit to be separate ***

A project with two buildings at 1662 and 1654 SE Spokane St has been submitted for building permit review by Builders Design Inc:

Construct new 4 story (27) unit apartment building; with associated site work

Construct new 4 story (27) unit apartment building; with associated site work

A project at 14639 SE Rhine St has been submitted for building permit review:

New 3-story modular triplex and associated site work for 7 total triplexes on lot to include parking, landscaping, covered trash enclosure (under 120sq ft), walkways & utilities.

New 3-story modular triplex – building B

New 3-story modular triplex – building C

New 3-story modular triplex – building D

New 3-story modular triplex – building E

New 3-story modular triplex – building F

New 3-story modular triplex – building G

A project at 6556 N Greenwich Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 3 story, 12 unit apartment building with attached 138 S.F. Trash enclosure, includes associated sitework *** mechanical permit to be separate ***

A project at 5004 SE Woodward St has been submitted for building permit review:

New 4 story, 30 unit apartment building with one tenant space on first floor and attached 48 S.F. trash enclosure, includes associated sitework *** mechanical permit to be separate *** roof trusses to be a DFS ***

A project with two buildings at 4549 SE 122nd Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 4 story apartment building with 17 units, parking lot, utilities, landscaping, and site improvements. Building A.

New 4 story apartment building with 19 units. Building B.

A project at 1223 SE Lambert St has been submitted for building permit review:

Construct new three story 15 unit apartment building and associated site work

A project South of 4236 N Mississippi Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Waechter Architecture:

New 3 story mixed use building, (2) tenant spaces each on 1st and 2nd floors (occupied by architectural firm) and (1) apartment on 3rd floor, includes associated sitework *** mechanical permit separate ***

A project at 5080 NE 33rd Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New 3 story 12 plex apartment bldg w/18-174200-MT

A project at 8308 SE 13th Ave has been submitted for building permit review by MFA Architecture & Planning:

Construct new 4 story mixed use building with basement storage, ground fl retail and office, and 19 units on top 3 levels; associated site work

A project at 5236 SE 18th Ave has been submitted for building permit review by Ankrom Moisan Architects:

New 3 story apartment building with 19 units

A project at SW 36th & Troy has been submitted for building permit review:

New 4 level commercial building with (1) subgrade apartment unit; first level (M); ground, second and third levels (B). Includes associated site work w/trash area in subgrade level

A project at 2410 SE 82nd Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

Shell only; construct new 1 story building with associated site work

A Motel 6 at 11144 NE Sandy Blvd has been submitted for building permit review:

Construct new 4 story 69 room motel, includes associated sitework *** w/ 18-175712-co & 18-168941-mt ******

A project at 8123 SE 17th Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

New single story retail building, parking lot, detached trash enclosure less than 120 sq ft floor area, stormwater facility, site improvements and utilities.

A project at 3256 NE Columbia Blvd has been submitted for building permit review:

New construction of self storage facility and associated site work; detached trash enclosure (18 175515 CO)

A project at 2100 N Albina Ave has been submitted for building permit review:

Construction of a new 4-story self-storage building, parking lot, surface improvements, stormwater treatment facilities & landscaping. See 18-175420-CO for trash enclosure. Demo permit to be obtained separately

A project with multiple buildings at 5413 NE Columbia Blvd has been submitted for building permit review:

New 3 story with basement storage facility with office space and all associated site work

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

New single story storage building

 

Weekly Roundup: TwentyTwenty, Oregon Harbor of Hope, PSU Viking Pavilion, and more

The TwentyTwenty Condominiums in Sullivan’s Gulch will include 162 units

The Daily Journal of Commerce wrote about Hacker, the architecture firm taking “wood to the next level“*. Next year firm will move into a new office framed with cross-laminated timber that they designed at 525 SE MLK.

A sponsored post at the Oregonian covered the TwentyTwenty Condominiums, currently under construction at 1177 NE 21st Ave. The building is one of only two large condominium developments currently under construction in Portland.

The Oregonian reported that Prosper Portland chose Denver based Continuum as the master developer for the Broadway Corridor. The project will include the redevelop of the main post office site in the Pearl.

Prosper Portland is in negotiations to sell the Centennial Mills site to Texas based developer Lynd Corporate, reports the Oregonian.

KOIN reported on a zoning proposal that would enable a developer to build affordable housing on the parking lot at 126 NE Alberta St, which has neighbors concerned.

After three decades at the city and nine years leading the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, Susan Anderson will be stepping down from her role at the City of Portland, reports the Willamette Week.

Columbia Sportswear CEO Tim Boyle plans to contribute $1.5 million to help build the Oregon Harbor of Hope at a site at the Broadway Bridge, reports the Oregonian. The Willamette Week wrote about five key facts about the press conference that brings developer Homer Williams to closer to building a homeless shelter.

The Daily Journal of Commerce published photos of the finished PSU Viking Pavilion.

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Weekly Roundup: Grove Hotel, Meier & Frank, Heartline, and more

Grove Hotel

The renovated and expanded Grove Hotel will open this summer as The Hoxton, Portland.

The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that a proposal at 2275 NW Glisan St, which would replace the building destroyed by the December 2016 gas explosion, was lauded by the Historic Landmarks Commission*.

The Portland Business Journal reported ($) that Japanese retailer Muji will move into a 15,000 sq ft space in the renovated Meier & Frank Building.

Vacation rental management company Vacasa has signed a lease to take all four floors of office space at Heartlinereports the Oregonian. The additional space, across the street from their existing office, will provide space for 300 employees or more.

When it opens this summer the Grove Hotel will be operated by “posh UK hotel brand” Hoxton, reports Portland Monthly.

In rejecting the Fremont Place apartments the Willamette Week argued that the city council is sending dangerous signals, leaving developers “uncertain about the rules for winning approval of projects“. After the decision the paper reported that Pearl District residents are “divided and fractious”, with one neighborhood association member concerned about the impact the decision will have on the redevelopment of Centennial Mills and the Broadway Corridor.

The Oregonian reported on City Council deliberations over whether to revive a property tax break for developers who include affordable housing in their projects. During the hearing City Commissioner Nick Fish doubled down on his argument that “more high-end housing supply doesn’t ease demand”, according to the Willamette Week.

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Weekly Roundup: Beatrice Morrow, Ankeny Apartments, Grove Hotel, and more

The Beatrice Morrow Apartments will include 80 affordable housing units, offered under the city’s preference policy to those displaced from N/NE Portland.

The Oregonian wrote about the affordable housing planned for the former Grant Warehouse site on NE MLK. The building will be named the Beatrice Morrow, after the African American attorney who ran for state office in 1932.

The Willamette Week wrote about Home First Development’s plans to build 300 apartments and sell them to the city for $100,000 apiece.

The DJC wrote about how the Portland Development Commission is “driving ahead to expand parking stock“*, with investments totaling tens of millions of dollars planned at Old Town Chinatown Block 33, the Convention Center Hotel and at the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park.

The Portland Business Journal reported that the City Council and PDC have chosen to move forward with a full redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site. As a consequence, the Mounted Patrol Unit will not return to the site.

Portland Architecture spoke to Allied Works associate principal Dan Koch to about plans to rebuild the destroyed Robert and Ann Sacks House at 2281 NW Glisan and create a new building at 510 NW 23rd Ave.

The Grove Hotel has topped out, writes the Portland Business Journal. When it opens later this year it will include a new restaurant by Kurt Huffman’s ChefStable group.

In a two part series, the Business Tribune wrote about the Design Commission’s denial of the Ankeny Apartmentsand the upcoming appeal to City Council.

An article in Portland Monthly argued that the future of Portland’s skyline Is made of wood. Recent and planned wood buildings include The RadiatorFramework (CEID), 38 Davis, Albina Yard, Framework (Pearl) and Carbon12.

The Portland Business Journal broke the news that the AMF Bowling Alley at 3031 SE Powell Blvd is set to be redeveloped for a ‘national retailer’. The Portland Mercury republished a statement from AMF expressing their plan to continue operating “for its remaining lease term and perhaps longer“.

The Hollywood Star News wrote about plans by Koz Development for a new six-story, 114-unit studio apartment building at 4708 NE Sandy Blvd—a site currently occupied by Umpqua Bank.

The Business Tribune reported that the remodeled Macy’s building downtown will officially be known as the Meier & Frank Building.

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Weekly Roundup: Grant High School, Centennial Mills, 1205 SE Morrison, and more

Conceptual diagram showing how much development would be allowed under a full site redevelopment of the Centennial Mills site (image: GBD Architects). The flour mill would remain and be converted to creative office space, while the rest of the site would likely be used for residential and retail uses, plus an expansion of the Willamette Greenway.

The Willamette Week reported that Portland could be getting a major new music venue at 2034 NW 27th Ave. With a capacity for 3,000 concert goers it would be of a similar size to the Schnitzer Concert Hall or the Keller Auditorium.

According to the Portland Mercury nearly 6,000 residential units were submitted for city review in the past two months—ensuring that they wont be subject to the newly enacted inclusionary zoning rules.

The Oregonian wrote about how affordable housing developers are taking a hit from Trump tax cut speculation.

KOIN reported that the bathrooms at the rebuilt Grant High School will all be gender neutral.

The DJC reported that the Portland Development Commission is moving towards a full-site redevelopment of the Centennial Mills*, which would not include the return of the Mounted Patrol unit to the site.

The Morrison Street Bar & Grill at 1205 SE Morrison St will be demolished to make way for four-story, 39-unit apartment complex, reported the Portland Chronicle.

The developers behind 1320 Broadway, formerly home to the Oregonian, are set to make a substantial return on their investment, according to the Portland Business Journal.

The developers behind the renovation and expansion of the Grove Hotel have sued to evict Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp across the street, reports the Oregonian.

Portland Shoupistas argued that parking is often over supplied at Transit Oriented Developments.

The Willamette Week posted that with the Fair-Haired Dumbbell under construction Portland finally has architecture worth arguing about.

The DJC published photos of the new spaces now open at Roosevelt High School.

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Weekly Roundup: The Woodlark, 1127 SW Morrison, 5 MLK, and more

Cornelius-Woodlark

Image of The Woodlark hotel, after renovation

Architect magazine released its top 50 firms of the year, with Portland-based ZGF Architects in the #1 place. Also on the list from Portland was Hacker, at #13. In the design rankings of nationwide firms Works Partnership came in at #5, ZGF at #7 and Hacker at #17.

A single story commercial building at SW 12th & Morrison is about to be demolished, reports the Portland Business Journal. The building will make way for the 1127 SW Morrison office building.

The DJC reported on how “Sellwood growth stirs residents“*. Projects planned or under construction in the neighborhood include Spokane.137119 SE Milwaukie, Galaxie Lofts and Sellwood Bridgehead.

Knot Springs Spa & Fitness has opened in the Burnside Bridgehead tower Yardaccording to the Portland Business Journal. The 11,500 sq ft facility “offers monthly memberships as well as services by appointment”.

The Oregonian reported that ‘Top Chef’ finalist Doug Adams will be opening a restaurant named Bullard in The Woodlarkthe Downtown hotel that be created in the Hotel Cornelius and Woodlark building. Existing business Johnny Sole, currently located at the site, will close according to the Portland Business Journal.

City Observatory asked if inclusionary zoning in Portland is “a good way to provide more affordable housing, or will it actually worsen the constrained housing supply that’s a big cause of higher rents?”

The Portland Business Journal wrote that the Portland Development Commission has agreed to spend a further $1 million to demolish the feed mill building at Centennial Mills. Current plans still envision the retention of the iconic flour mill.

An investigation by The Oregonian covered how Commissioner Saltzman withdrew the award of city owned land and funding for Meta Housing’s Creators Collective project, and instead gave it to Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives Inc, for their King Parks project.

The Abigail, the latest affordable housing development in the Pearl, had a grand opening on Friday. The 155-unit apartment building includes 128 units for families making between 30 and 60 % of area median family income.

Places over Time wrote about the latest iteration of 5 MLK in “How I Learned to Stop Being and Architect and Design by Committee.”

The Foster Powell blog wrote about the 131 Units of Housing Coming to Foster at 5811 SE Boise, with more on the way at other sites.

The Portland Business Alliance endorsed the city’s affordable housing bond as an “important part of the equation to address housing affordability in Portland,” reports the Portland Business Journal.

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Weekly Roundup: Overlook Pointe fire, 10th & Yamhill Smart Park, Field Office, and more

10th & Yamhill Smart Park

Conceptual image of a renovated 10th & Yamhill Smart Park garage (image by FFA Architecture & Interiors)

The Portland Development Commission received three offers for Centennial Mills, according to The Oregonian. All three offers, valued at $1,000, $100,000 and $3.45 million, were rejected. The redevelopment agency will now consider “how/whether to reengage the market”.

The DJC reported that the under construction Overlook Pointe condominium development at 5425 N Minnesota Ave was burned down in a fire* early Wednesday morning.

The PDC voted to sell property at 1053–1201 NW Naito Parkway to The Wolff Company for $9 million. The Oregonian reported that the developer plans to build 340 apartments on the site, 68 of which would be affordable for at least 10 years.

KGW covered the 1,200 apartments coming to the area in and around the Con-way Masterplan area in NW Portland. Construction is underway on Blocks 294E and 295E and the Leland James Buildingwhich are following on from the LL Hawkins and Slabtown MarketplaceImmediately outside of the masterplan area is Q21, which is nearing completion.

The Portland Tribune wrote about the “new mood in Chinatown“, which after decades of divestment might be seeing a change in its fortunes. The Society Hotel opened last year, and will soon be joined by the newly renovated Mason Erhman Building Annex, Overland Warehouse Company Building and Grove Hotel.

The Portland Mercury profiled Swift Real Estate Partners, the San Francisco Investment Firm that is “Snatching Up Old Town Real Estate“. The company’s acquisitions include the New Market Theatera historic building adjacent to the Skidmore Fountain that could receive a significant addition.

Project^’s Field Office will create a “300,000-square-foot urban campus“, according to the Portland Business Journal. Construction recently started on the Hacker-designed buildings at NW Front and 17th.

More than 1,000 people applied for the 65 housing units available to people displaced from North and Northeast Portland, according to The Oregonian.

The City is planning a $25 million renovation of the 10th & Yamhill Smart Park, according to the Portland Business Journal. The scope of the project will include addressing seismic and ADA deficiencies in the existing structure.

Three new surf shops are set to open in the next year, reports The Oregonian. These include Cosube, which will open in Slate at the Burnside Bridgehead, and Leeward Northwest Surf & Sea, which will open in New New Crusher Court at 2450 NE Sandy Blvd.

According to the Portland Business Journal, furniture retailer Room & Board will open next year in the Pearl District’s newly renovated Fisk Tire Company Building.

The Business Tribune wrote about a day in the life of the team at OHSU working on the Knight Cancer Research Building.

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Weekly Roundup: Albina Yard, Slate, Doernbecher Children’s Hospital and more

4703 N Albina

Construction is underway on the Albina Yard office building, which is using Cross-laminated Timber

Venerable restaurant Besaw’s reopened last week at the LL Hawkins apartment building in Slabtown. Eater PDX published photos of the new interior.

History Treasured & Sometimes Endangered wrote about the demolition of a number of houses in order to make way for a mixed use development at 2301 NW Savier. The new building by GBD Architects will wrap around the building that was formerly home to Besaw’s restaurant.

BikePortland reported that a “gear sphere” sculpture was set to be installed outside the under construction Cook Street Apartments by LRS Architects.

OHSU is in the early stages of planning for a major expansion of the Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal.

The Portland Chronicle wrote about the potential demolition of a building at 3336 SE Belmont St, slated to be replaced by a three-story mixed use building by BKL/A Architecture.

Construction is about to begin on the Works Partnership designed PDX Commons senior co-housing at SE 43rd and Belmont. The site was formerly the location of the Good Food Here food cart pod. As The Oregonian reports more than half of the carts have now relocated across the street to form the Bite on Belmont pod.

As the Pine Street Market gets ready to open The Oregonian published their ultimate guide to the vendors planned for the Old Town food hall.

Portland Architecture published their notes from the Centennial Mills public forum, which explored how the historic building complex might still be saved.

The developers behind 3rd and Taylor have laid out their plans for the block, wrote the Portland Business Journal. The design review package for the hotel portion of the project has been submitted by Ankrom Moisan Architects. The office building is planned to move forward separately in the coming months.

In [mis]representation Places over Time wrote about the tools architects use to visualize their designs, how these can shape the design itself, and how it is easy to present a false sense of reality.

Coworking firm CENTRL Office will expand into the Slate building at the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75, according to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The 10 story building by Works Partnership is scheduled to open later this year.

Construction is underway at the Lever Architecture designed Albina YardThe 4 story office building is the first commercial building in the United States to make use of domestically fabricated Cross Laminated Timber as a structural element. A video posted last week shows the progress made so far:

Weekly Roundup: Centennial Mills, 3rd & Taylor, Veritable Quandary and more

Centennial Mills

A sculpture park adjacent to the renovated Feed and Flour Mills was one of the options being explored for Centennial Mills by Harsch Investment Properties

With the fate of Centennial Mills uncertain, the Pearl District Neighborhood Association held a meeting to discuss the future of the site. Presenters included Jordan Schnitzer of Harsch Investment Properties, who had previously been selected as the developer for the property. The PDC allowed the memorandum of understanding between them and Harsch to expire in November, leaving open the possibility that all the buildings on site will be demolished. More information about the future of the property can be found at www.millmeeting.org.

Residents have started moving into the Union Apartments by GBD Architects, according to a story in The Oregonian.

Two historic buildings set to be demolished to make way for the 3rd and Taylor development have gained a temporary reprieve, according to the Portland Business Journal. The developers have agreed not to demolish the Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple or the Hotel Albion until at least April 30. The developers made the agreement with advocacy group Restore Oregon, who in return withdrew their appeal to the Land Use Board of Appeals. A blog post at the Restore Oregon site states that “while the development team continues to assert that saving the buildings is not financially feasible, they have been engaging with Restore Oregon and others about options that could retain the Workmen Temple.”

A topping out ceremony was held for the 21-story Yard building, with 30 people in attendance including Congressman Earl Blumenauer. The Skylab designed project has been gaining a lot of attention lately due to the changes made between the design review process and the issuance of the project’s building permit. The Daily Journal of Commerce reported that the situation could lead to changes to the City’s design review process in response.

The Oregonian reported that the restaurant Veritable Quandary will close this summer in order to make way for the new Multnomah County CourthouseThe County will demolish the restaurant building. The adjacent Jefferson Station building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, will remain.

The Willamette Week noted that Commissioner Steve Novick has called out environmental activists for  failing to make the case that bigger and more dense housing can reduce car use.

The Portland Chronicle wrote that an apartment project proposed at 2915 SE Division St would likely see the demolition of a 106-year-old home.

 

Weekly Roundup: 3rd and Taylor, Clay Creative, Centennial Mills and more

3rd and Taylor

The proposed developed at SW 3rd and Taylor by Ankrom Moisan Architects

Restore Oregon announced that they filed concurrent appeals to the City and to LUBA, arguing that the City erred in removing the Albion Hotel and Ancient Order of United Workmen Temple from the Historic Resource Inventory. The buildings are threatened by the development at 3rd and Taylor.

Online bank Simple will be the anchor tenant for Clay Creativeaccording to a story in the Portland Business Journal. The new space will be “nearly double the size of Simple’s current home and will be able to accommodate 500 people.”

Writing about Framework, the proposed 12 story building in the Pearl, the Portland Mercury looked at how the use of wood in high rise construction could “help solve the city’s affordability problem, create living-wage jobs in rural communities, and help save the planet”

The Portland Business Journal reported that the concrete slab for the AC Hotel by Marriott was poured last weekend. The pour included 1,100 cubic yards of concrete, enough “to cover a football field with a six-inch slab.”

The Daily Journal of Commerce published construction photos of the Burnside Bridgehead Block 75which has now reached its maximum height. The project is scheduled for completion in mid-2016.

The Portland Development Commission has walked away from a deal with Harsch Investment Properties for development on the site of Centennial Mills, determining that it wasn’t financially viable. Partial demolition is currently underway on the long vacant site. The current demolition work will leave the feed and flour mills in place, but with no plan in place for what to do with them a decision will need to be made in the new year whether to also demolish those buildings.

In a piece on Division Street, KGW looked at how it “got so popular and why the growth is causing problems for people who live, work and dine at Portland’s new restaurant row”.

The Portland Chronicle reported that demolition is likely imminent on two single family homes at 1515 SE 44th, which will be replaced by a four-story mixed-use development with 30 residential units facing SE Hawthorne Blvd.